site title

Topic: stackexchange

More Notes on Contest Format

04-20-12 by Lauren Gundrum. 2 comments

A few months ago, I outlined a contest formula called “Hot Topics,” which has become a staple in CHAOS’s site-promotion efforts. For those who missed that post, Hot Topics initially worked like this:

Pick a topic of the week, and enter everyone who asks a question related to that topic into a random drawing to win a prize. The number of entries a person gets is equal to the number of questions they ask about the topic of the week.

We now have a few variations on this contest format.

Variations on the Hot Topic Format

  • Highest-scored post – Like the name suggests, instead of raffling off prizes, we reward the question or answer that has the highest score.
  • Most-viewed post – Similar to the “Highest-scored post”, in this variation we reward the post that gets the most views during the contest.
  • Showdown – Showdown contests are slightly different than Hot Topic contests because they involve two topics, pitted against each other. Our first showdown contest was Skyrim versus Modern Warfare 3 – a battle to see which game got the most views and which users asked the top-voted question and answer in each category.

Skyrim vs. MW3 successfully engaged the Gaming community, but it hinged on a manufactured rivalry that didn’t make much sense. Because of that, we’re now using this form of contest when there is a pre-existing event hinged on a showdown scenario. For example, Marvel Comics’ blockbuster event for 2012 is the mini-series Avengers vs. X-Men. Just as the series pits two premier super teams in battle, the current Avengers vs. X-Men contest running on SciFi goes right along with that by pitting our Avengers questions against our X-Men questions in a battle for views.

Drawbacks of the Hot Topic Format

The Hot Topics contest and variations thereof are generally successful in engaging the community and celebrating important events, but there are some drawbacks:

  • They primarily incentivize posting. While posting questions and answers is arguably the most important component of the Stack Exchange model, there are several other actions that keep our sites running too – voting and sharing to name a couple.
  • Only a few people can win, and whether you win is largely left to chance. That is, while you can promote your post by sharing it with your social networks, it’s mostly out of your control how many votes or views it gets.
  • Because there are only a few winners, the competition tends to be very selfish: you can’t vote for or share other people’s posts without hurting your own chances of winning.

Our Newest Contest Format: The Mission

Mass Effect 3 Mission 6

To rectify the shortcomings of Hot Topics, we’ve come up with a new kind of promotion: the Mission. Here’s how it works:

The Mission promotion is pretty simple: design a series of levels, each one more difficult than the last, and give prizes to everyone who completes them.

We first tried this style of promotion to celebrate the release of Mass Effect 3 on Gaming, and it was wildly successful. We ran the contest for 3 weeks, and ended with over 900 questions tagged Mass Effect 3! Nine people completed the entire series of Missions (6 total), and over 50 completed Mission 1.

Our second contest with this format was held on Ask Different to celebrate the release of the new iPad. Instead of 6 Missions there were 3 Levels, and numbers were adjusted accordingly. Additionally, there was a voting requirement.

Benefits and Drawbacks of Missions

There are several benefits to this type of contest in comparison to Hot Topic or Showdown contests.

  • You can incentivize activities besides just asking and answering questions. You can also change the numbers and actions according to what is most appropriate for the site.
  • The first Level/Mission is relatively easy to complete, and they get gradually more difficult. Therefore, users can choose the extent to which they want to be involved.
  • Instead of giving prizes to a set number of people, everyone who completes a certain set of tasks wins. We do put a limit on the number of prizes we can give out per level just so we don’t go bankrupt, but we try to set the limit to be higher than the number of people predicted to complete the Mission based on average site statistics. (As those of you who completed Level 3 in the iPad contest know, we vastly underestimated you! For this we apologize and will try to do better in the future.)
  • Because multiple people can win each Mission/Level, the contest tends to be less competitive. You can vote for and share other people’s posts without hurting your own chances of winning, which better preserves the way the site works naturally.
  • Winning is more controllable. That is, each Mission or Level lays out a few actionable tasks, such as “ask or answer 35 posts and share 15 posts.” We do impose a minimum score requirement on some of them, but the minimum score is always achievable without having to game the system.

These benefits don’t mean that the Mission-style contest is perfect; here are some drawbacks:

  • Sub-par posts are a concern in Mission-contests for a few reasons. First of all, later Missions require users to post a large number of questions and answers, and the focus on quantity may reduce the quality of the posts. Additionally, the extrinsic motivation that large prizes introduce can cause a flood of new questions, which can overburden the moderators and the community in general (see meta threads here and here for more detail).
  • Asking people to share a set number of posts may cause them to exhaust their social networks, making sharing less effective in the future.
  • Mission-style contests require a large time commitment to complete, and we give out a significant number of prizes. Therefore, they are only appropriate when coupled with a very important event in the community, such as the release of a highly anticipated game or product.

