site title

Topic: stackexchange

Introducing Runnable JavaScript, CSS, and HTML Code Snippets

09-16-14 by David Haney. 78 comments

On Stack Overflow and our other code-related sites, creating a minimal, complete, and verifiable example is the best way to get an answer to your question. We’ve always loved JSFiddle and sites like it because they let both askers and answerers reference runnable, working code that demonstrates their problem or solution.

Unfortunately, the use of these external sites introduces a few problems:

  1. If the link breaks, the post becomes worthless.
  2. If the code isn’t embedded in the page, visitors are forced to go elsewhere to get the full content of the question or answer.
  3. Also, because the code isn’t a part of our post Markdown, changes to it don’t show up in the revision history.

The community voiced similar concerns around external sites, which eventually led us to block posts that contain links to JSFiddle and similar sites without a corresponding code block. This is an unnecessary burden for both askers and answerers.

So we’ve created our own way to embed runnable JavaScript, CSS, and HTML code blocks right in the body of a post. As of today, we’re launching “Stack Snippets,” a fully integrated feature available on Stack Overflow and any other code-related Stack Exchange sites.

How Do Stack Snippets Work?

With Stack Snippets, a code block:

Code block

Can become a runnable code block:

Runnable code block

The code will not run until you press the “Run code snippet button:

Runnable code block that has been executed

How Do I Make A Stack Snippet?

Stack Snippets work for both questions and answers. In the Markdown editor window, there’s a new button that you can click to launch the Stack Snippets editor.

The Markdown toolbar with the new Stack Snippet button

The editor appears and allows you to enter HTML, CSS, and JavaScript (or any combination of them):

The Stack Snippet editor

Once you’ve got your code working, press “Insert into Post” at the bottom and you’re done! You can test your snippet, or load it back into the Snippets editor from right in the Preview screen:

The run and edit options of Stack Snippets in the editor preview

When answering a post containing a snippet, you can easily include a modified version of the original in your answer – just click the “Copy snippet to answer” button.

Under the Hood

A great feature of Stack Snippets is that they are inserted as regular Markdown code blocks:

The actual Markdown of a Stack Snippet

This makes them instantly backwards-compatible with our normal revision history and diffs, and also any API clients including our own mobile apps.

The runnable snippets behavior is triggered by a few new HTML comments that are not rendered by Markdown. You can even edit the code right from the Markdown editor and the snippet will still be runnable.

Are Stack Snippets Safe?

Yes, as much as the web in general is safe. You are not in any more danger than you are when browsing any site with JavaScript enabled. With that said, the snippets are running client code in your browser, and you should always exercise caution when running code contributed by another user.

We isolate snippets from our sites to block access to your private Stack Exchange data:

  • We use HTML5 sandboxed iframes in order to prevent many forms of malicious attack.
  • We render the Snippets on an external domain (stacksnippets.net) in order to ensure that the same-origin policy is not in effect and to keep the snippets from accessing your logged-in session or cookies.

Like all other aspects of our site, Stack Snippets are ultimately governed by the community. Because users can still write code that creates annoying behaviors like infinite loops or pop-ups, we disable snippets on any post that is heavily downvoted (scoring less than -3 on Stack Overflow, -8 on Meta). If you see bad code that you think should be disabled, downvote the post. If you see code that is intended to be harmful (such as an attempt at phishing), you should flag it for moderator attention.

What About Other Languages?

Our initial release supports HTML, CSS, and JavaScript because questions on these topics use external code hosting sites the most frequently. These languages also run client-side in the user’s browser, making them self-contained and easy to support. Server-side languages are much more complicated and require significant infrastructure changes in order to properly implement. We don’t have any specific plans at this time to implement other languages, but it’s something we might consider in the future.

What About Sites Like JSFiddle?

You can still use sites like JSFiddle if you prefer them. JSFiddle and similar sites still have a bunch of features that we have not implemented yet. The normal rules for a link still apply: make sure you copy the relevant code into your question or answer so that it can be accessed if the external site is unavailable.

We decided to implement our own version instead of embedding a third-party site for the reasons mentioned earlier:

  • There’s no need to copy-paste the code into the post. It’s all embedded in the post automatically, so revision history and diffs just work.
  • There’s no need to visit another site to get your answer. The best experience is one where your question and answer(s) are complete and on the same page.
  • Since we host it, we can guarantee performance and up-time. We have high standards when it comes to performance and up-time, and want to make sure that the ability to run a snippet is always available.

