site title

Topic: stackoverflow

Company pages on Careers 2.0

05-20-13 by Shog9. 8 comments

Stack Overflow has always had a strong focus on individual merit. Although collaboration is encouraged to some extent by the editing features, attribution on posts and the design of user profiles all tend to emphasize rugged individuality, that lone wolf toiling away at a keyboard.

But most of us don’t actually work that way. We’re social creatures by nature, and the most challenging part of finding a good job can be finding the pack you want to run with. In spite of the dearth of features aimed at networking, folks have been using Stack Overflow to find and research potential colleagues almost since the day it launched – so a couple years ago, we started looking for ways to make this a bit easier. Well, now it’s done:

With Company Pages, we’ve focused on the best ways to tell an interesting company story. And what better way to tell your story than with massive photos of workstations, team outings, hackathons, local attractions, and the people who make the companies who they are? There are tightly designed sections to list your company tech stack and benefits, along with plenty of room to be creative and communicate what makes your company special, what awesome products you’re working on, and the philosophy that drives your team forward.
Introducing Careers 2.0 Company Pages

Go check out the other wolf-packs… or show off your own on Careers 2.0.

VOTE NOW in the 2013 Stack Overflow Moderator Election

03-08-13 by Shog9. 9 comments

It’s time once again to cast your vote for the next Stack Overflow moderators. The primaries have just ended, and the top ten candidates can be found here: http://stackoverflow.com/election.

Why more moderators?

We’re running the election now (rather than a year from the last election in June) because veteran moderator Tim Post is stepping down in order to work with us as a Community Manager! While we’re extremely lucky to have his hard-working brilliance brought to bear on the problems we face managing all these sites, his transition does create an immediate need for a replacement on the SO mod team.

But of course, we’d be running an election soon anyway; as amazing as the current Stack Overflow moderators are, the workload continues to grow:

What moderators do

Jeff laid out the basic philosophy in A Theory of Moderation:

Moderators are human exception handlers, there to deal with those (hopefully rare) exceptional conditions that should not normally happen, but when they do, they can bring your entire community to a screaming halt — if you don’t have human exception handling in place.

As the previous graph indicates, flags – the primary embodiment of those exceptions – are a fairly frequent occurrence on Stack Overflow, purely because of its size. That said, a lot of flags aren’t identifying things that are particularly exceptional: in particular, posts that need to be closed (duplicates, off-topic questions, etc) or are of extremely poor quality aren’t all that uncommon on a site that gets over 7000 new questions and 11K answers each day. While moderators are well-equipped to handle these quickly, they don’t actually require moderators when a sufficient number of experienced users are willing and able to help.

The effects of improved community moderation tools

I mentioned last year that we were working on tools that would help to distribute the load more evenly between the elected moderators and the community as a whole. Well, eight months after their introduction, I’m happy to report that the revamped Review system is doing exactly that:

As Jeff wrote:

We designed the Stack Exchange network engine to be mostly self-regulating, in that we amortize the overall moderation cost of the system across thousands of teeny-tiny slices of effort contributed by regular, everyday users.

That’s not empty rhetoric – on a site the size of Stack Overflow, it’s absolutely essential. Geoff Dalgas came up with the design for the new review system based on his observations of wikiHow’s Community Dashboard: individual tasks, each focused on a specific need with specific actions to be taken and specific guidance provided for new users. The philosophy: don’t just give people stuff to do – help them learn how to do it.

Geoff, Emmett and Kevin have done some amazing work in making these new tools as fast and effective as possible; while there have been some growing pains and a few unexpected challenges, it’s great to see folks jumping in to help so enthusiastically. In the past 30 days, we’ve seen:

(a detailed breakdown of actions to first posts and late answers can be found here.)

That’s a lot of work being done by a lot of people… Heady stuff. To be sure, that still leaves a huge amount of work for elected moderators, but I think it demonstrates the ability of the whole community to step up and assist when the opportunity is provided, that thousands of you are still willing and able to work together to created and maintain the site that you want to be a part of.

So as you go to cast your votes today, looking over each candidate’s stats and reflecting on what they’d do as a moderator… Remember that moderation doesn’t start with winning an election.

2012 Stack Overflow User Survey Results

01-25-13 by Bethany Marzewski. 42 comments

In December, we launched our 3rd annual Stack Overflow Annual User Survey to learn more about our site demographics and user trends throughout 2012. Compared to last year, we received an even larger sample size this year with almost 10,000 respondents!

Here are a few larger trends we’ve observed over the past three years:

You like us…you really like us!

