site title

Topic: stackoverflow

Hey there, stranger!

12-14-12 by Aarthi Devanathan. 16 comments

It’s that most wonderful time of the year again — time for the Stack Overflow Annual Survey! So, put down that third glass of eggnog and fire up a new tab. It only takes a few minutes – and there are stickers!

As the name suggests, we’ve been doing this for a few years now (here are the 2010 results and the 2011 results for your perusal) and we always learn a lot from them. This data is used to support the advertising we sell on Stack Overflow and Server Fault. Advertising helps keep the lights on (and servers humming) around here, so if you use either (or both!) sites, we urge you to participate.

For those of you who’ve been around this block with us before, the survey should look fairly familiar. There’s no longer two jQuery options, though you can still jQuery while you jQuery if you need to. There are some questions that are a bit different, so please read each item carefully before you respond.

Just like previous years, we’re putting ads like the one above around the site to solicit particpation, and this blog post will help us reach our goal of roughly 3,500 responses. We’ll share the results of the survey with you all in a blog post early next year, and you’ll have the option of signing up to receive a copy of the results emailed to you directly at the end of the survey. So, please take a few moments to fill out the survey and then you can get right back to your holiday festivities.

Announcing the Apptivate.MS competition semi-finals

12-10-12 by Abby T. Miller. 5 comments

When we announced the Apptivate.MS competition two months ago, we were hoping that a few members of this community would create and submit a few solid Windows 8 apps – forty or fifty, maybe. A hundred if it really went well.

So when we saw all of the high-quality and innovative app submissions that poured in, we were quite frankly blown away. The Stack Overflow community submitted almost 400 appsSee for yourself!

Yet again, the Stack Overflow community has crushed it.

The quality and size of the submission pool made our next job really, really difficult: narrowing them down to just 50 apps for the semi-finals, ten for each of the following category groups: Knowledge, Games, Interest, Work, and Social. A panel of Stack Exchange judges (appointed by Microsoft) ranked all the submissions based on the following rubric:

  • Innovativeness/Creativity (30%)
  • Quality of Submission (30%)
  • Use of Windows 8 features, such as the live tile display (30%)
  • Public Appeal (voting) (10%)

With these criteria in mind, we put together a killer semi-finalist slate. You can vote for your three favorite apps in each category group between now and December 16th (23:59 UTC).

The three highest-voted apps in each category group will win prizes no matter what. They’ll also be eligible for a $5000 cash grand prize, so cast your votes to ensure that the best app wins the day. Not an altruist? Voting in the semi-finals also makes you eligible for the reviewer contest.

The three top-voted semi-finalists in each category group will win great prizes!

You can also continue to leave comments on any app, which also gets you entry into the reviewer contest – as well as providing valuable feedback to Windows 8 developers.

The semi-finals voting phase ends December 16th, 2012, so get your votes in now!

Stack Overflow Data Visualization Contest

10-09-12 by Kevin Montrose. 15 comments

We all know everyone loves pretty pictures, chock full of graph-y goodness.

You probably also know that about two months ago we started the Stack Overflow Machine Learning Contest, and that it’s now winding down.  All models have been (or will shortly be) committed, and we’re starting to gather data for the final judgement.

What you may not have known about was the subsidiary Visualization Contest, which is looking to find an interesting and informative way of making sense of the mountains of interesting data in our data sets.  You’re free to pull in any additional publicly available information from sources like the Data Explorer or API, but the data set put together for the machine learning contest is a good place to start.

Entries will be accepted through October 26th with voting ending November 1st.  We’ll choose the most awesome of the top-voted entries based on how interesting and informative the visualization is, with bonus points for focusing on the subject of the machine learning contest.

So go out there, find a set of interesting statistics, gin up a cool picture and submit it to the…

Stack Overflow Visualization Contest

Stack Exchange Machine Learning Contest

08-21-12 by Kevin Montrose. 38 comments

Over the last 4 years we’ve built up quite a bevy of moderation tools here at Stack Exchange.  We’ve got closing, editing, deleting, flags of all sorts, voting, commenting, review queues, and more.

Plus our super secret mod tools.

These all work great, but they all require action after a post is made. This is a lot of work for the community, and not particularly friendly toward those posting, particularly new users. In a perfect world, we’d be able to offer specific, targetted guidance for authors whose posts were likely to be shot down, before they ever showed up on the site, and without requiring as much up-front effort from our community.

We’ve already expended some effort on this front with some basic tests that reject obviously problematic questions, and automatically flag borderline ones for review, but we feel this can be done much better.

This is where you come in

We’re running a machine learning contest on Kaggle to find an algorithm that predicts whether (and for what reason) a question will be closed.

