site title

Topic: stackexchange

Encyclopedia Stack Exchange

05-21-12 by Joel Spolsky. 38 comments

Remember this old picture?

Wiki Blog Digg Reddit Forum Venn Diagram

What’s that “Blog” circle supposed to be about, you ask? WHERE’S THE BLOGGING?

Since Stack Overflow launched, we’ve been trying to explain that it’s not just a Q&A platform: it’s also a place where you can publish things that you’ve learned: recipes, FAQs, HOWTOs, walkthroughs, and even bits of product documentation, as long you format it as a question and answer.

As Jeff wrote:

  • if you have a question that you already know the answer to
  • if you’d like to document it in public so others (including yourself) can find it later
  • it is OK to ask, and answer, your own question on a relevant Stack Exchange site.

For a long time we’ve been pleading for people to write more canonical answers so the same questions don’t keep coming up again and again, and we even have the Self-Learner badge which you can only earn by answering your own question. Still, I’m not sure if the message is getting through to everyone, as evidenced by the misguided comments that sprout up whenever someone answers their own question.

How can we make this any clearer? Maybe a big bold checkbox will help.Answer Your Own Question Checkbox

Now when you ask a question, you’ll see that checkbox right there, reminding you of the option to answer your question on the spot. Furthermore, the answer will be published at the same time as the question, avoiding that awkward moment where well-meaning people rush in to answer something you’ve already got an answer for.

It’s just a tiny checkbox that doesn’t change the mechanics of Stack Exchange in any way, but we have a bold goal for this new feature: we’re trying to move even more of the world’s long-tail, detailed knowledge into Stack Exchange. It works for all 83 sites (and their metas), you get to keep the reputation you earn, and you’ll get a lot more eyeballs than you can get on your blog (no offense… even my blog doesn’t get 24,300,000 monthly uniques).

Revamped Notifications

05-21-12 by Kevin Montrose. 16 comments

About a year and half ago we introduced the Global Inbox, that lovely little red number our analytics tell us everybody loves.

 

 

We’re fiercely protective of the inbox, making sure only actionable things directed at you go into it.  Comments, answers, a handful of post notices, Stack Overflow Careers messages, and the like.  That’s why that little red number is so loved, clicking it shows you awesome, interesting things as a rule.

However, since day one we’ve had a another class of general information notifications, badge awards, revisions, election announcements, and so on.  Stuff that’s good to know, but not always stuff you can respond to.

And here’s how we’ve always displayed those notifications:

 

 

 

If that’s not bad enough, notifications make you dismiss every, single, one - while the Global Inbox is a one-click, friction-less dismiss.  This means that it’s more work to go through your less interesting messages.

This is obviously all out of whack, so we’ve completely reworked the notification system, cribbing liberally from the well received Global Inbox:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Notifications are now…

  • …a tab in the Stack Exchange Genuine dropdown
  • …global: get a badge on Stack Overflow and you’ll see the notice on Gaming
  • …dismissed with one click, just like the inbox
  • …available historically: the last 45 are available, rather than disappearing forever once read

Since notifications aren’t as important as inbox notices, whenever you have unread inbox messages we’ll display the red inbox indicator rather than the gray notification indicator.  Of course, once you open the drop down you’ll see that you also have new notifications.

Hopefully this notification change removes just a bit of friction from using your favorite Stack Exchange sites. I know I for one won’t miss Big Slidy Orange one bit.

Be aware that we’ve also culled and collapsed some notifications types in recent months, aiming to keep our sites annoyance free.

When a Site Grows Quiet

04-25-12 by Shog9. 42 comments

In the lifecycle of a Stack Exchange site, we’ve long held the philosophy that “it takes as long as it takes” to build a sustainable community:

How long can a site stay in beta?

The simple answer is, it takes as long as it takes. We’ll wait. If a site needs more activity, go out and evangelize it. As long as your site shows steady progress and continues to make the Internet a better place to get expert answers to your questions, it will march on.

But when a site struggles to maintain any semblance of steady progress — when it’s struggling to garner an audience, a healthy core of experts, and a steady stream of questions — it becomes increasingly unlikely that the site will find a core audience to sustain it.

Next week, we’re shutting down six sites that fall into this category:

  • Astronomy
  • Economics
  • Literature
  • Firearms
  • Healthcare IT
  • Theoretical Physics

There’s nothing inherently wrong with these topics, or with the good folk who put time and effort into trying to make them work. They will likely make great Stack Exchange sites… someday. But so far, the network just hasn’t been able to provide these sites with the audience they need to make them work. Maybe they’ll find a niche on a different site, or be reborn at some later date as the Stack Exchange audience continues to grow. But for now, we’re shuttering the windows before they’re broken.

The knowledge that went into these sites is not lost. In keeping with our promise not to hoard what was given freely, all content on closed sites will be available for download from the Area 51 page corresponding to each site, in the same format and with the same open license as the data dumps for graduated sites.

We’ve always been reluctant to close a site once it entered public beta. These were difficult choices, as many people are fond of these subjects. Still, we’ve been somewhat remiss in not taking action sooner.