Give Stack Snippets A Try

We’re excited to see how the community uses Stack Snippets, and looking forward to your feedback:

  • If you find bugs, or you’d like to give specific feedback on Stack Snippets, you can post on Meta Stack Exchange using the tag stack-snippets.
  • If you just want to try it out, we’ve created a sandbox on Meta Stack Exchange.
  • If you feel that a particular site should have Stack Snippets, post a feature-request on that site’s meta – if there’s support from the community there, we’ll enable them.

We’ve already started piloting it on Code Review and are seeing some neat results. Don’t hesitate to share interesting examples you come across – or create – here in the comments.

Have fun!

Winter Bash 2013 Wrap-Up

01-03-14 by Abby T. Miller. 30 comments

Another holiday season has drawn to a close. We’ve had three glorious weeks with our beloved hats. Now as we pack away the tinsel and the party horns, it’s time to put the hats back in their boxes for another year. Before we move on to 2014 with our bare heads (and our full hearts), let’s take a few moments to reminisce.

oh the memories

76,586 users from all over the network earned 214,172 hats this year – that’s just about twice the number of hats they earned last year. 95 sites opted to participate in Winter Bash, which is more than the total number of sites that simply existed during last year’s event.

The most commonly earned hat was the Old Hat, earned 74,631 times (by 35,589 distinct users). The least commonly earned public hat was Oh the Horror, earned just 46 times. And the rarest hat of all was the top-secret Don Draper, earned only 14 times across the whole network.

hat awardz

Something new we did this year was keeping the secret hats’ triggers… well, secret. Since the community asked so nicely, it’s now time to reveal the mysteries of the secret hats! In ascending order of rarity:

  • Chuck Yeager was the most commonly earned secret hat, awarded first to Óscar López - the very first user to discover a secret hat. This hat was awarded to users who answered a question within an hour of it being posted, with their answer scoring 2 or more.
  • With Great Power was awarded to moderators (elected or pro tem), former moderators, and Stack Exchange employees.
  • Those who earned three hats in a single day earned Johnny Three-hats for their trouble.
  • The Ghost of Winter Bash Past appeared only to those who earned a Necromancer badge.
  • IG-88 was a less well-known bounty hunter, and the hat that bears his name went to users who tried for a bounty, but didn’t win it.
  • I’m Not Listening was awarded to users who rejected a suggested edit on their own post.
  • For I See Your Point, users had to leave 5 comments on a site meta, each comment scoring 2 or more.
  • Before It Was Cool was awarded to forward-thinking users who asked a question with a brand new tag (that was not deleted or removed).
  • Eureka! was awarded manually by SE staff to users who correctly determined (or guessed) the trigger for any of the secret hats.
  • Don Draper, in homage to everyone’s favorite smooth-talking ad man, went to users who posted a community ad that received enough upvotes to be displayed on the site (usually 6). 

And finally, we need to send a special shout-out to the top hat earner across the entire Stack Exchange network. This user earned a whopping 44 hats – all of the hats they were eligible for, missing only With Great Power due to not being a moderator. Please join me in giving the eminent Logan M a hearty round of applause!

logan m is winnar

Honorable mention is due to Manishearth, who held the network-wide lead for almost the entire duration of Winter Bash and was only edged out in the final hours by Logan M’s 44th hat. Well done to you both!

Lastly, we send our gratitude to each and every one of our users for the tireless and high-quality work you do throughout the year, even when there aren’t any hats to earn. Winter Bash is our chance to kick off our shoes and have some fun during the holiday season, and we hope you enjoyed it! The whole Stack Exchange team wishes everyone a happy and healthy 2014. That’s all, folks!

Winter Bash 2013 is here!

12-15-13 by Abby T. Miller. 48 comments

Ahh, the wintry season…

The gatherings of family and friends, the giving and receiving of gifts, the making and/or breaking of New Year’s resolutions – however you and yours celebrate, the end of a calendar year heralds many traditions.

Here at Stack Exchange, we wanted to get each of you an awesome, personal gift, and mail it to you as our way of saying “thanks.” But our accountant pointed out that there are 4.5 million of you, which promptly reminded us that the holidays aren’t about gifts. The real spirit of the holidays can only be captured with…

header

Hats!

That’s right: Winter Bash is back for another three weeks of millinery-related holiday fun.

What’s new, you ask?

New hats:  There are over 30 new hats to earn this year (with many thanks to contract designer Elias Stein). And by “hats,” we of course mean, “things you can stick on your avatar’s face.”

6 hats

And it’s possible that there just might be a couple of secret ones, too. (By “it’s possible,” we mean  “there definitely are, because we made them, like with computer code and everything, so there’s not really much doubt whatsoever.”)

