site title

Topic: stackexchange

Election participation badges

06-08-12 by Shog9. 20 comments

The 2012 Stack Overflow moderator election is off to a good start, with 15 candidates and just under three days left for nominations. Elections are a fairly mature feature of Stack Exchange at this point (Role-playing Games has one in progress now as well), but Stack Overflow remains the largest and I dare say most interesting: with so many members involved (and so many more potentially affected by the outcome) every part of the system is put through the wringer… Including the candidates and voters themselves!

Given the importance Stack Exchange places on community governance and by extension moderator elections, it’s sort of curious that we never formally recognized this participation. You could get badges for voting on questions and answers, but when it came to the elections we didn’t need no stinkin’ badges

That’s really kind of a shame. Here in the US, it’s common to at least get a sticker when voting, a token to wear the rest of the day in recognition of your civic-mindedness. Starting today, we’ll be handing out virtual stickers – badges – for visiting and voting:

  • The Caucus Badge is awarded for visiting the election page. This is important at every stage of the process, as even during the nomination phase comment discussions helps to flesh out the nominations. If you can’t vote, you can at least make your voice heard. This is a bronze badge.Visited an election during any phase of an active election. This badge can be awarded multiple times
  • The Constituent Badge is awarded for voting - at least once - in the final phase of the election. Recognizing the importance of the action it rewards, this is a silver badge.Voted for a candidate in an election. This badge can be awarded multiple times.
Both of these can be earned once for every election. Over the next day we’ll be awarding them retroactively across the network for participation in past elections; participants in current and future elections will see them within minutes of visiting / voting.

 

Can Stack Exchange Capitalize on Hot Trends?

06-04-12 by Sam Brand. 19 comments

Hello. Sam Brand here. For those of you who don’t know me, I’m part of the CHAOS at Stack Exchange. I handle certain “special projects” across the network, oversee syndication, and occasionally poke my head into our communities to make sure our platform works to deliver killer content to the outside world. A couple weeks ago, I embarked upon one of these experiments.

What I did

Each day of the week (May 7 – May 11) I dropped into Google Trends: Hot Searches to find a buzzy keyword about which I could ask a question at one of our sites. I did this mostly out of curiosity; I’d never used the vast majority of our 85 sites. Who are the experts at our biology site? How might some of these communities react to a noob? A small part of this experiment was dogfooding to better acquaint myself with the product and communities that it’s my job to know. But that was just a small part…

The bigger goal was to see how equipped our network is to take advantage of the  most popular, topical keywords on earth. You know, the keywords me, you, your mom and your de-friended friends are most likely to plug into a search field at any given time — keywords like “Dancing with the Stars,” “National Donut Day,” “Barack Obama” and “Facebook” — the most popular search term on earth.

Stack Exchange, of course, was built for the long-tail. We thrive on questions that only a few of you have. But that doesn’t mean our communities can’t generate pieces of widely-appealing, high-quality content, and do so happily. Right? Just because something’s “hot” now doesn’t mean it won’t be useful to a Google Goggler on his hoverboard in the distant future. Or does it?

Here’s what resulted when I asked six “hot” questions across six sites over five days:

  1. Monday, May 7 - ”Facebook IPO“ - Personal Finance & Money - I am a small retail investor. Can I invest in the Facebook IPO at the IPO price? [Closed]
  2. Tuesday, May 8 - ”Where the Wild Things Are“ - Skeptics - Does ‘Where the Wild Things Are’ frighten children to a degree that author Maurice Sendak failed to comprehend? [Closed]
  3. Wednesday, May 9 - ”Great Pacific Garbage Patch“ - Biology - Is the “Great Pacific Garbage Patch” beneficial for marine wildlife?
  4. Wednesday, May 9 - ”Barack Obama” & ”Same-Sex Marriage“ - History - Barack Obama is the first US President to support same-sex marriage. But who was the first head of government in human history to do so?
  5. Thursday, May 10 - ”Wolfenstein 3D“ - Gaming - Wolfenstein 3D is now available for free online. But is this version any different than the original?
  6. Friday, May 11 - ”Flesh-Eating Bacteria“ - The Outdoors - What can an injured person in the outdoors do to prevent infection by flesh-eating bacteria?

