site title

Topic: reference

Respect the community – your own, and others’

03-22-12 by Shog9. 13 comments

In “Why Can’t You Have Just One Site?” Jeff wrote about the rationale for creating three sites instead of one, and the process for determining where a question belongs:

Is it really so hard to figure out which community you belong to, and thus, where your question belongs? Ask yourself this:

  • what is your job title?
  • which community do you consider yourself a part of?
  • what are you trying to accomplish?

You can use the same mountain to go downhill really fast on snow — but it’s plainly evident to the participant which culture they consider themselves a part of, “skiers” or “snowboarders”.

We’ve since grown from a Trilogy to a network of 84 sites. Our audience is large enough to allow a considerable amount of specialization: Apple, Ubuntu, WordPress and Database Administrators all cover topics that previously belonged on Super User, Stack Overflow or Server Fault. But the same philosophy still applies: before you can decide where to ask, you need to know who to ask. And who you ask will depend (at least in part) on who you are…

That’s the philosophy. Putting it into practice creates a few wrinkles: some sites have overlapping communities; some sites are named after their audience, but the name doesn’t quite match up to how the community actually sees themselves; in some cases, the community is defined purely by a topic of interest and not any particular occupation or field. These ambiguities lead to some undesirable behaviors:

  • Cross posting: technically multi-posting, asking the same question verbatim on different sites without tailoring it to that site’s audience.
  • Scope Gerrymandering: attempting to micromanage what’s on-topic in order to avoid overlap with other sites or simply drive away users seen as undesirable.
  • Migration hot potato: kicking a question around from site to site until one of them finally accepts it.

Over time, these conflicts tend to work themselves out: a community may form around a topic or shared interest, but soon develops into something more than that. No one would mistake Ask Ubuntu for Unix and Linux. The types of questions and answers on Programmers or Ask Different will show you at a glance that you’re not on Stack Overflow or Super User. Spending a few minutes looking around before you post – or reading the site’s FAQ – should tell you all you need to know about what questions belong there, and how the community expects them to be asked. There’s no substitute for taking the time to get to know the locals.

With that in mind, here are a few strategies for avoiding these problems as a member of a young Stack Exchange site:

Respecting your own community

As members of a community, your first loyalty should be to that community. When evaluating a question, you shouldn’t be looking to push it off on some other site; instead, ask if it could be appropriate and on-topic for you, the experts who the author decided to ask. Be a bit jealous of your site – don’t blithely turn askers away simply because their question could be asked somewhere else. Don’t hit them over the head with your scope, help them tailor their question to fit into it – and if that means your site’s scope overlaps a bit with another site’s, so be it.

Obviously, there are questions you’ll have to turn away, either because their only connection to your site is via the audience (“How do I make bread as a programmer?”), because it’s completely off-topic (“How do I cook a fish in a dishwasher?” obviously belongs on Cooking, not Home Improvement) or because they’re simply not useful or constructive. But that should be your last resort. Close questions with an eye toward improvement and re-opening, not driving users away.

Respecting other communities

The migration tool was created to help those unfortunate users who asked good questions on the wrong site. Do your best to remember this, whether as a user (flagging or voting to close) or as a moderator (responding to flags).

  • Don’t migrate poorly-asked or non-constructive questions. Just close them. If you want to help the asker out by recommending a site where their question would be on-topic, go ahead – but also recommend they read that site’s FAQ first!
  • Do leave comments on questions that might get better answers somewhere else. The good folks on English Language and Usage might well be able to give the history of some bit of technical jargon, but if you think that question would get a better answer on the site dedicated to the field where that jargon is used – suggest that! If the asker is unhappy with the answers he got, he’ll have a ready source of better ones. Ditto for unanswered questions gathering cobwebs.
  • Along the same lines, don’t attempt to scavenge on-topic questions from other sites by asking the moderators there to migrate them to yours. Again, there’s no harm in leaving a comment suggesting that a question would be a better fit somewhere else. But focus on the questions that aren’t on-topic, or aren’t getting answered – snatching someone’s question (or answer) away without any forewarning is a slap in their face.
  • Finally, be extremely reluctant to migrate old, answered questions. The votes and answers on these reflect the opinions and work of the community where they originated, and in most cases they’ll be somewhat out of place elsewhere – you want your greatest hits to reflect the best that your community has to offer, not someone else’s. And, again, the migration can come across as rude: if someone has invested serious effort into an answer and has linked to it on their blog or from their résumé, then snatching it from them without due consideration won’t endear them to you. Only migrate these questions when the alternative is deletion.