Since 2009, site traffic to Stack Overflow has grown by a whopping 261.7%! As if this weren’t enough, we’re also now the 86th largest global site, according to Alexa. Our crazy goal of breaking into the top 50 is looking less crazy!

Mobile is on the move.

No real surprise here, but of the mobile family, the number of users who own Android devices increased 29.2% from 2010 to 2012—a bigger increase than owners of iPhones and iPads combined. Despite the rising mobile trend, we were surprised to learn that only 7.7% of you are employed as mobile apps developers and 51.8% of companies still don’t have a mobile app.

You’re getting happier at work.

Since 2010, we’ve seen a 2.2% uptick in workplace satisfaction, so 70% of you are happy in your current jobs. We’re not going to point fingers or anything, but we hope there may be some causation for those of you who found your current job from among the 10,000+ roles that were posted on Careers 2.0 last year.

Since we now have three years’ worth of data, we wanted to put together something a little special for this year’s overview, so check out the infographic below that our designer created to highlight some of our key findings.

In our effort to make all information publicly available, here is a basic report of the results or if you’d prefer to play around with the data yourself, just email alison@stackoverflow.com for the dataset.

 

UPDATED: Check out our European version of the infographic here.

Apptivate.MS: the results are in!

12-20-12 by Abby T. Miller. 16 comments

After almost three months, Apptivate – the application development contest collaboration between Stack Overflow and Microsoft – has come to an end.

Let’s get to the big news right off the bat. Congratulations to our two Apptivate.MS Grand Prize Winners: Piano Time and Layout!

Congratulations to Piano Time and Layout!

Layout is a powerful tool for interaction design that makes prototyping in the early stages of development and design a breeze. Piano Time is a multitouch piano keyboard for your Surface or other Windows 8 tablet device. (It also supports using your keyboard as, well, a keyboard.) It includes recording and playback, a metronome, a learning mode, and more.

As grand prize winners, these two apps win a $5,000 cash prize! They will also be featured in MSDN Flash and on the DevRadio show, and they will be promoted by Microsoft throughout the developer community.

The grand prize winners came from a pool of 15 finalists and were chosen by a panel made up of Stack Overflow’s own Joel Spolsky and David Fullerton, as well as Microsoft developer evangelists Doris Chen and Jeff Brand. There was some stiff competition for the judges to choose from, and we congratulate all of our finalists. They won’t be going home empty-handed, either – along with the winners of the Reviewer Sweepstakes, they’ll go home with some great prizes, too. The first place winners from each category group win a Surface plus a $500 cash prize. The second and third place winners go home with good stuff, too. Johnny, tell ‘em what they’ve won!

And you get a Surface! And you get a Surface! EVERYONE gets a Surface!

The 15 finalists came from a pool of 50 semi-finalists, which in turn came from the list of over 300 fully eligible submissions to Apptivate. Some more stats about the event:

  • There were 456 apps submitted overall, including deleted and ineligible apps
  • The third week of November was the best week for app submission, with 49 apps coming in that week
  • Apptivate users posted 2646 questions and answers in the [windows-8] and [microsoft-metro] Stack Overflow tags
  • Over the course of the event, 3163 users voted (on apps or on comment threads) 7454 times

That’s all for Apptivate… in 2012! The response to this was so positive, we’re already on the lookout for similar collaborations in the new year… So stay tuned!

Hey there, stranger!

12-14-12 by Aarthi Devanathan. 16 comments

It’s that most wonderful time of the year again — time for the Stack Overflow Annual Survey! So, put down that third glass of eggnog and fire up a new tab. It only takes a few minutes – and there are stickers!

As the name suggests, we’ve been doing this for a few years now (here are the 2010 results and the 2011 results for your perusal) and we always learn a lot from them. This data is used to support the advertising we sell on Stack Overflow and Server Fault. Advertising helps keep the lights on (and servers humming) around here, so if you use either (or both!) sites, we urge you to participate.

For those of you who’ve been around this block with us before, the survey should look fairly familiar. There’s no longer two jQuery options, though you can still jQuery while you jQuery if you need to. There are some questions that are a bit different, so please read each item carefully before you respond.

Just like previous years, we’re putting ads like the one above around the site to solicit particpation, and this blog post will help us reach our goal of roughly 3,500 responses. We’ll share the results of the survey with you all in a blog post early next year, and you’ll have the option of signing up to receive a copy of the results emailed to you directly at the end of the survey. So, please take a few moments to fill out the survey and then you can get right back to your holiday festivities.