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Podcast #61

07-15-09 by Jeff Atwood. 33 comments

In this episode of the podcast, Joel and Jeff sit down with Miguel de Icaza of the Mono project to discuss Mono, Silverlight / Moonlight, and the pros and cons of open sourcing your code.

  • Miguel is one of the lead developers on the Mono project, which is an ongoing effort to bring the .NET framework to Linux and other non-Microsoft platforms.
  • Miguel characterizes Silverlight (known as Moonlight on Mono) as “the good parts” of WPF. It’s a newer way to build a cross-platform GUI app, an alternative to GTK and Windows Forms.
  • A brief discussion of the implications of cross-platform GUIs, which lack that native flair. Do you have the manpower to maintain three distinct versions of your GUI application — one for Mac, one for Windows, and one for *nixes? Do only programmers notice the subtle differences?
  • Revisiting Fitt’s Law, and applications and operating systems that don’t make good use of it. Certain areas of the screen, mostly the top and bottom and to a lesser extent the sides, are infinitely large, and should be used prominently in the UI to leverage Fitt’s Law.
  • Mono runs on the iPhone, through the Unity game engine! This was challenging for the Mono team to develop, because interpreters and runtimes are explicitly disallowed in terms of the iPhone SDK. Mono had to be converted from a JIT to a static compiler.
  • Per Miguel, programmers wanted Mono because Objective-C is fairly primitive in memory management and requires a lot of repetition and boilerplate. With Mono “this is all taken care for you”, as a higher level language.
  • Due to concerns within the free software community, Microsoft made a legally binding promise that it will not enforce patents against Mono — for the core framework.
  • It turns out that the Microsoft Office 2010 web component, which is free for consumers, is 100% JavaScript + HTML. If Silverlight wasn’t required to pull off Office-in-the-browser by Microsoft itself, is Silverlight really necessary in the bigger scheme of things?
  • Miguel divides the world into PutPixel Programmers and printf programmers. Which type are you?
  • Some big game projects that use Mono for scripting: Second Life, and The Sims 3. Also, a very large social networking site I can’t mention by name was recently ported to Mono.
  • One of my long term 5 year goals is for the Stack Overflow discussion engine to become a go-to choice for public internet discussion, on par with phpBB and its kin.
  • Miguel offers his insight into the controversial discussion of whether open sourcing Stack Overflow would destroy our business model.
  • We actually have contributed one open-source component of Stack Overflow back to the community — the Javascript WMD editor. Also, we provide all of our question and answer content back to the community licensed as cc-wiki.
  • Our Stack Exchange hosted solution will offer free versions for non-profit organizations, and we’re also looking at provided an ad-subsidized version of it as well.
  • Miguel de Icaza is also a Stack Overflow user — with 22 answers and 3,484 reputation. 
  • Check out the Mono Migration Analyzer, which will tell you how easily you can (or can’t) port your .NET project to Mono and run it on other platforms. Please do, because feedback from this tool is used to prioritize future Mono development!
  • Miguel committed to speaking at the Boston Stack Overflow DevDays and presenting some of the same Mono goodness he talked about here.
  • In other Stack Overflow news, the Super User semi-public beta is now open. Come join us!

Our favorite Stack Overflow question this week:

If you’d like to submit a question to be answered in our next episode, record an audio file (90 seconds or less) and mail it to podcast@stackoverflow.com. You can record a question using nothing but a telephone and a web browser. We also have a dedicated phone number you can call to leave audio questions at 646-826-3879.

The transcript wiki for this episode is available for public editing.

Podcast #60

07-01-09 by Jeff Atwood. 51 comments

This is the 60th episode of the StackOverflow podcast where Joel and Jeff discuss the value (or lack thereof) of meta-discussion, how much “big iron” popular websites need, and whether code forking is sometimes inevitable.

