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Topic: stackexchange

Winter Bash 2012 Conclusion: Boxing Day

01-08-13 by Aarthi Devanathan. 15 comments

So. We’ve torn through the advent calendar, tossed aside all the wrapping paper, and (hopefully) obsessively screencapped our gravatars wearing various kinds of silly hats. As of last Friday, Winter Bash 2012 is officially over!

This event was awesome. We had a total of 46,710 users participating across 76 sites, and we gave away 108,924 hats total. The most common hat was the And I Feel Fine hat, which 23,171 users earned for activity on December 21st. The least common hat earned was I Do Say, which was obtained by Bohemian, on Stack Overflow, and kalina, on Arqade for posting an epic 30 up-voted questions. Lots and lots of us were able to find all 7 unlockable secret hats, and a few even found an eighth. Well done!

Sadly, all good things must come to an end. We’ve packed up the hats (and archived the JavaScript) until next time. For now, you’ll be able to see the hats you won (and Jin’s excellent artwork) on http://winterba.sh. If you’re curious to see what hats other people earned, check out the leaderboard.

I really loved seeing how you all got creative in making your gravatars work with the hats — some of which were comically large! Below are a very small number of the hats I enjoyed seeing. There were just too many hats I liked; I have tons and tons of screencaps of users wearing hats in fun, funny, cool, and/or interesting ways.

On some sites, even the Community ♦ user got into the spirit of things:

The best surprise (aside from the little blue circle letting me know I’d gotten another hat!) was seeing users I didn’t expect to enjoy hats sporting all sorts of interesting looks. Since Stack Overflow in particular tends to have a stronger “professional” focus, I tend to forget that folks who are passionate about their work get just as passionate about having fun now and again. Seeing some top users from all over the network equipping headgear, well, it caught me off guard and made me smile.

Several of you also found the “easter egg” on the Winter Bash site — holding down Ctrl and collecting all the falling snowflakes revealed a snowy pink unicorn!

Real Data

One of the things I wanted to look into is how a temporary, high-profile badge can alter behaviors. While some users have mentioned that they stuck around more, was this true at large?

The data are not really clear. Sites with a very high hats-to-users ratio saw serious increases in posts created during this time, visits, and general positive responses from traffic. Straw polls of the moderation teams would seem to indicate that general site upkeep (things like flags, edit queues, and other mod-actions) held stable. Anecdotally, the review queues seemed extra empty, though whether that was because fewer folks were around the sites or because everyone really wanted Le Magritte isn’t clear.

I know I consider this event a real success! It’s been a pleasure seeing everyone get excited, wear silly headgear, and just generally loosen up a bit as the year drew to a close.

Special thanks to Stack Exchange developers Emmett and balpha for building this and keeping it running smoothly, to VP of Engineering David Fullerton for coordination, guidance and encouragement, and to the aforementioned Jin for the beautiful design work.

The Future of Hats

I definitely want to try for some things for the next time:

  • Hats in chat has been requested before. I’d like to push for this for next year.
  • Site-specific hats would be super cool. Some sites unofficially got a hat — Seasoned Advice and Home Improvement — but I’d love to see more sites get their own bespoke hats.
  • More hats! Secret hats seemed to get people the most excited — adding more of those to the batch next year strikes me as a very good idea.

If you have suggestions or feedback about Winter Bash, please feel free to answer this post. I’m going to keep an eye on it, and gather ideas and improvements for next year from your responses.

When we first tried out this idea on Arqade, it wasn’t entirely clear this would be well-received elsewhere. But, based on what I’ve seen these past few weeks, I don’t think we’ve seen the last of Hats on Stack Exchange.

Welcome to Winter Bash 2012!

12-18-12 by Aarthi Devanathan. 21 comments

It’s been an amazing year for Stack Exchange, both as a network of experts and enthusiasts and as an organization. We launched twenty new sites, rolled out tons of user-requested features, and are helping 99% more visitors get answers than we were a year ago.