Click through, or take my word for it when I tell you : Creating high-quality content (based around hot keywords or not) is a challenge.

Asking is a challenge. (Quick! Come up with a clever question about Chagas Disease. Go!) Answering is a challenge. (We are very aware how much work our users put into helping others.) There is no silver bullet when it comes creating smart niche content or newsstand-quality content that your aunt wants to read while she gets a perm in a hair chair.

However…

At some of our sites content creation is more difficult than at others. Skeptics, where I asked my second question, might be the most difficult site to engage on our network. The site is accessible to everyone (Cats!), but the community asks that you become familiar with some strict ground rules before jumping in (Cats AND science!).

I didn’t play by the rules when I asked question #2 (a pointless, overwrought question, I admit) and my question got shuttered. I can live with this. Stack Exchange can live with this. In this case, it’s not a too-strict FAQ or a crabby moderator preventing us from adding to the Internet; It’s me. Hate the player, not game played at Skeptics, a site that consistently churns out Q&A leagues more rigorous than any other user-generated content on the net. It is the site’s strict ground rules that enable it to do so.

However…

Sometimes a site’s rules can get in the way of creating the sort of topical content that would make the net a better place. What happened with Question #1 illustrates this well. A couple Mondays ago, investing in Facebook seemed like a pretty good idea. So, like thousands of others I googled: “How can I invest in Facebook’s IPO?” What resulted were a jumble of links that referred to E-Trade’s involvement in the initial public offering, but no stories that told me directly whether I was eligible to bid on the shares at the IPO price. I just wanted an answer. So I took the query to our Personal Finance site, where the question was quickly closed. The reason for the closure? A similar question had previously been asked at the site, but about Skype’s IPO. Needless to say, Skype is not Facebook, and neither question will ever answer anyone’s question about getting in on any upcoming IPOs. Lacking a canonical answer, this is a case where a site should really learn to love the duplicates.

Q: So, what can we do? How can Stack Exchange improve in cases like these when a good question with a hot proper noun gets shut down?

A: Vote to reopen. Not enough rep? Ask your friends to vote to reopen. Flag for moderator attention. And make your case in the comments. If you want an expert answer, put in a little work to deserve it.

Our moderators, like new users, can use a little poking and prodding. They own the sites as much as you or I. But more than anyone, they can make sites change (Server Fault’s FAQ went through a pretty radical change just this past February).

Conclusion

Lest you think all my hot topic assaults were for naught, think again. Check out our biology site for a comprehensive answer to my question about the “Great Pacific Garbage Patch.” Read here to protect yourself from “flesh-eating bacteria.”  Look here to find out which modern head of state first sanctioned gay marriage. As for Wolfenstein 3D… Several weeks after asking, nobody has yet found any difference between the classic game and the free web-based version. That’s the verdict, for now. Maybe in the future, someone wearing Google Goggles will come along and leave a more definitive answer.

Encyclopedia Stack Exchange

05-21-12 by Joel Spolsky. 38 comments

Remember this old picture?

Wiki Blog Digg Reddit Forum Venn Diagram

What’s that “Blog” circle supposed to be about, you ask? WHERE’S THE BLOGGING?

Since Stack Overflow launched, we’ve been trying to explain that it’s not just a Q&A platform: it’s also a place where you can publish things that you’ve learned: recipes, FAQs, HOWTOs, walkthroughs, and even bits of product documentation, as long you format it as a question and answer.

As Jeff wrote:

  • if you have a question that you already know the answer to
  • if you’d like to document it in public so others (including yourself) can find it later
  • it is OK to ask, and answer, your own question on a relevant Stack Exchange site.

For a long time we’ve been pleading for people to write more canonical answers so the same questions don’t keep coming up again and again, and we even have the Self-Learner badge which you can only earn by answering your own question. Still, I’m not sure if the message is getting through to everyone, as evidenced by the misguided comments that sprout up whenever someone answers their own question.

How can we make this any clearer? Maybe a big bold checkbox will help.Answer Your Own Question Checkbox

Now when you ask a question, you’ll see that checkbox right there, reminding you of the option to answer your question on the spot. Furthermore, the answer will be published at the same time as the question, avoiding that awkward moment where well-meaning people rush in to answer something you’ve already got an answer for.