 

The idea is simple: we’ve prepared a dataset with all the questions on Stack Overflow, including everything we knew about them right before they were posted, and whether they finally ended up closed or not.  You grab the data, build your brilliant classifier, run it against some leaderboard data and submit your results.  Rinse and repeat until the contest ends, when we’ll grab the most promising classifiers and run them against fresh data to choose winners.

The winners will get our respect, the knowledge they’ve helped make the Internet a better place – oh, and some cold hard cash.

  • 1st prize – $11,000
  • 2nd prize – $6,000
  • 3rd prize – $2,000
There’s also a $1,000 prize for the best visualization of our data.

We’re also hiring a full-time data scientist, and we’re going to be very interested in talking to the authors of the best classifiers.

So head on over now and…

Check out the contest

Some explanation of how we’ll use the classifiers that come out of the contest, as there seems to be some confusion on that point.

First and foremost, there’s no plan to “auto close” questions. Human oversight will always be needed, there are always edge cases, evolving standards, and what-have-yous that won’t be captured in any algorithm.

What we’d be really excited to try out is giving users who are composing questions advice on how to improve them while they’re composing them. This would save a lot of time, reduce the overall close rate, and make new users’ first asking experience more likely to be a pleasant one.

A secondary goal is to improve our auto-flagging of questions, as our current system is very simple and has some known issues.

Week 2 of the Summer of Love: Researching Comments

07-23-12 by Seth Rogers. 50 comments

The quality of the Q&A on Stack Overflow continues to outshine any other on the Internet – thanks to the awesome community. Like any community, unspoken rules eventually become expectations. In the previous post in this series, Joel talks about how the community developed its own set of rules and norms that new recruits simply don’t know about. When a new comer walks into the group and puts her hand up for a high-five and gets chastised by the group because they don’t give high-fives, she walks away embarrassed with head hanging low. That’s unfortunate.

This isn’t a new concern of course – almost four years ago, one day after Stack Overflow left private beta, Chris Upchurch wrote one of the most famous pleas for kindness in response to attacks he observed on new users in Could we please be a bit nicer to the noobs?

A year and a half later, we saw the opposite opportunity for self-reflection when Satoru.Logic, then a member for just over 4 months, asked Why are Stack Overflow people nice? – which was followed up a year later by veteran member dmckee with Are Stack Overflow people still nice?

There’ve been dozens of discussions along these lines over the years, reflecting an increasing perception of our Jekyll & Hyde nature. But always lacking was anything more than anecdotal evidence. And as Stack Overflow grew, it became easier and easier to cherry-pick examples that showed the community as either friendly or fierce. So we decided to gather some objective data:

Comment Friendliness: The Science Hammer

trend graph of comment friendliness over timeTo investigate, we sampled 7,000 comments written on questions on SO and collected 20 independent ratings of attitude for each and every sampled comment (ratings obtained via experienced raters on Mechanical Turk). Comments were randomly selected over the past 3 years. Then we calculated “friendliness scores” for comments based on all 20 ratings.

The first thing we found is that comments on Stack Overflow are, in fact, getting friendlier. As we see in the chart, friendliness ratings are generally positive and continue to trend that way. Since May 2011 at least 75% of all comments sampled are rated positively. Statistical modeling of the data supports these observations: comments now are significantly friendlier than they were three years ago. What about the unfriendly portion? We’ll get to that later.

The next thing we looked into is friendliness differences between tags. According to our sample, comments tagged in ‘C’ tend to be rated as less friendly compared to others. And subtly, ‘Android’ is friendliest. However, the data only reflects minor differences so we should interpret this trend with a grain of Kosher salt…nevertheless, this does address another long-standing question: are programmers using certain languages or technologies more welcoming of newbie questions?

We found that comments on first posts are significantly less friendly compared to the rest, regardless of time period. Though the total percentage of nice comments is increasing (awesome!), the few unfriendly cases can unfortunately drag down a new member’s experience. Experience has taught us that newcomers tend to *really* remember their first interactions within a community; in this case the small percentage of rude comments carry disproportionately more weight in the memory of the newcomer and affect their impressions of the community.

Conclusions

So now that we have some hard data, the question arises: is this a problem, and is it worth addressing? If the majority of comments are friendly and getting friendlier, why risk rocking the boat? The short answer is simply that 3/4 “nice” is still a long way from “Total civility [...] one hundred percent of the time.” It doesn’t take an overwhelming amount of rudeness to create that impression in casual readers, and becoming complacent about our “niceness” is the quickest way to become blind to its absence. We’ll delve into this further in our next installment, but for now I’ll leave you with a question from dmckee:

Is there something else we can do to encourage our big city to keep the small-town feel we grew up with?


If you’re curious on how exactly we collected and analyzed this data, feel free to download the full summary. Look forward to the next post in the series discussing mechanisms and community solutions! And don’t forget; at Stack HQ, we love you all.


Update: Comment examples on MSO