The Stack Exchange software has grown to be extremely powerful, but it’s important to remember that, at their core, these sites run on human beings – and without respect for each other, clever tools solve nothing.

Let’s Play The Guessing Game

02-29-12 by Jeff Atwood. 61 comments

We’ve observed a particular pattern of questions emerging on several Stack Exchange sites.

All these questions are effectively guessing games.

I remember myself playing this a bit childish, but in some ways awesome game, where you control a tank, and can pick up and stack turrets (and maybe something else) from enemy tanks you kill. Maybe they also had different platforms (and if it’s one with wheels then technically it’s not a tank, but hey). It was around 2000 (or maybe even earlier) and the game had 3D graphics.

Trying to remember a book I read in the 80s, reptiles are dominant, have language, have human slaves. Northern human tribes attack the reptile settlements. The reptiles have gourds of partially digested food…they use some type of slug creature to clean hair and fur off mammals.

Please help me finding the single word for representing a person who guides at right time (at the time of need).

I am looking for a children’s book that features a mouse. He lives in a red ticket booth and sleeps in a drawer and rides a motorcycle. It is either a chapter book or a collection of short stories about this mouse.

The question owner tries to describe something they can’t quite remember, in hopes that the greater community will “buzz in” to hazard an answer based on the limited information provided, like on a game show. The best guess gets upvotes, and potentially an accepted answer checkmark. It’s fun, right?

Our engine is great at these kinds of questions, and they tend to do well:

Of course, guessing game questions aren’t a new phenomenon; I alluded to them in the Pee-Wee Herman Rule. But after a year of observing these guessing game questions grow and spread to multiple sites with similar effects, I no longer believe that the slight benefit of these questions outweighs the many negatives.

1. Guessing game questions aren’t practical

Consider Stack Exchange’s first rule of questions not to ask:

You should only ask practical, answerable questions based on actual problems that you face. Chatty, open-ended questions diminish the usefulness of our site and push other questions off the front page.

A half-remembered description of something you vaguely recall is not what I’d call a practical, answerable question.

Unless the asker has demonstrated a practical reason they need to find this, documented that they’ve invested substantial effort in finding it, and given us something concrete that provides us with a reasonable chance of actually guessing the answer — it’s simply Not a Real Question. At best it is a game show trivia contest.

2. Guessing game questions don’t help others

Because these questions are based on vague, broad, half-remembered descriptions, it is unlikely anyone else will be able to find them through a web search. I have a difficult time imagining how you’d construct a web search, either on Google or via Stack Exchange’s built-in search, to find something that you can’t fully articulate. What’s even worse is that these questions, by their very nature, will contain a bunch of broad, speculative “maybe it’s like…” catch-all terms that are likely to trip up future visitors who end up there by accident.

Consider the example of Netstorm: Islands at War, a game so apparently difficult to remember that our gaming site contains no less than three exact duplicate identify-this-game questions about it:

The goal of Stack Exchange is not to construct un-findable single-serving questions that only help one person, but that’s exactly what guessing game questions tend to do.

3. Guessing game questions are unfair

If we allow vague and insubstantial questions, we are explicitly opening the door to “do my work for me” questions (or worst case, Yahoo Answers) — no need to expend effort, do research, provide examples … just explain in vague, broad terms what it is you partially remember and we’ll do the rest of the hard work necessary to figure it out for you? That’s a dangerous precedent to set. It is disproportionate and unfair to the experts on the site.