Last year, we celebrated the holidays on Gaming with Hat Dash, where users collected virtual hats by doing various (good, helpful) things on the site. They were sort of like festive, temporary badges (and, like badges, borrowed another good idea from the XBox – earning the ability to customize your avatar).

The response from that event was so positive, we decided to extend that to the entire network1 this holiday season.

Welcome to Winter Bash 2012!

What is Winter Bash?

From 19 December to 4 January you’ll be able to decorate your gravatar with a special hat. The hats used on Arqade smelled a bit funny, so we made up an all-new set of hats for you to earn this year. In fact, many of these “hats” aren’t even hats! There are sunglasses, moustaches, masks and other assorted headgear.

Each hat has different criteria to unlock it, and there are even some secret hats that you won’t find out about until you happen to stumble across them accidentally.


Hats show up all over the site, wherever your gravatar is shown (well, except for a few places where they didn’t fit, like chat). To change which hat you’re wearing, or to admire your lovely hat collection, just visit http://winterba.sh or check out your user page:

You’ll also get a notification when you earn a new item:

For all those of you who really hate hats, there’s an “I hate hats” link in the Winter Bash dropdown. But give it a shot before you turn it off — you might find a hat you like!

Check out the Winter Bash FAQ for more details.

Why are we doing this?

Because it’s fun, and we love fun – at least, constructive fun, in moderation, at the end of a long, exciting and eventful year. Also, hats are awesome.2


1Well. Only those sites that opted to participate. You must opt-in on Stack Overflow.

2 Please note: virtual hats do not protect against the harmful rays of the sun – always wear sunscreen!

AskPatents.com: A Stack Exchange To Prevent Bad Patents

09-20-12 by Joel Spolsky. 75 comments

We’ve all heard the stories of seemingly trivial patents being used to mug technology companies. There was the patent on the “Interactive Web” which a troll named Eolas used to extract $521 million from Microsoft–until a jury in East Texas threw out the patents. There are the four patents Lodsys is using to send threatening letters to software developers everywhere–trivial patents that Google says never should have been granted, in fact, Google and Oracle have submitted mountains of prior art to show that the patents should be invalid.

Many small app developers have just decided it’s cheaper to settle rather than spend half a million dollars in legal fees fighting in court.

What’s going on here? And what can we do to stop it?

Yes, it's a patent for giant gummy bearsAnybody who follows patent applications closely and who understands technology may have noticed something odd about a lot of the new patents: they don’t really seem like inventions. Really? They got a patent on that? I wrote that in eighth grade. In BASIC. On a TRS-80. Isn’t a patent supposed to be an invention?

Yes. But the escalation of the patent wars has led companies to try to patent everything in sight, so they can build up a portfolio of patents (“to defend themselves,” of course, so that they have something to countersue with when they get sued). The way they do this is by sending lawyers up and down the corridors where the engineers are working, looking for things that they might be able to patent. And the imperative to get a lot of patents means that sometimes they submit things which aren’t exactly inventions per se to the USPTO. Just in case they stick.

Now, the patent office works hard, but in order to determine if something is not an invention, they have to find prior art.

Prior art could be another patent, something in a publication, or even an implementation, like a shareware software program from 1992 that does the same thing that somebody is now claiming to have invented in 2008. It can be published anywhere in the world, in any language, in any publication, no matter how obscure, to qualify as prior art.

And, as you might guess, in the 22.5 hours [DOC] that examiners might have to review each patent application, searching every document published in the entire world in every language is not practical. There’s no possible way examiners can conduct a truly exhaustive search of prior art.

And that’s how we get bad patents.

Luckily, we got two breaks.

The first break we got is a tiny provision in the America Invents Act, the “Patent Reform Act” which, on the face of it, appears to have done absolutely nothing to solve this problem, but if you look closely, there’s a tiny provision in there, which says:

“Any person at any time may cite to the Office in writing prior art consisting of patents or printed publications which that person believes to have a bearing on the patentability of any claim of a particular patent…”

In other words, as of September 16, the USPTO is required to accept submissions from the public of prior art.

