site title

Topic: promotion

Apptivate.MS: the results are in!

12-20-12 by Abby T. Miller. 16 comments

After almost three months, Apptivate – the application development contest collaboration between Stack Overflow and Microsoft – has come to an end.

Let’s get to the big news right off the bat. Congratulations to our two Apptivate.MS Grand Prize Winners: Piano Time and Layout!

Congratulations to Piano Time and Layout!

Layout is a powerful tool for interaction design that makes prototyping in the early stages of development and design a breeze. Piano Time is a multitouch piano keyboard for your Surface or other Windows 8 tablet device. (It also supports using your keyboard as, well, a keyboard.) It includes recording and playback, a metronome, a learning mode, and more.

As grand prize winners, these two apps win a $5,000 cash prize! They will also be featured in MSDN Flash and on the DevRadio show, and they will be promoted by Microsoft throughout the developer community.

The grand prize winners came from a pool of 15 finalists and were chosen by a panel made up of Stack Overflow’s own Joel Spolsky and David Fullerton, as well as Microsoft developer evangelists Doris Chen and Jeff Brand. There was some stiff competition for the judges to choose from, and we congratulate all of our finalists. They won’t be going home empty-handed, either – along with the winners of the Reviewer Sweepstakes, they’ll go home with some great prizes, too. The first place winners from each category group win a Surface plus a $500 cash prize. The second and third place winners go home with good stuff, too. Johnny, tell ‘em what they’ve won!

And you get a Surface! And you get a Surface! EVERYONE gets a Surface!

The 15 finalists came from a pool of 50 semi-finalists, which in turn came from the list of over 300 fully eligible submissions to Apptivate. Some more stats about the event:

  • There were 456 apps submitted overall, including deleted and ineligible apps
  • The third week of November was the best week for app submission, with 49 apps coming in that week
  • Apptivate users posted 2646 questions and answers in the [windows-8] and [microsoft-metro] Stack Overflow tags
  • Over the course of the event, 3163 users voted (on apps or on comment threads) 7454 times

That’s all for Apptivate… in 2012! The response to this was so positive, we’re already on the lookout for similar collaborations in the new year… So stay tuned!

Announcing the Apptivate.MS competition semi-finals

12-10-12 by Abby T. Miller. 5 comments

When we announced the Apptivate.MS competition two months ago, we were hoping that a few members of this community would create and submit a few solid Windows 8 apps – forty or fifty, maybe. A hundred if it really went well.

So when we saw all of the high-quality and innovative app submissions that poured in, we were quite frankly blown away. The Stack Overflow community submitted almost 400 appsSee for yourself!

Yet again, the Stack Overflow community has crushed it.

The quality and size of the submission pool made our next job really, really difficult: narrowing them down to just 50 apps for the semi-finals, ten for each of the following category groups: Knowledge, Games, Interest, Work, and Social. A panel of Stack Exchange judges (appointed by Microsoft) ranked all the submissions based on the following rubric:

  • Innovativeness/Creativity (30%)
  • Quality of Submission (30%)
  • Use of Windows 8 features, such as the live tile display (30%)
  • Public Appeal (voting) (10%)

With these criteria in mind, we put together a killer semi-finalist slate. You can vote for your three favorite apps in each category group between now and December 16th (23:59 UTC).

The three highest-voted apps in each category group will win prizes no matter what. They’ll also be eligible for a $5000 cash grand prize, so cast your votes to ensure that the best app wins the day. Not an altruist? Voting in the semi-finals also makes you eligible for the reviewer contest.

The three top-voted semi-finalists in each category group will win great prizes!

You can also continue to leave comments on any app, which also gets you entry into the reviewer contest – as well as providing valuable feedback to Windows 8 developers.

The semi-finals voting phase ends December 16th, 2012, so get your votes in now!

Take the Super User Windows 8 Challenge

10-26-12 by Shog9. 10 comments

Well, Windows 8 is finally available in the wild. Of course, developers have had access to it for quite a while – our ongoing Apptivate contest would be looking pretty sad otherwise. But now you can actually buy the upgrade for your home PC if you’re so inclined, or for your mom’s PC if you haven’t been getting enough tech-support calls from her recently…

In recognition of this, Super User is running its own little promotion:

We’re having a party and you’re invited. Ask and answer questions to complete the challenge levels, and complete different tasks like editing, voting, and blogging to win the eight tile challenges. Each level you beat and each tile you finish enters you for sweet prizes, including the grand prize of a Microsoft Surface RT!