Also, an expert in the topic should be able to have at least some confidence that the answer he’s writing answers the question. Take that away, and you’re left with questions that don’t know what they want, and answerers throwing guesses at it hoping one will stick. “Is it mentor?” Nope, try again! “Is it Star Fighter XXIV: The Star Fightening!” Sorry, go fish!

4. Guessing game questions aren’t educational

I understand that it’s sometimes fun to guess what someone is thinking of. I also appreciate that it takes a lot of expertise and deep domain knowledge to take a vague, half-remembered description and nail the exact thing. But I would also argue that these questions aren’t educational in any way, because there’s no way to learn about the process of discovery. A particular community member, by virtue of their experience in the field, just happens to be able to take the limited information you remembered and fill in enough of the blanks to guess the correct answer.

I urge you to click on the guessing game tags yourself and take a long, hard look at the artifacts these guessing game questions are producing. After a year I am convinced that guessing game questions do not meet our goal of making the Internet better.

Quite the opposite, in fact.

* and when your site’s most popular tag is “book-recommendation”, there are perhaps deeper problems to contend with.

Stack Exchange’s Greatest Hits

02-24-12 by Jeff Atwood. 11 comments

We have a lot of Q&A sites in the Stack Exchange network now. 84 at the current moment. That’s … a lot of Q&A sites. But most people* don’t find us by browsing the site directory; they find us by encountering a Stack Exchange page in their web search results.

So that may lead you to wonder: what are the most freqently found questions on a given Stack Exchange Q&A site? In other words, the “Greatest Hits” of that particular topic.



(Trivia: did you know that the Eagles’ Greatest Hits doesn’t include their most famous song?)

How do we, as community members, tell which questions are getting the most airplay, are the figurative “Bicycling’s Greatest Hits” or “RPG’s Greatest Hits” of our community? We have a page for this:

stackoverflow.com/questions/greatest-hits
superuser.com/questions/greatest-hits
serverfault.com/questions/greatest-hits
gaming.stackexchange.com/questions/greatest-hits
askubuntu.com/questions/greatest-hits
apple.stackexchange.com/questions/greatest-hits

Yep, just add /questions/greatest-hits to the address bar of any Stack Exchange site.

The [Greatest Hits page] divides the number of page views on a question by the total amount of anonymous question and answer feedback received (adding a bonus for high view counts). We exclude questions with less views than the median view count for the entire site.

For better or worse, these questions are what the world will see and remember your site for, and a big reason why popularity can be surprisingly troublesome.

We haven’t been publicizing the Greatest Hits page much to date because it relies heavily on a feature we only introduced about 6 months ago: anonymous user feedback. If you visited a Stack Exchange question as an anonymous user, there wasn’t much you could do other than answer it. So we added a feedback option under each post.

What we quickly learned is that anonymous users aren’t particularly, uh … talkative. Statistically speaking, they very rarely click these feedback buttons — and when they do, it’s often because the post itself is getting a lot of views. So you need quite a bit of time before you can even begin looking at anonymous user feedback, and it’s frequently only useful on large sites, or the super popular questions.

We now have a reasonable amount of anonymous user feedback after 6+ months. Enough to take action. We ought to be looking at the Greatest Hits for our sites every so often and actively tending to these highly visible questions and answers — because they truly represent how the world sees your site!

I sometimes go through and “touch up” the questions on the Greatest Hits list to make sure they’re as great as they should be. I’d encourage everyone in the community to do the same. Periodically check the Greatest Hits and see if these questions should represent what your site is all about; edit, vote, comment, and flag to ensure that the quality and relevancy of these questions and answers is making your site look as great to the outside world as you know it is.

Remember, if you’re not careful, you could end up like Chuck Berry — a rock legend who will forever be remembered for his only number one hit … “My Ding-A-Ling”.

* this is hardly new news, but for the year of 2011, Google delivered 91% of all incoming traffic to Stack Overflow. It’s not quite as high for Stack Exchange, “only” around 70-80%.