The second lucky break is that we have a very good Director at the USPTO right now, David Kappos. Mr. Kappos, who came from IBM, realized that this provision gave the public an opportunity to help patent examiners identify prior art. But it’s not enough just to allow prior art submissions… you have to find a way to get the public involved in looking through patent applications and trying to find prior art that could prevent bogus claims.

And that sounds a lot like… a Stack Exchange!

We humbly submit that it’s a testament to how good the Director of the USPTO is, that he actually came to us. We were not paying attention. He came–twice!–to the Stack Exchange office in New York City to encourage us to open a Stack Exchange site that would generate heaps of prior art to help the patent examiners do their jobs.

AskPatents LogoAsk Patents is a new Stack Exchange site launching today that allows anyone to participate in the patent examination process. It’s a collaborative effort, supported by Stack Exchange, the US Patent and Trademark Office, and the Google Patent Search team. It’s very exciting, because it is opening up a process that has been conducted behind closed doors for over 200 years.

Our hope is that Ask Patents will reduce the number of patents mistakenly granted for obvious, unoriginal non-inventions, especially around software, a field that is near and dear to us.

Ask Patents is a collaborative effort, neatly tagged by keywords and classification, and searchable by patent application number. It is inspired by a research project called Peer To Patent, run out of New York Law School. That pilot project, created by Professor Beth Noveck, proved very successful at identifying prior art that the USPTO wouldn’t otherwise have known about.

Citizen volunteers and other interested parties will be able to ask about applications that they think are suspicious. Others can answer, identifying possible prior art, and using our upvote/downvote feature to rate any examples of prior art that other people found.

The USPTO, complying with the new law, will also provide an online system for submitting prior art. We’re also integrating with Google Patent Search, so every patent application on Google will include a link to discussion on Stack Exchange. Google has also implemented an algorithmic prior art search utility that will be helpful to site participants.

On Ask Patents, participants can also ask and answer questions about the nuances of patent law or about specific patent applications.

Collectively, we’re building a crowd-sourced worldwide detective agency to track down and obliterate bogus patent applications. Over time, we hope that the Patent Stack Exchange will mitigate the problems caused by rampant patent trolling. It’s not a complete fix, but it’s a good start.

Stack Exchange is not a forum: the role of “niceness” on a Q&A site

08-08-12 by Shog9. 184 comments

It’s been a few weeks now since Joel kicked off our “summer of love”. There’ve been some excellent discussions in the blog comments and on Meta, and we’ve tried to present some hard data on how objectively “nice” we are. But it’s high time to talk about what place “niceness” really has on Stack Exchange. And to do that, we need to start by talking about you:

You, sir, are a jackass.

And that’s ok.

Stack Overflow wasn’t created to be some utopian ideal of peace and love. When Jeff & Joel set out to create this system, they knew full well the sort of problems that face online communities: noisy conversations obscuring real information, preferential behavior toward those in the right cliques, bickering, rudeness…

The rules we’ve created, the tools we have at our disposal, the very nature of certain features on the sites – these are all engineered to mitigate the problems that inevitably result from throwing a bunch of jackasses together in one place.

Stack Overflow people are nice because we’re good at cleaning up after ourselves… And staying focused on what’s really important.

Civility is a tool for communication, not a weapon for order

You might think you hang out on SO because people are nice there, but if Stack Overflow was full of very nice, impeccably polite misinformation… It wouldn’t be a valuable resource for professional programmers. It’d be more like some elaborate geek troll.

It’s good to keep politeness in mind when writing, as your tone can distract readers from your message. It’s great to have something approaching real data on how “nice” we are. But in the end, this sort of navel-gazing misses the point: we’re not here to pat each other on the back and hand out gold stars, much less waggle our fingers at the jackasses – we’re here to share the knowledge of our craft.

