site title

Topic: stackexchange

Winter Bash 2014

12-14-14 by Jon Ericson. 26 comments

There is no better antidote, at least for the worst hours and eclipses of the soul, than to conjure up …
serious frivolity.—Friedrich Nietzsche

Winter Bash 2014

What’s Winter Bash again?

No, it’s not a new flavor of Unix shell. Rather, Winter Bash is an ancient tradition of Stack Exchange. (2011 is ancient according to Internet time.) Here’s how it works:

  1. Starting right now, when you complete one of 30-odd challenges while logged on a participating site, you will be awarded the associated hat. To notify you, an icon will light up on the top bar. In addition, admire your hat collection on the Winter Bash 2014 site. Finally, your profile includes the number of unique snowflakes hats (You have a hat to wear!) you’ve earned all around the network.
  2. Once you acquire an item, click your avatar to pick a hat that you earned—not just on the current site, but anywhere. When you are satisfied the hat’s position, click “Wear hat” and it will be visible everywhere your avatar is displayed. Optionally, you may have a different look on each site. Once you are wearing a hat, you’ll also see an option to go unadorned. (But really, why would you want that?)

    I'm a pirate!

  3. On January 4, 2015 at 23:59:59 UTC, all hats will be returned to the Stack Exchange vault. The best way to preserve holiday memories is to take plenty of pictures before they are gone.

Again with the hats? What happened to “We hate fun”?

In the face of the darkening days of winter, we put aside our steely, businesslike frowns to wear virtual cosmetic items. It’s our solemn duty to cut out the nonsense leaving pure, unadulterated knowledge as permanent artifacts helpful to future visitors. And that task is no laughing matter.

Yet, to quote G. K. Chesterton:

About what other subjects can one make jokes except serious subjects?

The truth is, we don’t really hate fun. Contributing to a volunteer effort should be an enjoyable experience. Heck, fake internet points are integral to how these sites operate. Winter Bash reminds us that there’s more to life than nose-to-the-grindstone work and quality content. We don’t stop having fun when the event ends. We go back to having fun with a larger purpose.

Is everything going to be the same as last year?

Management gave us a clear mandate when it came to building new features into Winter Bash:

We were not allowed to spend weeks on snow animation.

Thankfully, we could reuse last year’s start-of-the-art snowfall algorithm for the official Winter Bash 2014 homepage. There you can discover a nearly* complete list of hats and how you can earn them. The activities this year are mostly fresh and (hopefully) all fun. If you could go ahead and answer 5 questions on Saturday, that’d be great. Mmmkay?

Once again, we are delighted with the work of freelance illustrator, Elias Stein. It’s difficult to express how satisfying it feels to think up a concept (Tam o’ Shanter!) and have it manifest a few days later:

Tam o' Shanter

In the past, some people have had trouble getting hats to fit properly. Last year, we added the ability to reposition hats, but that did little to satisfy folks with especially large or disembodied heads. So, this year hats can be resized and twisted to fit your head. (Thanks, balpha!)

Shog The Hunter

If you have any questions about the event, try the Frequently Asked Questions. If your question isn’t covered there, please ask it on Meta Stack Exchange, our Q&A site about our network of Q&A sites.

Before signing off, I apologize to our Southern Hemisphere friends for the name. I wanted to go with something season-neutral like HAT ATTACK or December Fling, but tradition ruled the day. Just remember: while you are sipping refreshing drinks and enjoying the sunshine, it’s cold, wet, and dark up here.

Act now and get an exclusive hat only available today!


* status-bydesign

Editing is essential: new badges and review enhancements

10-07-14 by Shog9. 34 comments

Explainer - Edited and answered 1 question (both actions within 12 hours, answer score > 0)
Refiner - Edited and answered 50 questions (both actions within 12 hours, answer score > 0)
Illuminator - Edited and answered 500 questions (both actions within 12 hours, answer score > 0)

We rolled out three new badges last week!

These recognize a pattern that sets Stack Exchange apart from the forums and message boards that came before it: answering and editing questions, the ability to not only write an answer that can be useful beyond the immediate asker but also re-write the question such that it can be found and understood by future readers. Thanks to this capability, brilliant explanations need not languish under titles such as “C++ problem” or “Java doubt” – having written an answer that ably fixed the problems in the asker’s code, it is possible to also fix the problems in his writing!