The Trouble With Popularity

01-31-12 by Jeff Atwood. 50 comments

Way back in 2008, we had Alexis Ohanian and Steve Huffman, the founders and co-creators of Reddit, on the Stack Overflow podcast. We chatted about a bunch of stuff, but one of the things they said that always stuck with me was that Reddit always took an explicitly hands-off, no moderation approach to their content from the very beginning.

I found that a bit shocking, since I’ve… never seen that work. Certainly on Stack Overflow and Stack Exchange we are very much pro-moderation — and more so with every passing year. We have literally hundreds of community moderators. We spend a ton of time appointing and electing moderators, as well as conducting weekly moderator chats in the Teacher’s Lounge chatroom, and emailing all our mods a monthly moderator newsletter.

The Reddit founders maintained that evil things which require active moderation didn’t happen too often, provided you build the right kind of community voting and flagging mechanisms. I can agree with that. We’ve found that to be true on Stack Exchange as well. It’s almost enough to make you a believer in the fundamental goodness of human beings.

Almost.

But there’s a deeper, more insidious problem that creeps into systems when the community is unmoderated. Stuff like, say, compilable James Bond Java ASCII art

… or mountain-climbing Skyrim horses and wounded Skyrim NPCs with vivid imaginations.

Let us not forget the classics, either:

… and so, so many more.

These sorts of posts are wildly popular with the community. The cartoon question alone had over a million views by our extremely strict view counter — which easily translates to at least two million views, possibly three million. We don’t hate fun here, but we discovered that these posts become so popular over time that they truly start to drown out everything else on the site.

Ironically, the Reddit community itself now recognizes that moderation is fundamental and essential:

One thing thing that does concern me, however, is that [as this subreddit gets more popular] the amount of image macros, memes, rage comics and generally low-quality content hitting the front page has grown to annoying proportions.

The problem with image macros and rage comics (besides generally lacking wit or anything genuinely insightful) is that they’re quick and easy to digest, and thus tend to get upvoted faster than self posts and actual discussions which take thought and time before an appropriate response can meted out. If you’re not careful you end up with something akin to /r/gaming, which is now a burbling, deformed wreck of its former self, with anything remotely resembling intelligent discussion being buried under a sea of vacuous meme-repetition.

In my view what this subreddit needs is a touch more moderation to ensure that we don’t end up with a front page full of imgur/memegenerator links, and that people who want to use this subreddit as a medium to discuss the [topic] can do so without having to sift through the crap with a shovel.

This is as clear a call for active moderation as I’ve ever seen. And the moderators, to their credit, took charge and instituted changes to help guide their community away from the fatty junk food content:

We’ve heard your concerns over the direction the community is heading. We were hoping we could ride it out and things would balance themselves, but it just isn’t working, and things need to change. It’s plain to see that meme-based content attracts many upvotes, and we all love a good laugh, but it is not what we want this community to be. But this isn’t just about memes, it’s about the general tone of the community. We’re making changes to our rules for posting, commenting, and voting here — necessary changes to make [this] the community we first envisioned.

This community is for sharing thought-provoking stories, high-level tactics discussions, videos/images of the awesomeness of [topic], suggestions or discussions on mechanics, and it can all be done without resorting to memes or complaining. Reddit never ceases to amaze, I expect to be surprised! If you have any questions, message the mods! We hope you agree and understand these changes.

We know that closing the cookie jar is painful. We feel your pain. Nobody likes having their fun taken away. But it’s too addictive and too easy, and in the absence of any moderation, the community would do nothing but add and upvote the easy, fun stuff.

This is why community moderators have real power; they need that power to intervene, educate, and refocus the community’s exuberance on more substantive content. People will fight you almost literally to the death over their right to be entertained, and to entertain others:

Why can’t you just not look at these fun posts? Why do they have to be deleted? You guys suck!