  • A discussion of our newly launched outlet for meta-discussion at meta.stackoverflow.com. We view this as a pressure release valve. Why is meta-discussion necessary? What purpose does it serve, and for who?
  • Joel and I are both headphone enthusiasts. It’s also a key part of the programmer’s toolkit for getting “in the zone”, so it’s worth investing in this area.  A quality set of headphones can deliver an audio experience equivalent to floor-standing speakers worth thousands of dollars!
  • After three logo contests, we are becoming experts in crowdsourcing design. There is a risk here when people don’t know what criteria they’re supposed to be judging on. Joel brings up the point of televisions which all have a “store mode” which maximizes brightness and contrast to the actual detriment of the overall image quality. And if you use a LCD at its out of box brightness (always the maximum) you’re going to go blind!
  • We took the plunge and upgraded our database server to its maximum of 48 GB of memory. This is mostly a cheap form of insurance against future growth. We may also end up taking advantage of SQL Server’s database compression. The old memory will be eventually used in a second database server we anticipate needing by the end of the year.
  • I was spurred on to do this after reading about the massive 512 GB monster server that Plenty of Fish bought. It’s interesting how the cost of “free”, at that scale (they’re a top 20 website in the US and Canada), is no longer cheap. Joel points to a scathing New Yorker review by Malcolm Gladwell of Chris Anderson’s book Free, which covers similar topics.
  • As Joel notes, paying $100,000 for a server could be more effective than spending $100,000 for a year’s worth of programmer time to convert your database from single and monolithic (the traditional, classic SQL / Oracle model) to sharded (Hadoop and BigTable).
  • Twitter, for example, has moved to an almost all in-memory database architecture. The downside is that it is literally impossible for me to get to any of my Twitter messages older than the middle of 2008. Still a fan of twitter, though; it’s actually useful. Consider the story of an indie musician who made $19,000 in 10 hours on Twitter, while netting exactly $0 from 30,000 traditional record sales.
  • What are the ethics and legality of using code from one job on a different job? If you get a job as a programmer and you never signed anything, then you own all the code you wrote. Most employers sign a Work for Hire agreement which means they own all the code you write while on the job.
  • Should Stack Overflow be eventually open-sourced? Joel is concerned that open sourcing the code would interfere with the hosted product Stack Exchange that Fog Creek is building out right now. I don’t see a conflict between these two audiences; one has infinite time and no money, and the other wants a turnkey, “it just works” solution for a reasonable price.
  • Joel thinks that hosts deploying open source software crash the business model down to the cost of the hosting itself. I wonder how companies like Six Apart (of Movable Type fame) continue to survive if that is the case. And eventually, won’t someone create an open source clone of what you’re doing anyway? Why not beat them to the punch and take control of the situation, by open sourcing the real thing yourself?
  • I continue to have deep skepticism that the hosted Fog Creek version of Stack Overflow cannot avoid a serious fork with our code. The audience of the ad-supported general internet, versus the audience of paying customers building topic-specific ‘stacks, is very different. Can version control tools save you when you’re building the “same” products for such different audiences?

We answered the following listener questions on this podcast:

  1. Lloyd: “I am leaving a business and working for a competitor in a different business. I want to take the codebase I’ve worked on for the last few years with me — to use as a reference point for future products. What advice can you give?”

If you’d like to submit a question to be answered in our next episode, record an audio file (90 seconds or less) and mail it to podcast@stackoverflow.com. You can record a question using nothing but a telephone and a web browser. We also have a dedicated phone number you can call to leave audio questions at 646-826-3879.

The transcript wiki for this episode is available for public editing.

Podcast #59

06-24-09 by Jeff Atwood. 18 comments

This is the 59th episode of the StackOverflow podcast where Joel and
Jeff sit down with Damien Katz (of CouchDB) to discuss non-conventional databases, non-conventional programming languages, and taking on non-conventional programming projects.

  • Stop, do not pass go, do not collect $200: watch Damien Katz’ outstanding Rubyfringe presentation, CouchDB and Me. It is a hugely inspirational presentation for any working programmer. I can’t recommend it enough. Go watch it now!
  • We have forgiven Damien Katz for working on Lotus Notes. Mostly. To his credit, he did write some very cool code, as documented in his famous formula engine rewrite.
  • You can think of Damien Katz’ CouchDB project as the distilled “good stuff” from Lotus Notes. Wait! Why are you running away? Come back! It’s not that bad! We swear!
  • Damien used Erlang to build CouchDB, largely because it makes error recovery and multiprocessing so much easier. Or as Damien says “what happens when everything goes to s**t”. In other words, networking fails, or you don’t have enough memory to complete the operation. This is stuff that is very tricky in C++, but almost trivial in Erlang.
  • CouchDB took off when the JSON and JavaScript bindings were produced — and were a big hit. This probably says something about trying to popularize your open source project: is it accessible to the average programmer?
  • On Damien’s journey as a software developer: “eventually you get tired of working on stuff for other people.”
  • The negotiations with IBM included the synonyms “douchebags” and “vapid bureaucrats”. They seemed to appreciate his honesty (at least for the set of bad eggs he’s referring to), and Damien is a guy who has spent some time in the bowels of IBM and knows what he is getting into.
  • I liked that Damien, when he reached analysis paralysis in the middle of his project, turned to the soothing, calming midwestern voice of Steve McConnell — and the classic (and my favorite) book Code Complete 2.
  • While building up two new 1U servers for superuser.com, powering on the server with the cover off would trigger the Moro reflex in our 3 month old baby… two rooms over! That’s how loud they are. REALLY loud. I was happy to have UPS take those out of my house. 
  • I didn’t appreciate how much happier I would be with community moderation — I am unburdened from being the judge, jury, and executioner of the occasional serious misbehavior. It’s a group discussion now — thanks to our awesome community moderators, we can reach a concensus together!
  • What does it mean for an open-source project to be version 1? Version 0.1? Version 0.5? When is it good enough to use? Should you look at commit activity; is the project alive? Or should you look at how many people are actually using the software, regardless of version number or commit activity?
  • If you’re a developer, and wondering what specific problem CouchDB could solve for you, Damien says: “would the data you have typically be stored in a document in real life?” The classic example is a contacts database. Do you have a phobia of storing large blobs in a database?
  • I think most hardware-oriented software developers have gone through this thought process at least once: “Hmm. I have gobs and gobs of system memory. Do I really need a swapfile on disk any more?” Don’t try to outsmart the operating system designers, unless you’re an operating system designer. And that goes triple for programmers who think they are language designers!