It’s no surprise then that the top editors tend to include an awful lot of the top answerers. If you’re good at writing, good enough to consistently hammer out insightful answers, you’d be a fool not to make sure the introductions to those answers – the questions being answered – were of similar quality. Yet, this seemingly-obvious technique remains unknown to many – indeed, I’ve heard some express shock at the notion that answerers would be allowed to touch the words of those whose questions they strive to interpret and address.

Well, you are allowed. And now, encouraged!

As with previous sets of badges, the bronze level exists to provide a form of “just in time” learning for new users, while the silver and gold levels offer increasingly lofty goals to strive for.

Recent changes to suggested edits

With the introduction of suggested edits, we sought to make the immense power of editing available to anyone reading the site. Instead of going into effect immediately, suggested edits required approval from some number of people who had already earned full editing privileges, thus ensuring some resistance to spammers, vandals and griefers as well as a path by which inexperienced editors could be guided by those with more exposure to community norms. However, several serious deficiencies in this system became apparent over the past few years, so we’ve now taken steps to correct them:

  1. We’re now notifying editors of past rejections when they load the edit form.

    There are some checks in place to avoid hassling folks with occasional rejections, but for a new editor whose edits are being rejected these should help them to improve before they waste too much of their time.
  2. Reviewers are given a limited period of exclusivity for edits they’re reviewing, during which the edit won’t be assigned to anyone else for review. This should greatly reduce the frustration for conscientious reviewers, who might previously find the edit they were reviewing (or improving) already approved or rejected by the time they submitted their review.
  3. Reviewers who wish to perform edits themselves have the option of either approving and editing on top of the suggestion, or rejecting and replacing it with a different edit.

    This replaces both the previous “Improve” option, and the “too minor” rejection reason, allowing edits that make small changes while overlooking large flaws to be quickly discarded, while ensuring that truly helpful edits – even small ones – are more consistently approved. Combined with change #2, this gives a great deal more power to reviewers who are comfortable editing – and who better to review edits than editors?
  4. Finally, we’ve revamped the rest of the predefined suggested edit rejection reasons, improving their context-sensitivity and focusing more specifically on common mistakes and outright abuse.

Together, these changes should offer better guidance to both editors and reviewers, helping both work together effectively.


Big thanks to everyone who chimed in on the meta discussions linked above, as well as those who’ve repeatedly reported these problems over the past few years. Gratitude is also due to the developers who patiently worked to implement these changes, Geoff Dalgas (badges, review changes) and Kevin Montrose (edit rejection feedback). And of course, huge thanks to everyone who uses this tooling in spite of the occasional rough edges.

These changes are part of a project intended to help improve the quality of Q&A on Stack Exchange. Stay tuned for even bigger, better changes in the coming months!

Introducing Runnable JavaScript, CSS, and HTML Code Snippets

09-16-14 by David Haney. 94 comments

On Stack Overflow and our other code-related sites, creating a minimal, complete, and verifiable example is the best way to get an answer to your question. We’ve always loved JSFiddle and sites like it because they let both askers and answerers reference runnable, working code that demonstrates their problem or solution.

Unfortunately, the use of these external sites introduces a few problems:

  1. If the link breaks, the post becomes worthless.
  2. If the code isn’t embedded in the page, visitors are forced to go elsewhere to get the full content of the question or answer.
  3. Also, because the code isn’t a part of our post Markdown, changes to it don’t show up in the revision history.

The community voiced similar concerns around external sites, which eventually led us to block posts that contain links to JSFiddle and similar sites without a corresponding code block. This is an unnecessary burden for both askers and answerers.

So we’ve created our own way to embed runnable JavaScript, CSS, and HTML code blocks right in the body of a post. As of today, we’re launching “Stack Snippets,” a fully integrated feature available on Stack Overflow and any other code-related Stack Exchange sites.

How Do Stack Snippets Work?

With Stack Snippets, a code block:

Code block

Can become a runnable code block:

Runnable code block

The code will not run until you press the “Run code snippet button:

Runnable code block that has been executed

How Do I Make A Stack Snippet?

Stack Snippets work for both questions and answers. In the Markdown editor window, there’s a new button that you can click to launch the Stack Snippets editor.