Let’s face it: Windows 8 is a bit… Different. I haven’t upgraded yet – it took Microsoft decades to finally get the taskbar working right, and I’m a bit reluctant to give that up. But if you do decide to take the plunge, Super User is well-prepared to help you through it – or if you’ve already been knee-deep in the change for a while (say, because of that app contest I mentioned above), perhaps you’ve learned something that could help others. Either way, why not double your pleasure by earning a t-shirt, weird-looking mouse or other nifty gear in the process?

Introducing the Windows 8 Challenge on the Super User Blog

Apptivate.ms: A Windows 8 App Development Contest

09-26-12 by Lauren Gundrum. 42 comments

Windows 8 officially launches on October 26th, and it’s already generating quite a few questions on Stack Overflow.  So when Microsoft approached us about sponsoring an app development contest, we thought it was a great idea.

Today we’re announcing Apptivate.ms, a Windows 8 App Development Contest sponsored by Microsoft.

The contest has two parts:

  1. A Developer Contest for people interested in writing applications
  2. A Reviewer Contest for people interested in reviewing and voting on apps

You can participate – and win prizes – in both categories, so even if you aren’t interested in developing your own app you can still participate by helping others by reviewing their submissions.

 

Developer Contest

The Developer Contest awards prizes for the best apps in 5 broad Groups: Knowledge, Games, Interest, Work, and Social.  Here’s how it works:

  1. Create a Windows 8 app and submit it to Apptivate.MS by December 6
  2. The top 10 apps in each Group (chosen by judges, with input from your initial votes) will advance to the semi-final round December 7 – 9
  3. Vote on the best apps between December 10 – 16.  The top 3 voted apps in each category will win the Voter’s Choice Prizes.
  4. One winner will be chosen by the Stack Exchange and Microsoft judges to win the Grand Prize on December 19


Two Grand Prize winners* will be awarded:

$5,000 Cash Grand Prize

+ Feature in MSDN Flash and Microsoft’s DevRadio

+ Promotion in Microsoft’s User Community


The top 3 apps in each category will win a Voter’s Choice Prize:

5 first-place winners: $500 + Tablet running Windows RT

5 second-place winners: Tablet running Windows RT

5 third-place winners: Windows 8

Submit early and often.  Your first submission doesn’t have to be final — in fact, you’re encouraged to submit early and get feedback to develop your app further.  The votes will be reset for the semi-final round so everyone can vote on your final submission.

See the full Rules, Terms & Conditions and the Submission Guidelines on Apptivate.ms for more information.

 

Reviewer Sweepstakes

Not developing an app? You can still help by leaving comments on apps, asking and answering Windows 8-related questions on Stack Overflow, and participating in the Windows 8 Developer Chats.

See the Contest page for a full list of achievements that can be unlocked on Apptivate.ms.  Each achievement (up to 30) gives you an entry into one of the reviewer sweepstakes:

3 Gold-level Winners: Tablet Running Windows RT

10 Silver-level Winners: Windows 8

50 Bronze-level Winners: Limited-edition Apptivate.ms T-shirt

See the full Rules, Terms & Conditions on Apptivate.ms for more information.

 

Getting Started

Thinking about developing an App, but not sure where to get started?  Check out the Resources page for some helpful links and tips.

Prefer to assist others writing apps?  Register your Stack Overflow account on Apptivate.MS now to be eligible for reviewer prizes, and then ask, answer, or share Windows 8 questions on Stack Overflow to get started.

Register on Apptivate.ms now!

 


*NO PURCHASE NECESSARY. A PURCHASE WILL NOT INCREASE YOUR CHANCES OF WINNING. OPEN TO AGES 18 AND OLDER AND WHO DID NOT PURCHASE ANY EQUIPMENT FOR PURPOSES OF ENTERING THE PROMOTION. VOID WHERE PROHIBITED. Enter Contest by: 12/6/12. Enter Sweepstakes by: 12/16/12. For Official Rules, prize descriptions, alternate method of entry, and odds disclosure, visit http://apptivate.ms.  Sponsor: Microsoft Corporation, One Microsoft Way, Redmond, WA 98052, U.S.A.

Can Stack Exchange Capitalize on Hot Trends?

06-04-12 by Sam Brand. 19 comments

Hello. Sam Brand here. For those of you who don’t know me, I’m part of the CHAOS at Stack Exchange. I handle certain “special projects” across the network, oversee syndication, and occasionally poke my head into our communities to make sure our platform works to deliver killer content to the outside world. A couple weeks ago, I embarked upon one of these experiments.