We answered the following listener questions on this podcast:

  1. Maayan: “What is your stance about using open source software in production code, when the open source project in question is working, but is either below 1.0 or is not actively maintained?”

Our favorite Stack Overflow questions this week are:

If you’d like to submit a question to be answered in our next episode, record an audio file (90 seconds or less) and mail it to podcast@stackoverflow.com. You can record a question using nothing but a telephone and a web browser. We also have a dedicated phone number you can call to leave audio questions at 646-826-3879.

The transcript wiki for this episode is available for public editing.

 

Podcast #58

06-17-09 by Jeff Atwood. 64 comments

This is the 58th episode of the StackOverflow podcast where Joel and Jeff discuss HTML encoding, designing “safe by default”, whether a question can be too simple, and the art of beta testing.

  • Joel wonders if doing his Visual Studio development in a virtual machine is a viable solution. I say in this era of cheap 8 GB RAM and quad core CPUs, why not?
  • As always, Naming Is Hard. We’re struggling with naming the hosted Stack Overflow that Fog Creek is working on. Joel likes the name “Stack Exchange”. It’s not bad, but we wonder if anyone listening has a better idea?
  • I admit, finally, that Joel was right about something. Don’t HTML encode data that’s stored in your database! Take the good advice of Damien Guard and Joel Spolsky! You can choose to store both representations, but don’t store just the HTML; go with the raw data at the highest level of precision.
  • A brief political rant about the evil of view engines that fail to HTML encode by default. The problem with this design choice is that it is not “safe by default”, which is always the wrong choice for a framework or API. Forget to encode some bit of user-entered data in one single stinking place in your web app, and you will be totally owned with XSS. Believe it. I know because it’s happened to us. Multiple times!
  • Joel maintains that, with a strongly-typed language and the right framework, it’s possible (in theory) to completely eliminate XSS — this would require using a specific data type, a type that is your only way to send data to the browser. That data type would be validated at compile time.
  • We continue to ramp up on our computer enthusiast site, superuser.com — we just launched a logo design contest at crowdspring. This will be as close as we ever get to an “anything goes” website, and I’m excited to see what happens.
  • I maintain your online behavior shouldn’t be all that different than your general public behavior. I say “don’t post anything you wouldn’t want your mom to read.” Joel cites the Wall Street rule: “don’t ever write anything you wouldn’t want published on the front page of the Wall Street Journal.” Also, systems where people are able to behave as if nobody is watching are fundamentally broken systems.
  • Joel says that the only bad simple question is a duplicate simple question. I say simple questions are OK as long as they’re actually interesting (in some way) for other users to consider and answer. To prove his point, Joel actually asks the question on Stack Overflow: How do I move the turtle in LOGO? Do you think this question adds value?
  • Some ruminations about the challenge of asking questions when you are a total beginner and not even sure what you should be asking. Perhaps the best solution there is “screenshots”, or in code parlance: just shut up and show us the code!
  • Beta testing is an art, and perhaps the first beta test barrier is if people can actually understand whatever the heck it is you’re trying to do. There’s often a disconnect between what beta users say (particularly gung-ho early adopters who love betas) and what typical users do. Unfortunately at the early beta, you lack the one thing you’d benefit from most: lots of usage data!
  • The absurdity of the term “Content Management System”. It’s for, y’know, managing.. content. What does this even mean? Trying to be everything to everyone means you solve nobody’s problem particularly well. Maybe this is why Fog Creek’s hosted FogBugz is not attempting to expand thematically beyond their core business: software bug tracking.
  • Remember that random NTP server that Joel ran into? They’re back — and they made a slightly .. uh.. disturbing .. theme song for us! Thanks! We think!