The Markdown toolbar with the new Stack Snippet button

The editor appears and allows you to enter HTML, CSS, and JavaScript (or any combination of them):

The Stack Snippet editor

Once you’ve got your code working, press “Insert into Post” at the bottom and you’re done! You can test your snippet, or load it back into the Snippets editor from right in the Preview screen:

The run and edit options of Stack Snippets in the editor preview

When answering a post containing a snippet, you can easily include a modified version of the original in your answer – just click the “Copy snippet to answer” button.

Under the Hood

A great feature of Stack Snippets is that they are inserted as regular Markdown code blocks:

The actual Markdown of a Stack Snippet

This makes them instantly backwards-compatible with our normal revision history and diffs, and also any API clients including our own mobile apps.

The runnable snippets behavior is triggered by a few new HTML comments that are not rendered by Markdown. You can even edit the code right from the Markdown editor and the snippet will still be runnable.

Are Stack Snippets Safe?

Yes, as much as the web in general is safe. You are not in any more danger than you are when browsing any site with JavaScript enabled. With that said, the snippets are running client code in your browser, and you should always exercise caution when running code contributed by another user.

We isolate snippets from our sites to block access to your private Stack Exchange data:

  • We use HTML5 sandboxed iframes in order to prevent many forms of malicious attack.
  • We render the Snippets on an external domain (stacksnippets.net) in order to ensure that the same-origin policy is not in effect and to keep the snippets from accessing your logged-in session or cookies.

Like all other aspects of our site, Stack Snippets are ultimately governed by the community. Because users can still write code that creates annoying behaviors like infinite loops or pop-ups, we disable snippets on any post that is heavily downvoted (scoring less than -3 on Stack Overflow, -8 on Meta). If you see bad code that you think should be disabled, downvote the post. If you see code that is intended to be harmful (such as an attempt at phishing), you should flag it for moderator attention.

What About Other Languages?

Our initial release supports HTML, CSS, and JavaScript because questions on these topics use external code hosting sites the most frequently. These languages also run client-side in the user’s browser, making them self-contained and easy to support. Server-side languages are much more complicated and require significant infrastructure changes in order to properly implement. We don’t have any specific plans at this time to implement other languages, but it’s something we might consider in the future.

What About Sites Like JSFiddle?

You can still use sites like JSFiddle if you prefer them. JSFiddle and similar sites still have a bunch of features that we have not implemented yet. The normal rules for a link still apply: make sure you copy the relevant code into your question or answer so that it can be accessed if the external site is unavailable.

We decided to implement our own version instead of embedding a third-party site for the reasons mentioned earlier:

  • There’s no need to copy-paste the code into the post. It’s all embedded in the post automatically, so revision history and diffs just work.
  • There’s no need to visit another site to get your answer. The best experience is one where your question and answer(s) are complete and on the same page.
  • Since we host it, we can guarantee performance and up-time. We have high standards when it comes to performance and up-time, and want to make sure that the ability to run a snippet is always available.

Give Stack Snippets A Try

We’re excited to see how the community uses Stack Snippets, and looking forward to your feedback:

  • If you find bugs, or you’d like to give specific feedback on Stack Snippets, you can post on Meta Stack Exchange using the tag stack-snippets.
  • If you just want to try it out, we’ve created a sandbox on Meta Stack Exchange.
  • If you feel that a particular site should have Stack Snippets, post a feature-request on that site’s meta – if there’s support from the community there, we’ll enable them.

We’ve already started piloting it on Code Review and are seeing some neat results. Don’t hesitate to share interesting examples you come across – or create – here in the comments.

Have fun!

Winter Bash 2013 Wrap-Up

01-03-14 by Abby T. Miller. 30 comments

Another holiday season has drawn to a close. We’ve had three glorious weeks with our beloved hats. Now as we pack away the tinsel and the party horns, it’s time to put the hats back in their boxes for another year. Before we move on to 2014 with our bare heads (and our full hearts), let’s take a few moments to reminisce.

oh the memories

76,586 users from all over the network earned 214,172 hats this year – that’s just about twice the number of hats they earned last year. 95 sites opted to participate in Winter Bash, which is more than the total number of sites that simply existed during last year’s event.