Stop and think for a moment about the nicest person you’ve met on Stack Exchange. Chances are, it wasn’t the guy who greeted you by name when you signed on – it was the one who answered your first question, convinced you to clarify what you were asking, and calmly pointed out your misconceptions before pointing you to a solution.

Rudeness as a defense against vampires

As a traditional forum evolves over time, insular rudeness becomes the weapon of choice against the invading hordes, an immune response by the organism toward infection from outsiders. This is only marginally effective, since the most dangerous invaders have long ago developed a resistance to it. Eventually, rudeness becomes institutionalized, to the point where members start to drive away everyone – including each other. It’s a natural progression. And on Stack Exchange, it’s entirely unnecessary.

Everyone loves to quote from the FAQ’s etiquette section, particularly the first “be nice” bit. But it’s the last section that has all the action items:

Be honest.
Above all, be honest. If you see misinformation, vote it down. Add comments indicating what, specifically, is wrong. Provide better answers of your own. Best of all — edit and improve the existing questions and answers!

Tired of seeing crappy questions? Close them. Irritated by lousy answers? Down-vote them. Depressed by the meaningless junk that some people post whenever they see an empty text field? Delete it! Embarrassed by poor grammar or formatting? Edit it! See someone being rude? Flag it! All of these tools exist, and we’re working hard on making them better and more effective.

So when you can cast a vote and go on with your life, why would you waste your time ranting? It’s that old message board mentality creeping in. When you leave a comment, recognize that you’re now walking the line between a Q&A site and a traditional forum. If you aren’t actively trying to help someone learn, you’re not helping to defend the realm - you’re just being a jackass.

The choice here isn’t between being nice and being right. You can be nice each and every time you guide someone to the right answer or the correct behavior, and doing so is not only better for the community morale, it’s also more effective. That doesn’t take a welcoming committee, it’s something anyone can do. Even jackasses like me and you.

The Hunting of the Snark

07-31-12 by Joel Spolsky. 130 comments

You can’t fix what you can’t measure, so the first thing we did as a part of our Summer of Love campaign was try to measure friendliness in an objective and repeatable way. We gathered 7000 comments from Stack Overflow and submitted them to Mechanical Turk. For each comment, we asked 20 people to rate the comment as Friendly, Unfriendly, or “Neutral/Unclear.”

There are different ways of massaging the data, but I do want to give you a flavor for the kind of comments we’re talking about when we’re talking about unfriendly comments. Here is a snapshot of the complete results, showing comments where 95% of the reviewers rated a comment as unfriendly (warning, if there are any kids in the area, you may want to send them away):