If it’s of any consolation, we have learned a lot from watching these sites grow and evolve. We are hard at work on a next-generation Area 51, with the goal of making site creation easier, faster and more educational: one of the most frequent stumbling blocks for new sites has been the learning curve for folks unfamiliar with Stack Exchange – providing them with help and guidance is key to creating a vibrant, healthy site.

Thank you all for the the knowledge and hard work you’ve poured into these sites. Because of it, someday there will be a site on astronomy… and economics… and literature… and the rest. Stronger and better than ever.

More Notes on Contest Format

04-20-12 by Lauren Gundrum. 2 comments

A few months ago, I outlined a contest formula called “Hot Topics,” which has become a staple in CHAOS’s site-promotion efforts. For those who missed that post, Hot Topics initially worked like this:

Pick a topic of the week, and enter everyone who asks a question related to that topic into a random drawing to win a prize. The number of entries a person gets is equal to the number of questions they ask about the topic of the week.

We now have a few variations on this contest format.

Variations on the Hot Topic Format

  • Highest-scored post – Like the name suggests, instead of raffling off prizes, we reward the question or answer that has the highest score.
  • Most-viewed post – Similar to the “Highest-scored post”, in this variation we reward the post that gets the most views during the contest.
  • Showdown – Showdown contests are slightly different than Hot Topic contests because they involve two topics, pitted against each other. Our first showdown contest was Skyrim versus Modern Warfare 3 – a battle to see which game got the most views and which users asked the top-voted question and answer in each category.

Skyrim vs. MW3 successfully engaged the Gaming community, but it hinged on a manufactured rivalry that didn’t make much sense. Because of that, we’re now using this form of contest when there is a pre-existing event hinged on a showdown scenario. For example, Marvel Comics’ blockbuster event for 2012 is the mini-series Avengers vs. X-Men. Just as the series pits two premier super teams in battle, the current Avengers vs. X-Men contest running on SciFi goes right along with that by pitting our Avengers questions against our X-Men questions in a battle for views.

Drawbacks of the Hot Topic Format

The Hot Topics contest and variations thereof are generally successful in engaging the community and celebrating important events, but there are some drawbacks:

  • They primarily incentivize posting. While posting questions and answers is arguably the most important component of the Stack Exchange model, there are several other actions that keep our sites running too – voting and sharing to name a couple.
  • Only a few people can win, and whether you win is largely left to chance. That is, while you can promote your post by sharing it with your social networks, it’s mostly out of your control how many votes or views it gets.
  • Because there are only a few winners, the competition tends to be very selfish: you can’t vote for or share other people’s posts without hurting your own chances of winning.

Our Newest Contest Format: The Mission

Mass Effect 3 Mission 6

To rectify the shortcomings of Hot Topics, we’ve come up with a new kind of promotion: the Mission. Here’s how it works:

The Mission promotion is pretty simple: design a series of levels, each one more difficult than the last, and give prizes to everyone who completes them.

We first tried this style of promotion to celebrate the release of Mass Effect 3 on Gaming, and it was wildly successful. We ran the contest for 3 weeks, and ended with over 900 questions tagged Mass Effect 3! Nine people completed the entire series of Missions (6 total), and over 50 completed Mission 1.

Our second contest with this format was held on Ask Different to celebrate the release of the new iPad. Instead of 6 Missions there were 3 Levels, and numbers were adjusted accordingly. Additionally, there was a voting requirement.

Benefits and Drawbacks of Missions

There are several benefits to this type of contest in comparison to Hot Topic or Showdown contests.

  • You can incentivize activities besides just asking and answering questions. You can also change the numbers and actions according to what is most appropriate for the site.
  • The first Level/Mission is relatively easy to complete, and they get gradually more difficult. Therefore, users can choose the extent to which they want to be involved.
  • Instead of giving prizes to a set number of people, everyone who completes a certain set of tasks wins. We do put a limit on the number of prizes we can give out per level just so we don’t go bankrupt, but we try to set the limit to be higher than the number of people predicted to complete the Mission based on average site statistics. (As those of you who completed Level 3 in the iPad contest know, we vastly underestimated you! For this we apologize and will try to do better in the future.)
  • Because multiple people can win each Mission/Level, the contest tends to be less competitive. You can vote for and share other people’s posts without hurting your own chances of winning, which better preserves the way the site works naturally.
  • Winning is more controllable. That is, each Mission or Level lays out a few actionable tasks, such as “ask or answer 35 posts and share 15 posts.” We do impose a minimum score requirement on some of them, but the minimum score is always achievable without having to game the system.

These benefits don’t mean that the Mission-style contest is perfect; here are some drawbacks:

  • Sub-par posts are a concern in Mission-contests for a few reasons. First of all, later Missions require users to post a large number of questions and answers, and the focus on quantity may reduce the quality of the posts. Additionally, the extrinsic motivation that large prizes introduce can cause a flood of new questions, which can overburden the moderators and the community in general (see meta threads here and here for more detail).
  • Asking people to share a set number of posts may cause them to exhaust their social networks, making sharing less effective in the future.
  • Mission-style contests require a large time commitment to complete, and we give out a significant number of prizes. Therefore, they are only appropriate when coupled with a very important event in the community, such as the release of a highly anticipated game or product.