The most commonly earned hat was the Old Hat, earned 74,631 times (by 35,589 distinct users). The least commonly earned public hat was Oh the Horror, earned just 46 times. And the rarest hat of all was the top-secret Don Draper, earned only 14 times across the whole network.

hat awardz

Something new we did this year was keeping the secret hats’ triggers… well, secret. Since the community asked so nicely, it’s now time to reveal the mysteries of the secret hats! In ascending order of rarity:

  • Chuck Yeager was the most commonly earned secret hat, awarded first to Óscar López - the very first user to discover a secret hat. This hat was awarded to users who answered a question within an hour of it being posted, with their answer scoring 2 or more.
  • With Great Power was awarded to moderators (elected or pro tem), former moderators, and Stack Exchange employees.
  • Those who earned three hats in a single day earned Johnny Three-hats for their trouble.
  • The Ghost of Winter Bash Past appeared only to those who earned a Necromancer badge.
  • IG-88 was a less well-known bounty hunter, and the hat that bears his name went to users who tried for a bounty, but didn’t win it.
  • I’m Not Listening was awarded to users who rejected a suggested edit on their own post.
  • For I See Your Point, users had to leave 5 comments on a site meta, each comment scoring 2 or more.
  • Before It Was Cool was awarded to forward-thinking users who asked a question with a brand new tag (that was not deleted or removed).
  • Eureka! was awarded manually by SE staff to users who correctly determined (or guessed) the trigger for any of the secret hats.
  • Don Draper, in homage to everyone’s favorite smooth-talking ad man, went to users who posted a community ad that received enough upvotes to be displayed on the site (usually 6). 

And finally, we need to send a special shout-out to the top hat earner across the entire Stack Exchange network. This user earned a whopping 44 hats – all of the hats they were eligible for, missing only With Great Power due to not being a moderator. Please join me in giving the eminent Logan M a hearty round of applause!

logan m is winnar

Honorable mention is due to Manishearth, who held the network-wide lead for almost the entire duration of Winter Bash and was only edged out in the final hours by Logan M’s 44th hat. Well done to you both!

Lastly, we send our gratitude to each and every one of our users for the tireless and high-quality work you do throughout the year, even when there aren’t any hats to earn. Winter Bash is our chance to kick off our shoes and have some fun during the holiday season, and we hope you enjoyed it! The whole Stack Exchange team wishes everyone a happy and healthy 2014. That’s all, folks!

Winter Bash 2013 is here!

12-15-13 by Abby T. Miller. 48 comments

Ahh, the wintry season…

The gatherings of family and friends, the giving and receiving of gifts, the making and/or breaking of New Year’s resolutions – however you and yours celebrate, the end of a calendar year heralds many traditions.

Here at Stack Exchange, we wanted to get each of you an awesome, personal gift, and mail it to you as our way of saying “thanks.” But our accountant pointed out that there are 4.5 million of you, which promptly reminded us that the holidays aren’t about gifts. The real spirit of the holidays can only be captured with…

header

Hats!

That’s right: Winter Bash is back for another three weeks of millinery-related holiday fun.

What’s new, you ask?

New hats:  There are over 30 new hats to earn this year (with many thanks to contract designer Elias Stein). And by “hats,” we of course mean, “things you can stick on your avatar’s face.”

6 hats

And it’s possible that there just might be a couple of secret ones, too. (By “it’s possible,” we mean  “there definitely are, because we made them, like with computer code and everything, so there’s not really much doubt whatsoever.”)

Hats are transferrable: What? No, you can’t sell them to each other. Hats are transferrable across sites! You read that correctly: this year, if you earn a hat on any site, you can wear it on any participating Stack Exchange site. This was one of our most asked-for feature requests after last year’s event, and it’s a great way for everyone to highlight their achievements on their favorite site across the network.

Hat position is adjustable on your face: You remember how crushed you were after finally earning a mustache “hat,” only to discover that on your avatar, it was basically an extremely dapper unibrow? NEVER AGAIN.

You can finally reposition hats in the box until Don Draper’s suit fits as well it fits him. (I know, I know… “it’s not a suit; it’s a carousel.” Give it a rest, Don. Not everything is a carousel.)

Winter Bash 2013 will run from Monday 16 December 2013 through Friday 3 January 2014. During that time, participate on any Stack Exchange site to earn awesome hats (and other accessories!) Each hat has a different activity to trigger it. You can see all the hats and their triggers on the Winter Bash 2013 homepage. Still have questions? Of the kind that get asked… frequently?  Check out the  Winter Bash FAQ

All the hats will go back into storage at the end of Winter Bash, so get out there, earn some hats, and show them off while you can! Just be careful. We paid a deposit on them.