Clearly, choosing a contest format depends heavily on the site and the event. Any site that is receiving CHAOS attention is eligible for a contest. However, as stated above, Mission contests will probably only be run on sites that already have  big events happening in their community. I’m optimistic that with these few basic contest models and the suggestions provided in meta, we can continue to improve and come up with something that fits our sites even better.

Let’s Play The Guessing Game

02-29-12 by Jeff Atwood. 61 comments

We’ve observed a particular pattern of questions emerging on several Stack Exchange sites.

All these questions are effectively guessing games.

I remember myself playing this a bit childish, but in some ways awesome game, where you control a tank, and can pick up and stack turrets (and maybe something else) from enemy tanks you kill. Maybe they also had different platforms (and if it’s one with wheels then technically it’s not a tank, but hey). It was around 2000 (or maybe even earlier) and the game had 3D graphics.

Trying to remember a book I read in the 80s, reptiles are dominant, have language, have human slaves. Northern human tribes attack the reptile settlements. The reptiles have gourds of partially digested food…they use some type of slug creature to clean hair and fur off mammals.

Please help me finding the single word for representing a person who guides at right time (at the time of need).

I am looking for a children’s book that features a mouse. He lives in a red ticket booth and sleeps in a drawer and rides a motorcycle. It is either a chapter book or a collection of short stories about this mouse.

The question owner tries to describe something they can’t quite remember, in hopes that the greater community will “buzz in” to hazard an answer based on the limited information provided, like on a game show. The best guess gets upvotes, and potentially an accepted answer checkmark. It’s fun, right?

Our engine is great at these kinds of questions, and they tend to do well:

Of course, guessing game questions aren’t a new phenomenon; I alluded to them in the Pee-Wee Herman Rule. But after a year of observing these guessing game questions grow and spread to multiple sites with similar effects, I no longer believe that the slight benefit of these questions outweighs the many negatives.

1. Guessing game questions aren’t practical

Consider Stack Exchange’s first rule of questions not to ask:

You should only ask practical, answerable questions based on actual problems that you face. Chatty, open-ended questions diminish the usefulness of our site and push other questions off the front page.

A half-remembered description of something you vaguely recall is not what I’d call a practical, answerable question.

Unless the asker has demonstrated a practical reason they need to find this, documented that they’ve invested substantial effort in finding it, and given us something concrete that provides us with a reasonable chance of actually guessing the answer — it’s simply Not a Real Question. At best it is a game show trivia contest.

2. Guessing game questions don’t help others

Because these questions are based on vague, broad, half-remembered descriptions, it is unlikely anyone else will be able to find them through a web search. I have a difficult time imagining how you’d construct a web search, either on Google or via Stack Exchange’s built-in search, to find something that you can’t fully articulate. What’s even worse is that these questions, by their very nature, will contain a bunch of broad, speculative “maybe it’s like…” catch-all terms that are likely to trip up future visitors who end up there by accident.

Consider the example of Netstorm: Islands at War, a game so apparently difficult to remember that our gaming site contains no less than three exact duplicate identify-this-game questions about it:

The goal of Stack Exchange is not to construct un-findable single-serving questions that only help one person, but that’s exactly what guessing game questions tend to do.

3. Guessing game questions are unfair

If we allow vague and insubstantial questions, we are explicitly opening the door to “do my work for me” questions (or worst case, Yahoo Answers) — no need to expend effort, do research, provide examples … just explain in vague, broad terms what it is you partially remember and we’ll do the rest of the hard work necessary to figure it out for you? That’s a dangerous precedent to set. It is disproportionate and unfair to the experts on the site.

Also, an expert in the topic should be able to have at least some confidence that the answer he’s writing answers the question. Take that away, and you’re left with questions that don’t know what they want, and answerers throwing guesses at it hoping one will stick. “Is it mentor?” Nope, try again! “Is it Star Fighter XXIV: The Star Fightening!” Sorry, go fish!

4. Guessing game questions aren’t educational

I understand that it’s sometimes fun to guess what someone is thinking of. I also appreciate that it takes a lot of expertise and deep domain knowledge to take a vague, half-remembered description and nail the exact thing. But I would also argue that these questions aren’t educational in any way, because there’s no way to learn about the process of discovery. A particular community member, by virtue of their experience in the field, just happens to be able to take the limited information you remembered and fill in enough of the blanks to guess the correct answer.

I urge you to click on the guessing game tags yourself and take a long, hard look at the artifacts these guessing game questions are producing. After a year I am convinced that guessing game questions do not meet our goal of making the Internet better.

Quite the opposite, in fact.

* and when your site’s most popular tag is “book-recommendation”, there are perhaps deeper problems to contend with.

