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Podcast #52

05-06-09 by Jeff Atwood. 31 comments

This is the 52nd episode of the StackOverflow podcast — our one year anniversary — where Joel and Jeff discuss the launch of Server Fault, how you determine if your code is smelly (or just aromatic), how programmers learn by doing, and how good ideas are often too crazy to copy until it’s too late.

  • We’ve been podcasting for one full year now. Hopefully we’ve gotten better at this podcast stuff and not worse, but the jury is still out.
  • Server Fault, the first sister site to Stack Overflow, is now in private beta. Server Fault is for system administrators and IT professionals. If that’s you, come join us!
  • We’ve only done one major branch in Stack Overflow to date, and it was excruciatingly painful in Subversion, even after updating to 1.6 which has “better” support for merging. We’re considering switching to Mercurial to make future merges feel a bit less like gnawing our own limbs off.
  • Joel announces that Fog Creek is working on a hosted version of Stack Overflow, and they are looking to hire a software engineer to work on the project. If it works out, you get the whole Fog Creek relocation package! If you’ve ever wanted to work on the Stack Overflow codebase (and you’re looking for a full time gig) this is your chance!
  • The prospect of an outside developer looking at our Stack Overflow code base makes us nervous. Maybe this is a healthy reaction — is any code ever good enough? Probably not.
  • We do believe in continuous refactoring, and part of that is developing free from fear. Don’t be afraid to break stuff! Have some unit tests, and when things do break, be able to fix it very rapidly.
  • Test Driven Development is possibly the worst and most incorrect name ever applied to a concept in software engineering, ever. And that’s saying a lot. TDD is more about design than testing, but when every TDD tutorial starts with “ok, we write a test to verify..” it’s sort of hard to justify. Perhaps Behavior Driven Development would be a better name.
  • TDD, as far as testing is concerned may be a bit too programmatic. Never underestimate the power of a skilled human tester.
  • We learned ASP.NET MVC as we went. This is a surprisingly common pattern; Joel can’t ever remember a time when he wasn’t building a new application in a new framework. Programming is, almost by definition, continuously learning: your entire career will be one long, unbroken string of learning one new bit of technology after another. Programming is shorthand for learning how to learn.
  • Joel asks: as a professional programmer, how often do you start a new major project that’s going to have a long life expectancy? It’s startlingly rare. Even at Fog Creek they’ve had maybe four in the entire time the company has existed. So when you start a new project, you almost have to bet on the new framework that you think will be vibrant and alive five years from now — that means you’ll be learning as you go, again! There is a double whammy of learning the framework and a language at the same time though — that’s extra-risky.
  • A brief discussion of why unconfirmed “no-touch” user actions are so dangerous on the web; they are a XSRF playground! If the user holds a cookie to your site, and an attacker can get them to click on a GET or POST, they have just forced the user to take that action. We added an interstitial confirmation to a few actions to prevent this; the particular case that was extremely dangerous was associating a new OpenID provider in one click. If that OpenID provider was rogue and controlled by the attacker, they now own the account.
  • Joel notes that if you’re shy about putting things online, you are letting other people control your online identity — and that will hurt you much more in the long run than any potentially questionable things you might possibly put online.
  • One of the goals of creating Stack Overflow was as a vehicle to build your online identity as a professional programmer, a virtual set of bread crumbs showing that you indeed know your stuff, and your programming peers recognize you for your knowledge.
  • Joel gave a speech about Stack Overflow at Google recently. What question did Guido van Rossum, the creator of Python, ask?
  • A brief mention of stackoverflowoverflow … overflow.
  • By the time anyone tries to copy an iPod, Apple is already a generation ahead. Continual innovation and evolution is always the best approach to defeat those who would blindly copy what you’re doing, and that goes double for software which is infinitely malleable. If your software isn’t continually evolving, it is effectively dead!
  • Good ideas sound too crazy for anyone to even consider copying them. The type of people who copy are not interested in anything that remotely resembles risk; they are only going to copy proven successes. So if you’re starting out with a new crazy idea (and you should be!), this is unlikely to be a practical concern.
  • Joel’s computer has apparently been taken over by a mexican wrestler named Gordo. I have no idea.

We answered the following listener questions on this podcast:

  1. Paul: “I’ve seen some companies do background checks online with MySpace, Facebook, Twitter, etcetera. Should developers be concerned about old, embarrassing code being posted online?”
  2. Tom: “As a startup entrepreneur, what steps should you take, if any, to protect your intellectual property?”