Clearly, choosing a contest format depends heavily on the site and the event. Any site that is receiving CHAOS attention is eligible for a contest. However, as stated above, Mission contests will probably only be run on sites that already have  big events happening in their community. I’m optimistic that with these few basic contest models and the suggestions provided in meta, we can continue to improve and come up with something that fits our sites even better.

Let’s Play The Guessing Game

02-29-12 by Jeff Atwood. 61 comments

We’ve observed a particular pattern of questions emerging on several Stack Exchange sites.

All these questions are effectively guessing games.

I remember myself playing this a bit childish, but in some ways awesome game, where you control a tank, and can pick up and stack turrets (and maybe something else) from enemy tanks you kill. Maybe they also had different platforms (and if it’s one with wheels then technically it’s not a tank, but hey). It was around 2000 (or maybe even earlier) and the game had 3D graphics.

Trying to remember a book I read in the 80s, reptiles are dominant, have language, have human slaves. Northern human tribes attack the reptile settlements. The reptiles have gourds of partially digested food…they use some type of slug creature to clean hair and fur off mammals.

Please help me finding the single word for representing a person who guides at right time (at the time of need).

I am looking for a children’s book that features a mouse. He lives in a red ticket booth and sleeps in a drawer and rides a motorcycle. It is either a chapter book or a collection of short stories about this mouse.

The question owner tries to describe something they can’t quite remember, in hopes that the greater community will “buzz in” to hazard an answer based on the limited information provided, like on a game show. The best guess gets upvotes, and potentially an accepted answer checkmark. It’s fun, right?

Our engine is great at these kinds of questions, and they tend to do well:

Of course, guessing game questions aren’t a new phenomenon; I alluded to them in the Pee-Wee Herman Rule. But after a year of observing these guessing game questions grow and spread to multiple sites with similar effects, I no longer believe that the slight benefit of these questions outweighs the many negatives.

1. Guessing game questions aren’t practical

Consider Stack Exchange’s first rule of questions not to ask:

You should only ask practical, answerable questions based on actual problems that you face. Chatty, open-ended questions diminish the usefulness of our site and push other questions off the front page.

A half-remembered description of something you vaguely recall is not what I’d call a practical, answerable question.

Unless the asker has demonstrated a practical reason they need to find this, documented that they’ve invested substantial effort in finding it, and given us something concrete that provides us with a reasonable chance of actually guessing the answer — it’s simply Not a Real Question. At best it is a game show trivia contest.

2. Guessing game questions don’t help others

Because these questions are based on vague, broad, half-remembered descriptions, it is unlikely anyone else will be able to find them through a web search. I have a difficult time imagining how you’d construct a web search, either on Google or via Stack Exchange’s built-in search, to find something that you can’t fully articulate. What’s even worse is that these questions, by their very nature, will contain a bunch of broad, speculative “maybe it’s like…” catch-all terms that are likely to trip up future visitors who end up there by accident.

Consider the example of Netstorm: Islands at War, a game so apparently difficult to remember that our gaming site contains no less than three exact duplicate identify-this-game questions about it:

The goal of Stack Exchange is not to construct un-findable single-serving questions that only help one person, but that’s exactly what guessing game questions tend to do.

3. Guessing game questions are unfair

If we allow vague and insubstantial questions, we are explicitly opening the door to “do my work for me” questions (or worst case, Yahoo Answers) — no need to expend effort, do research, provide examples … just explain in vague, broad terms what it is you partially remember and we’ll do the rest of the hard work necessary to figure it out for you? That’s a dangerous precedent to set. It is disproportionate and unfair to the experts on the site.

Also, an expert in the topic should be able to have at least some confidence that the answer he’s writing answers the question. Take that away, and you’re left with questions that don’t know what they want, and answerers throwing guesses at it hoping one will stick. “Is it mentor?” Nope, try again! “Is it Star Fighter XXIV: The Star Fightening!” Sorry, go fish!

4. Guessing game questions aren’t educational

I understand that it’s sometimes fun to guess what someone is thinking of. I also appreciate that it takes a lot of expertise and deep domain knowledge to take a vague, half-remembered description and nail the exact thing. But I would also argue that these questions aren’t educational in any way, because there’s no way to learn about the process of discovery. A particular community member, by virtue of their experience in the field, just happens to be able to take the limited information you remembered and fill in enough of the blanks to guess the correct answer.

I urge you to click on the guessing game tags yourself and take a long, hard look at the artifacts these guessing game questions are producing. After a year I am convinced that guessing game questions do not meet our goal of making the Internet better.

Quite the opposite, in fact.

* and when your site’s most popular tag is “book-recommendation”, there are perhaps deeper problems to contend with.