We answered the following listener questions on this podcast:

  1. Joseph: “Now that you have the jobs connection up and running, how do you think that will affect the questions and answers on the site — that some future employer might see what they’re doing?”
  2. Frank: “What are your thoughts on getting beta testers (and getting good beta results) when you don’t necessarily have a super high profile project?”

Our favorite Stack Overflow questions this week are:

If you’d like to submit a question to be answered in our next episode, record an audio file (90 seconds or less) and mail it to podcast@stackoverflow.com. You can record a question
using nothing but a telephone and a web browser. We also have a dedicated phone number you can call to leave audio questions at 646-826-3879.

The transcript wiki for this episode is available for public editing.

 

Podcast #57

06-10-09 by Jeff Atwood. 53 comments

This is the 57th episode of the StackOverflow podcast where Joel and Jeff discuss the relationship between speed and skill, iPhone development, and the value of programming fundamentals.

    • Joel comments on the surprising correlation between how fast you can solve a simple problem, and your overall skill level as a programmer. This is why giving even a very experienced programmer a simple problem can still work. If you can’t truly master the fundamentals, it’s hard to work at higher levels of abstraction.
    • We agree with Paul Graham: in general, there tends to be a correlation between the length of a response and its quality. We’ve also observed this pattern on Stack Overflow. It isn’t always true (TL;DR), but it’s a verifiable pattern. Either be the first and quickest, or be the best and most comprehensive!
    • Due to high demand, five new cities were added to the Stack Overflow DevDays: Boston, Austin, Los Angeles, Cambridge (UK), and Amsterdam.
    • I was quite impressed with the striking design Mike Kus put together for the Stack Overflow DevDays website. He breaks it down step by step for us. Like most programmers, I’m a terrible designer, but at least I know what’s good enough to steal!
    • As promised, we released a creative commons data dump of all the Stack Overflow data including all questions and answers. We’re excited to see what the community can do with this data; Brent Ozar put together a data mining video to get people started.
    • Stack Overflow has become a very popular destination for iPhone development. This is completely accidental, but it is a valid reflection of the vibrant and growing iPhone development community. If you’re an iPhone developer, check out the Mobile Orchard website and podcast, which even has a best of Stack Overflow for iPhone developers!
    • Joel and I are tremendously impressed with Apple’s development push for the iPhone, including the App Store. It is remarkably Microsoft-like, in a good way — it’s completely driven by developers, developers, developers! “If you want to be a mobile developer, your #1 choice has to be Apple.”
    • Some comments on the sad state of Windows Mobile (rumored Silverlight reboot), Google Wave (go HTML 5!) and the Palm Pre (is HTML/JavaScript/CSS a viable development platform)?
    • One downside of discussing questions on the podcast is that it leads to the Hawthorne effect, and sometimes radically changes the state of the question.
    • Joel recommends SICP, The C Programming Language, The Unix Programming Environment, and Introduction to Algorithms as solid books for programmers who want to brush up on their fundamentals and potentially do well at programming interviews.
    • We recommend checking out Jason Calacanis’ podcast, This Week in Startups.

    We answered the following listener questions on this podcast:

    1. Josh Hunt: “The first answer to my question, the answer that got the higest number of votes, was not correct — has Stack Overflow failed in the ‘first answer is best’ aspect?” and “We’ve been taught algorithms in our high school using pseudocode. What do you think of this?”
    2. “If I’ve applied for a job at Fog Creek (or anywhere else) and didn’t quite make it, what can I do to improve myself as a programmer and have a better chance next time?”

    Our favorite Stack Overflow questions this week are:

    • Bubble Sort Homework. Homework questions are frowned upon on Stack Overflow, but there is a right way to ask them — and a way to get the community to help you while helping each other.

    If you’d like to submit a question to be answered in our next episode, record an audio file (90 seconds or less) and mail it to podcast@stackoverflow.com. You can record a question using nothing but a telephone and a web browser. We also have a dedicated phone number you can call to leave audio questions at 646-826-3879.

    The transcript wiki for this episode is available for public editing.