Hats are transferrable: What? No, you can’t sell them to each other. Hats are transferrable across sites! You read that correctly: this year, if you earn a hat on any site, you can wear it on any participating Stack Exchange site. This was one of our most asked-for feature requests after last year’s event, and it’s a great way for everyone to highlight their achievements on their favorite site across the network.

Hat position is adjustable on your face: You remember how crushed you were after finally earning a mustache “hat,” only to discover that on your avatar, it was basically an extremely dapper unibrow? NEVER AGAIN.

You can finally reposition hats in the box until Don Draper’s suit fits as well it fits him. (I know, I know… “it’s not a suit; it’s a carousel.” Give it a rest, Don. Not everything is a carousel.)

Winter Bash 2013 will run from Monday 16 December 2013 through Friday 3 January 2014. During that time, participate on any Stack Exchange site to earn awesome hats (and other accessories!) Each hat has a different activity to trigger it. You can see all the hats and their triggers on the Winter Bash 2013 homepage. Still have questions? Of the kind that get asked… frequently?  Check out the  Winter Bash FAQ

All the hats will go back into storage at the end of Winter Bash, so get out there, earn some hats, and show them off while you can! Just be careful. We paid a deposit on them.

 

Five years ago, Stack Overflow launched. Then, a miracle occurred.

09-16-13 by Jay Hanlon. 549 comments

 

Stack Overflow officially launched on September 15, 2008. In five short years, you’ve answered over 5 million questions on more than 100 sites, and helped hundreds of millions of people find the answers they needed. Today, we want to celebrate how, together, we changed one small corner of the Internet for the better.

We want to hear your stories about how someone on Stack Exchange helped you.

“Then, a Miracle Occurs”

Before it went into beta, stackoverflow.com had a comic on the landing page that came to symbolize what we were setting out to do:

We knew what our goal was, and we had some idea how to start, but the entire thing working was predicated on that middle step: “then a miracle occurs”. The original vision statement was ambitious:

It is by programmers, for programmers, with the ultimate intent of collectively increasing the sum total of good programming knowledge in the world. No matter what programming language you use, or what operating system you call home. Better programming is our goal. (from Introducing Stack Overflow, emphasis added)

It was a gamble: would people really take time out of their busy lives to answer other people’s questions, for nothing more than fake internet points and bragging rights?

It turns out that people will do anything for fake internet points.

Just kidding. At best, the points, and the gamification, and the focused structure of the site did little more than encourage people to keep doing what they were already doing. People came because they wanted to help other people, because they needed to learn something new, or because they wanted to show off the clever way they’d solved a problem.

Which was lucky for us.  Because here’s the crazy secret about gamification:  In the history of the world, gamification has never gotten a single person do anything they didn’t already basically like to do.

In the midst of everyone’s individual reason for coming, somewhere among the hundreds, and then thousands of people who showed up to answer each other’s questions and hammer out how the site should actually work, the miracle actually occurred.

An incredible number of people jumped at the chance to help a stranger

So far, you’ve provided helpful answers to over five million questions. Those answers are seen by forty-four million people looking for help each month.

To put those numbers in perspective:

  • That’s more people helped each month than visit the New York Times, Bank of America, or Apple.com.
  • If the people helped each month were a US state, it’d be bigger than California and almost twice as big as Texas.
  • If they were a country, it’d be in the top 15% of nations in the world, with more people than Canada, Argentina, or Poland. It’d be practically two Yemens.
  • If you put one frog in a football stadium for each of the 44MM people who get help here each month, that would be forty-four MILLION frogs. Think about that. But don’t say it out loud. People are quick to judge.

Making the Internet a Better Place

The next chapter of Stack Exchange is still being written. A few years ago, we widened our vision beyond programmers. Our new goal was simple, if a bit daunting:

Make the Internet a better place to get expert answers to your questions.

fredrogers shadow

We asked people what other sites they wanted, and carefully started launching them, one at a time. Each time, we were counting on a group of experts to come together and start asking and answering each other’s questions. There have been a few failures along the way, but overall, the successes have been amazing.

We’re now up to 106 sites, including some outstanding ones on System Administration, Computers, MathematicsUbuntu, Video Games, and Cooking, and some young upstarts like our site for English Language Learners. If there’s a site you want to see that doesn’t exist yet, you can still propose it on Area 51.

At the same time, Stack Overflow is continuing to grow, and we are doing our best to keep it healthy. The short history of the internet is littered with communities that started out great, but slowly petered out under the weight of flame wars, mass-n00bocide, funny cat pictures, or just boredom waiting for the next big thing. We still need your help to keep Stack Overflow focused on its core mission: collectively increasing the sum total of good programming knowledge in the world.