  • Can you not google?!
  • Dean, don’t be a f___ing lamer. You clearly don’t have the slightest clue of what your ass…
  • Neurofluxation, haha f___ you should be f___ you kid
  • try to give answers. you baby kid shut up your mouth. this is forum to share problems not …
  • yea a__hole im saying send me the code
  • This is not correct, for many reasons, many of which were pointed out by plinth below. I d…
  • @Rich, It is clear (and always was clear) that you don;t care about what anybody else thin…
  • could you please stop reposting all your questions 4 times?
  • You know, I really dislike the attitude here that a question can only be asked once.
  • @cee: And rolling back is not intended to solve whatever gripes you may have with me. If y…
  • Now you’re just proving your douchiness.  Editing your question to hide your true intent, …
  • man, you guys have no sense of humor.  I don’t see how hundreds of idiotic and non-program…
  • NO. GOD. these comments are getting irritating.
  • Indeed. Although demonstrating a severe lack of ability to ask questions is a bad start.
  • I mean, really, WTF?
  • Don’t vote down, the sooner I sabotage this the sooner we can tell the client f___ you and…
  • @TheTXI: That’s exactly my point. If the person actually bothered to *google* the damn que…
  • u discuss all kind of questions here but when i ask a question and if u people are not abl…
  • @TStamper: If they haven’t bothered to look through the FAQ, what makes you think they are…
  • It’s amusing for a while, babby, but even the funniest jokes get tedious when they’re done…
  • If you’re so desperate to have your account removed why not just leave and not come back? …
  • He asks lot’s of these troll questions
  • Seriously? WFT Dude?
  • Jesus! Start fixing your question.
  • Spencer, my tone? You sir are political correctness gone mad!
  • If I said your mouse sucked, are you gonna take me out to the parking lot and fight me?  i…
  • This isn’t a programming question, it is a psychology question. It doesn’t ask for an expl…
  • @mario why in your opinion should I not link to it? Because of the 5 pageviews the site ga…
  • Rec, you are not asking a question that can be answered in the form at the bottom of this …
  • @user336502, you’re pushing your luck with cruddy questions (http://stackoverflow.com/ques…
  • Jebus, @AKA, did you even read your own question?  This is the worst piece of crap I’ve ev…
  • Jeez dont’ people read web sites. What do you think Stackoverflow careers is for? This pla…
  • Hmya, how can 4 in 5 programmers be wrong?  Or 1 in 2?  We don’t know how your brain works…
  • @M.H: Don’t blame the language because you don’t know how to use it. Don’t blame the gun w…

Of course, “friendliness” can be subjective. But when we’re talking about making Stack Overflow a friendly place, we’re not talking about being terse or even snippy — we’re talking about lighting a bag of dog poo on fire and throwing it at people.

Of 7000 comments submitted, there were 161 that were rated as “unfriendly” by 75% or more of the reviewers… that’s about 2.3%. If you browse Stack Overflow for a few minutes, it’s likely that you will come across one of these extremely unfriendly comments. Of those 2.3% extremely unfriendly comments, less than 1/5th have been deleted. Most of them are still on Stack Overflow right now.

The “friendliness” situation is much better, mainly because our reviewers tend to universally interpret thank you’s as friendly.

  • +1 This is a good question, as this programming practice is even used in some big projects. (www.ogre3D.com for ex.)
  • @Visage Haha, thanks for that
  • Great analogy, @Guffa !
  • Nice find, Chad Birch!
  • It was tagged javascript before Joel edited it. Clearly it is programming related :)
  • Thanks much for the feedback everyone
  • i wonder how did you manage to create the compoennts tag? ;) like your question +1
  • Thanks for the suggestion !
  • That’s nice.  Let us know how it goes!
  • You’re welcome…
  • hehe…that was fun!
  • Thanks, see my edit.
  • @Mike: Thank you.
  • Cool, will do that.
  • Okay, thanks all.
  • O_o That’s very cool! +1
  • @spudly – apologies, turns out the link I posted was a dud – sorry for wasting your time!
  • Love the question.  What you’re after is domain knowledge which is exactly the type of information that a company guards because it’s a barrier to entry to blokes in garages writing television clients :)
  • Cool. thank you!
  • Ha! I didn’t even catch it in your post. :)
  • LOVING all the images that have been added :-)
  • thanks.. thats exactly what I was looking for :)
  • Thanks everyone
  • @meagar wow that looks awesome! I’m only about a several hour drive from there, I’ll see if I can make it. Juggling for the win!!! :)

Of 7000 comments submitted, 557 were rated as “friendly” by 75% of more of the reviewers.

I think this proves that the methodology is reasonably sound. I think everyone can agree that the Mechanical Turk reviewers, who were shown comments out of context and who probably did not know anything about our site (all they knew was that it was a “programmer’s discussion forum”), did, nevertheless, produce results that seem to agree with how we, inside the community, would judge the comments. That gives me confidence that we have a reliable measure of friendliness that we can track.

There’s a lot of other interesting stuff in the data, so here’s an Excel workbook containing the raw data and friendliness ratings.