Stack Exchange’s Greatest Hits

02-24-12 by Jeff Atwood. 11 comments

We have a lot of Q&A sites in the Stack Exchange network now. 84 at the current moment. That’s … a lot of Q&A sites. But most people* don’t find us by browsing the site directory; they find us by encountering a Stack Exchange page in their web search results.

So that may lead you to wonder: what are the most freqently found questions on a given Stack Exchange Q&A site? In other words, the “Greatest Hits” of that particular topic.



(Trivia: did you know that the Eagles’ Greatest Hits doesn’t include their most famous song?)

How do we, as community members, tell which questions are getting the most airplay, are the figurative “Bicycling’s Greatest Hits” or “RPG’s Greatest Hits” of our community? We have a page for this:

stackoverflow.com/questions/greatest-hits
superuser.com/questions/greatest-hits
serverfault.com/questions/greatest-hits
gaming.stackexchange.com/questions/greatest-hits
askubuntu.com/questions/greatest-hits
apple.stackexchange.com/questions/greatest-hits

Yep, just add /questions/greatest-hits to the address bar of any Stack Exchange site.

The [Greatest Hits page] divides the number of page views on a question by the total amount of anonymous question and answer feedback received (adding a bonus for high view counts). We exclude questions with less views than the median view count for the entire site.

For better or worse, these questions are what the world will see and remember your site for, and a big reason why popularity can be surprisingly troublesome.

We haven’t been publicizing the Greatest Hits page much to date because it relies heavily on a feature we only introduced about 6 months ago: anonymous user feedback. If you visited a Stack Exchange question as an anonymous user, there wasn’t much you could do other than answer it. So we added a feedback option under each post.

What we quickly learned is that anonymous users aren’t particularly, uh … talkative. Statistically speaking, they very rarely click these feedback buttons — and when they do, it’s often because the post itself is getting a lot of views. So you need quite a bit of time before you can even begin looking at anonymous user feedback, and it’s frequently only useful on large sites, or the super popular questions.

We now have a reasonable amount of anonymous user feedback after 6+ months. Enough to take action. We ought to be looking at the Greatest Hits for our sites every so often and actively tending to these highly visible questions and answers — because they truly represent how the world sees your site!

I sometimes go through and “touch up” the questions on the Greatest Hits list to make sure they’re as great as they should be. I’d encourage everyone in the community to do the same. Periodically check the Greatest Hits and see if these questions should represent what your site is all about; edit, vote, comment, and flag to ensure that the quality and relevancy of these questions and answers is making your site look as great to the outside world as you know it is.

Remember, if you’re not careful, you could end up like Chuck Berry — a rock legend who will forever be remembered for his only number one hit … “My Ding-A-Ling”.

* this is hardly new news, but for the year of 2011, Google delivered 91% of all incoming traffic to Stack Overflow. It’s not quite as high for Stack Exchange, “only” around 70-80%.

So You Want To Be a Developer (Part 1)

02-15-12 by David Fullerton. 5 comments

A few months ago we had James Portnow of Extra Credits on the podcast.  We’re huge fans of everything that they’re doing over at Extra Credits, so when they asked us to help them write an episode on programming, we jumped at the opportunity.  Here’s the link:

Extra Credits: So You Want To Be a Developer (Part 1)

If you’ve never heard of Extra Credits, it’s a weekly show about the video game industry from the perspective of people who actually work in it.  It’s a fascinating look into game craftsmanship — not just how video games are made, but what makes them work, what games do well and not so well, and the effects that they have on people.  They talk a lot about about game elements and using them for good and not evil, which is something that we think a lot about with Stack Exchange.

The episode we helped them write is called So You Want To Be a Developer.  It’s part of a loose series of episodes on the jobs involved in making games and how to be awesome at them.  They’ve previously done episodes on game designers and producers, and wanted to do one on developers but didn’t have any direct experience with development.  That’s where we came in.

The episode ended up being a two-parter, because apparently we gave them way too much material to fit into one episode.  You can check out part 1 now, and come back next week for part 2.

Stack Exchange Keyboard Shortcuts

02-08-12 by Jeff Atwood. 4 comments

Scott Hanselman’s article about keyboard shortcuts and web sites reminded me that I inexplicably forgot to blog about our very own totally awesome set of keyboard shortcuts for Stack Exchange!

While we haven’t yet integrated keyboard shortcuts into the core site, the Stack Exchange Official Keyboard Shortcuts browser script is explicitly supported and actively maintained by us (mostly through the hard work of Ben and Rebecca).

If you’re a website keyboard type of guy or gal, give it a shot. There’s a nice, friendly tag wiki on how to install browser scripts on the Stack Apps scripts tab, but for convenience I’ve included the direct links to install below:

After installing (and possibly restarting/refreshing), pressing ? should get you started.

There are lots of other cool Stack Exchange scripts on Stack Apps, and of course we have a full-blown API for accessing Stack Exchange sites that just went to version 2.0. Check ‘em out!