Tell Us Your Story

We want to hear your stories. Looking at numbers is one thing, but hearing from real, live people about how someone’s effort here helped them is entirely different. So, if someone’s post here ever saved your day at work, or convinced you to buy your daughter an SLR and learn photography together, take a minute to recognize the person who wrote the answer that mattered to you.

If you’re somebody who mostly answers questions, share how you got involved and what keeps you coming back.  Or tell us about someone who taught you something before we even existed. They deserve to be recognized for the way their investment in you is getting passed on to others here today. If Stack Exchange got you interested in a new topic or taught you a new trick for an old one, we want to hear about it.

Stack Exchange has always been about a community of people helping each other out. It was a long shot when it launched, but you made it work. Now, let’s take a few minutes to recognize everything that we’ve achieved together.

 

Winter Bash 2012 Conclusion: Boxing Day

01-08-13 by Aarthi Devanathan. 15 comments

So. We’ve torn through the advent calendar, tossed aside all the wrapping paper, and (hopefully) obsessively screencapped our gravatars wearing various kinds of silly hats. As of last Friday, Winter Bash 2012 is officially over!

This event was awesome. We had a total of 46,710 users participating across 76 sites, and we gave away 108,924 hats total. The most common hat was the And I Feel Fine hat, which 23,171 users earned for activity on December 21st. The least common hat earned was I Do Say, which was obtained by Bohemian, on Stack Overflow, and kalina, on Arqade for posting an epic 30 up-voted questions. Lots and lots of us were able to find all 7 unlockable secret hats, and a few even found an eighth. Well done!

Sadly, all good things must come to an end. We’ve packed up the hats (and archived the JavaScript) until next time. For now, you’ll be able to see the hats you won (and Jin’s excellent artwork) on http://winterba.sh. If you’re curious to see what hats other people earned, check out the leaderboard.

I really loved seeing how you all got creative in making your gravatars work with the hats — some of which were comically large! Below are a very small number of the hats I enjoyed seeing. There were just too many hats I liked; I have tons and tons of screencaps of users wearing hats in fun, funny, cool, and/or interesting ways.

On some sites, even the Community ♦ user got into the spirit of things:

The best surprise (aside from the little blue circle letting me know I’d gotten another hat!) was seeing users I didn’t expect to enjoy hats sporting all sorts of interesting looks. Since Stack Overflow in particular tends to have a stronger “professional” focus, I tend to forget that folks who are passionate about their work get just as passionate about having fun now and again. Seeing some top users from all over the network equipping headgear, well, it caught me off guard and made me smile.

Several of you also found the “easter egg” on the Winter Bash site — holding down Ctrl and collecting all the falling snowflakes revealed a snowy pink unicorn!

Real Data

One of the things I wanted to look into is how a temporary, high-profile badge can alter behaviors. While some users have mentioned that they stuck around more, was this true at large?

The data are not really clear. Sites with a very high hats-to-users ratio saw serious increases in posts created during this time, visits, and general positive responses from traffic. Straw polls of the moderation teams would seem to indicate that general site upkeep (things like flags, edit queues, and other mod-actions) held stable. Anecdotally, the review queues seemed extra empty, though whether that was because fewer folks were around the sites or because everyone really wanted Le Magritte isn’t clear.

I know I consider this event a real success! It’s been a pleasure seeing everyone get excited, wear silly headgear, and just generally loosen up a bit as the year drew to a close.

Special thanks to Stack Exchange developers Emmett and balpha for building this and keeping it running smoothly, to VP of Engineering David Fullerton for coordination, guidance and encouragement, and to the aforementioned Jin for the beautiful design work.

The Future of Hats

I definitely want to try for some things for the next time:

  • Hats in chat has been requested before. I’d like to push for this for next year.
  • Site-specific hats would be super cool. Some sites unofficially got a hat — Seasoned Advice and Home Improvement — but I’d love to see more sites get their own bespoke hats.
  • More hats! Secret hats seemed to get people the most excited — adding more of those to the batch next year strikes me as a very good idea.

If you have suggestions or feedback about Winter Bash, please feel free to answer this post. I’m going to keep an eye on it, and gather ideas and improvements for next year from your responses.

When we first tried out this idea on Arqade, it wasn’t entirely clear this would be well-received elsewhere. But, based on what I’ve seen these past few weeks, I don’t think we’ve seen the last of Hats on Stack Exchange.