It’s just a tiny checkbox that doesn’t change the mechanics of Stack Exchange in any way, but we have a bold goal for this new feature: we’re trying to move even more of the world’s long-tail, detailed knowledge into Stack Exchange. It works for all 83 sites (and their metas), you get to keep the reputation you earn, and you’ll get a lot more eyeballs than you can get on your blog (no offense… even my blog doesn’t get 24,300,000 monthly uniques).

Revamped Notifications

05-21-12 by Kevin Montrose. 16 comments

About a year and half ago we introduced the Global Inbox, that lovely little red number our analytics tell us everybody loves.

 

 

We’re fiercely protective of the inbox, making sure only actionable things directed at you go into it.  Comments, answers, a handful of post notices, Stack Overflow Careers messages, and the like.  That’s why that little red number is so loved, clicking it shows you awesome, interesting things as a rule.

However, since day one we’ve had a another class of general information notifications, badge awards, revisions, election announcements, and so on.  Stuff that’s good to know, but not always stuff you can respond to.

And here’s how we’ve always displayed those notifications:

 

 

 

If that’s not bad enough, notifications make you dismiss every, single, one - while the Global Inbox is a one-click, friction-less dismiss.  This means that it’s more work to go through your less interesting messages.

This is obviously all out of whack, so we’ve completely reworked the notification system, cribbing liberally from the well received Global Inbox:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Notifications are now…

  • …a tab in the Stack Exchange Genuine dropdown
  • …global: get a badge on Stack Overflow and you’ll see the notice on Gaming
  • …dismissed with one click, just like the inbox
  • …available historically: the last 45 are available, rather than disappearing forever once read

Since notifications aren’t as important as inbox notices, whenever you have unread inbox messages we’ll display the red inbox indicator rather than the gray notification indicator.  Of course, once you open the drop down you’ll see that you also have new notifications.

Hopefully this notification change removes just a bit of friction from using your favorite Stack Exchange sites. I know I for one won’t miss Big Slidy Orange one bit.

Be aware that we’ve also culled and collapsed some notifications types in recent months, aiming to keep our sites annoyance free.

When a Site Grows Quiet

04-25-12 by Shog9. 42 comments

In the lifecycle of a Stack Exchange site, we’ve long held the philosophy that “it takes as long as it takes” to build a sustainable community:

How long can a site stay in beta?

The simple answer is, it takes as long as it takes. We’ll wait. If a site needs more activity, go out and evangelize it. As long as your site shows steady progress and continues to make the Internet a better place to get expert answers to your questions, it will march on.

But when a site struggles to maintain any semblance of steady progress — when it’s struggling to garner an audience, a healthy core of experts, and a steady stream of questions — it becomes increasingly unlikely that the site will find a core audience to sustain it.

Next week, we’re shutting down six sites that fall into this category:

  • Astronomy
  • Economics
  • Literature
  • Firearms
  • Healthcare IT
  • Theoretical Physics

There’s nothing inherently wrong with these topics, or with the good folk who put time and effort into trying to make them work. They will likely make great Stack Exchange sites… someday. But so far, the network just hasn’t been able to provide these sites with the audience they need to make them work. Maybe they’ll find a niche on a different site, or be reborn at some later date as the Stack Exchange audience continues to grow. But for now, we’re shuttering the windows before they’re broken.

The knowledge that went into these sites is not lost. In keeping with our promise not to hoard what was given freely, all content on closed sites will be available for download from the Area 51 page corresponding to each site, in the same format and with the same open license as the data dumps for graduated sites.

We’ve always been reluctant to close a site once it entered public beta. These were difficult choices, as many people are fond of these subjects. Still, we’ve been somewhat remiss in not taking action sooner.

If it’s of any consolation, we have learned a lot from watching these sites grow and evolve. We are hard at work on a next-generation Area 51, with the goal of making site creation easier, faster and more educational: one of the most frequent stumbling blocks for new sites has been the learning curve for folks unfamiliar with Stack Exchange – providing them with help and guidance is key to creating a vibrant, healthy site.

Thank you all for the the knowledge and hard work you’ve poured into these sites. Because of it, someday there will be a site on astronomy… and economics… and literature… and the rest. Stronger and better than ever.