What I did

Each day of the week (May 7 – May 11) I dropped into Google Trends: Hot Searches to find a buzzy keyword about which I could ask a question at one of our sites. I did this mostly out of curiosity; I’d never used the vast majority of our 85 sites. Who are the experts at our biology site? How might some of these communities react to a noob? A small part of this experiment was dogfooding to better acquaint myself with the product and communities that it’s my job to know. But that was just a small part…

The bigger goal was to see how equipped our network is to take advantage of the  most popular, topical keywords on earth. You know, the keywords me, you, your mom and your de-friended friends are most likely to plug into a search field at any given time — keywords like “Dancing with the Stars,” “National Donut Day,” “Barack Obama” and “Facebook” — the most popular search term on earth.

Stack Exchange, of course, was built for the long-tail. We thrive on questions that only a few of you have. But that doesn’t mean our communities can’t generate pieces of widely-appealing, high-quality content, and do so happily. Right? Just because something’s “hot” now doesn’t mean it won’t be useful to a Google Goggler on his hoverboard in the distant future. Or does it?

Here’s what resulted when I asked six “hot” questions across six sites over five days:

  1. Monday, May 7 - “Facebook IPO” - Personal Finance & Money - I am a small retail investor. Can I invest in the Facebook IPO at the IPO price? [Closed]
  2. Tuesday, May 8 - “Where the Wild Things Are” - Skeptics - Does ‘Where the Wild Things Are’ frighten children to a degree that author Maurice Sendak failed to comprehend? [Closed]
  3. Wednesday, May 9 - “Great Pacific Garbage Patch” - Biology - Is the “Great Pacific Garbage Patch” beneficial for marine wildlife?
  4. Wednesday, May 9 - “Barack Obama” & “Same-Sex Marriage” - History - Barack Obama is the first US President to support same-sex marriage. But who was the first head of government in human history to do so?
  5. Thursday, May 10 - “Wolfenstein 3D” - Gaming - Wolfenstein 3D is now available for free online. But is this version any different than the original?
  6. Friday, May 11 - “Flesh-Eating Bacteria” - The Outdoors - What can an injured person in the outdoors do to prevent infection by flesh-eating bacteria?

Click through, or take my word for it when I tell you : Creating high-quality content (based around hot keywords or not) is a challenge.

Asking is a challenge. (Quick! Come up with a clever question about Chagas Disease. Go!) Answering is a challenge. (We are very aware how much work our users put into helping others.) There is no silver bullet when it comes creating smart niche content or newsstand-quality content that your aunt wants to read while she gets a perm in a hair chair.

However…

At some of our sites content creation is more difficult than at others. Skeptics, where I asked my second question, might be the most difficult site to engage on our network. The site is accessible to everyone (Cats!), but the community asks that you become familiar with some strict ground rules before jumping in (Cats AND science!).

I didn’t play by the rules when I asked question #2 (a pointless, overwrought question, I admit) and my question got shuttered. I can live with this. Stack Exchange can live with this. In this case, it’s not a too-strict FAQ or a crabby moderator preventing us from adding to the Internet; It’s me. Hate the player, not game played at Skeptics, a site that consistently churns out Q&A leagues more rigorous than any other user-generated content on the net. It is the site’s strict ground rules that enable it to do so.

However…

Sometimes a site’s rules can get in the way of creating the sort of topical content that would make the net a better place. What happened with Question #1 illustrates this well. A couple Mondays ago, investing in Facebook seemed like a pretty good idea. So, like thousands of others I googled: “How can I invest in Facebook’s IPO?” What resulted were a jumble of links that referred to E-Trade’s involvement in the initial public offering, but no stories that told me directly whether I was eligible to bid on the shares at the IPO price. I just wanted an answer. So I took the query to our Personal Finance site, where the question was quickly closed. The reason for the closure? A similar question had previously been asked at the site, but about Skype’s IPO. Needless to say, Skype is not Facebook, and neither question will ever answer anyone’s question about getting in on any upcoming IPOs. Lacking a canonical answer, this is a case where a site should really learn to love the duplicates.

Q: So, what can we do? How can Stack Exchange improve in cases like these when a good question with a hot proper noun gets shut down?

A: Vote to reopen. Not enough rep? Ask your friends to vote to reopen. Flag for moderator attention. And make your case in the comments. If you want an expert answer, put in a little work to deserve it.

Our moderators, like new users, can use a little poking and prodding. They own the sites as much as you or I. But more than anyone, they can make sites change (Server Fault’s FAQ went through a pretty radical change just this past February).

Conclusion

Lest you think all my hot topic assaults were for naught, think again. Check out our biology site for a comprehensive answer to my question about the “Great Pacific Garbage Patch.” Read here to protect yourself from “flesh-eating bacteria.”  Look here to find out which modern head of state first sanctioned gay marriage. As for Wolfenstein 3D… Several weeks after asking, nobody has yet found any difference between the classic game and the free web-based version. That’s the verdict, for now. Maybe in the future, someone wearing Google Goggles will come along and leave a more definitive answer.