The same reason the moderators and community on that subreddit didn’t decide to “not look” at the fun posts, really:

  1. Broken windows. Every ‘fun’ post users see is an open invitation for them to participate in the fun by adding their own fun question or answer. The stuff spreads like kudzu! Pretty soon the entire site is overrun with nothing but that kind of fun. And even if you grandfather a few in, you’ll enjoy neverending requests asking why their fun question or answer has to be removed, while this one over here is allowed to remain. 
  2. Opportunity cost. Every minute spent participating in an entertaining ‘fun’ post is time that someone could have spent asking or answering a substantive question, something practical that solves an actual problem for hundreds or thousands of people. Entertainment, within reason, is by no means a bad thing — but I experience almost physical pain when I think about a brilliant topic expert spending 10 minutes on one of our sites deciding which hilarious cartoon is their favorite.

Popularity is a tough thing. I’m tempted to call it a curse, but what we try to do at Stack Exchange is make sure that questions and answers are popular for the right reasons — because they are amazing resources for learning from your peers. If you want to slip a few jokes in there with the learning, that’s fine, but when the question devolves into little more than entertainment, I hope you can understand why our community moderators are obliged to step in and protect the community from, well … itself.

Don’t Be Afraid to Use The Science

12-07-11 by Jeff Atwood. 15 comments

I saw an interesting Battlefield 3 question on gaming a few weeks ago.

I’ve recently unlocked the EOD bot, and while playing around with it (and being hopelessly ineffectual with it) I’ve noticed that after I have driven a certain distance away I will return back to first-person view. Running towards the EOD bot will allow me to take control of it again. How far can I drive an EOD bot away from me before I lose control of it?

I play Battlefield 3! Extensively! I’ve used the remote control EOD bot before, but I have no idea what its maximum range is. I’ve never lost control of it. So I could have answered …

When I play as Engineer, I’ve never lost control of the EOD bot. Are you sure you’re not doing something wrong?

… and that is true, insofar as my in-game experience goes, but it’s kind of my opinion, isn’t it? I was curious myself. How would one figure out the actual range of the bot? I decided the only way to definitively answer this question was to:

  1. Start Battlefield 3
  2. Pick the biggest map I knew of
  3. Spawn as an Engineer
  4. Deploy the remote control EOD bot
  5. Drive the bot as far as I possibly could

So I did. Which took a solid 15 minutes of my time at least. After doing this I belatedly realized that I had just run a science experiment.

Stack Exchange just trolled me into doing actual science. For a freaking game. Wow. Consider the implications. Now, if only we could harness those powers for something useful, right? Well, take a look at this Super User question.

When programs are minimized in Windows 7, do they use less memory and CPU than leaving them maximized?

The highest voted answer has an official Microsoft Knowledge Base article backing it up, but it’s quite old. Other users dispute whether it’s correct or not. Anecdotally, I’ve read other blogs confirming the behavior described in that MSKB, but a long time ago. At least that answer has a citation backing it up; many of the other answers on the question are little more than opinions. And you know what they say about opinions. Opinions are like … beautiful flowers, everyone has their own favorite.

Super User is a technical site for computer geeks; we should be able to do better than a bunch of opinions and a smattering of links. A lot better. As a fellow Super User, I decided the best way to tell what’s going on here was to …

  1. Start a common program
  2. Do something typical in it
  3. Check Task Manager or Process Explorer to see how many resources the program is using
  4. Minimize the program
  5. Check Task Manager or Process Explorer to see how many resources the program is using

… so I did. And I edited the highest voted post to include the results of my little science experiment.

We do what we can to help new users understand how to base their answer on something other than an opinion by popping up this little help text when they start composing an answer:

Thanks for contributing an answer to {sitename}!

Please make sure you answer the question; this is a Q&A site, not a discussion forum.

Provide details and share your research. Avoid statements based solely on opinion; only make statements you can back up with an appropriate reference, or personal experiences.

To learn more, see our tips on writing great answers.

While we don’t come out and say it quite this way*, the best answers — not just on Stack Exchange, but to any question in life — should probably involve a little bit of science.

* but maybe we should