Our favorite Stack Overflow qustions this week are:

None! Every single Server Fault question I’ve asked is my favorite this week! I’ve had all these sysadmin and IT pro questions welling up inside me for months, and it was so intensely satisfying to finally be able to ask them and get really great answers. Please join us in the beta!

If you’d like to submit a question to be answered in our next episode, record an audio file (90 seconds or less) and mail it to podcast@stackoverflow.com. You can record a question using nothing but a telephone and a web browser. We also have a dedicated phone number you can call to leave audio questions at 646-826-3879.

The transcript wiki for this episode is available for public editing.

Podcast #51

04-29-09 by Jeff Atwood. 30 comments

This is the 51st episode of the Stack Overflow podcast, where Joel and Jeff sit down with Joel’s business partner, Michael Pryor of Fog Creek Software, at Stack Overflow world HQ (i.e., Jeff’s house) in El Cerrito, California.

  • At my home, Joel discovers my secret clock fetish. I have a pong clock, a nixie clock, and I’d love to have an oscilloscope clock!
  • Joel and Michael went to the Computer History Museum, one of my favorite places in the world. It’s not just big iron; Michael geeked out over his old Apple //gs, and Joel enjoyed revisiting old HP calculators.
  • Stack Overflow comments are now elevated to the main page. We’ve gone through several user feedback cycles on this, and we feel the current comment layout is a good balance. The preference for this is still in the works. This was partially inspired by the way comments are displayed on SFGate articles (scroll to the bottom to see how comments are displayed there).
  • A discussion of the value of meta — discussing Stack Overflow on Stack Overflow. How much meta is acceptable? Where should meta-discussion go? Isn’t the podcast and the blog meta enough? Is there a need for stackoverflowoverflow?
  • One problem is that the system we’ve built is good at focused, directed Q&A but quite bad at arbitrary discussion. It’s why Joel objected to me proposing the use of the Stack Overflow engine for the Joel on Software discussion boards and the Business of Software discussion boards. Not a good fit!
  • Consider an analogy with school — if you don’t like the after school activities students are engaging in, it’s because you didn’t provide a good set of alternatives for them. But perhaps a better analogy is that of students who become teachers; they need a “teacher’s lounge” area.
  • The whole point of Stack Overflow is synthesizing better answers than what you can commonly find on the open internet. If the answer is already good and easily findable elsewhere on the internet, leave it there! Don’t repost the answer on Stack Overflow unless you’re enhancing and improving the answer in some small way.
  • How is Babby Formed has been removed from Yahoo Answers, and we have removed Programming at Sea.
  • Part of the philosophy of doing lower-level things yourself, such as building your own computers (or even learning C), is to do it enough to understand it — and learn something along the way. It doesn’t mean that you need to (or even should!) do those things forever, but the journey of learning and discovery is its own reward. The best reference for programmers who want to learn what goes on underneath their code is Charles Petzold’s outstanding book, Code.
  • Learning black hat techniques is important, because when good is dumb, evil will always triumph. Don’t be dumb. Know what’s out there, and how to exploit it. The morality of studying black hat techniques derives from what you do with that information. Will you sell it? Distribute it and actively attack ? Or quietly disclose it to the vulnerable software or website?
  • Joel marvels at the enormous size of the Microsoft campus since he worked there; when he was at Microsoft in the early 90′s, there were around 5,000 employees and it was not uncommon to see Bill Gates walking around the campus. The Redmond visitor center is a disappointment; it should be more like the Computer History Museum, highlighting Microsoft’s central role in so much of that history to date.
  • Apparently the best estimates are that there are around 9 million programmers in the world, roughly the population of New York City. Imagine a whole city of nothing but programmers. On second thought, that’s too scary — let’s not.
  • A small clarification on last week’s Steve Yegge project; Steve is not the author of the Google JavaScript compiler, but a client of it.

We answered the following listener questions on this podcast:

  1. Peter: “What do you think about the practice of finding an answer, and re-posting it on Stack Overflow?”
  2. Juma: “Should software engineers learn how the underlying hardware works?”

Our favorite Stack Overflow questions this week are:

If you’d like to submit a question to be answered in our next episode, record an audio file (90 seconds or less) and mail it to podcast@stackoverflow.com. You can record a question using nothing but a telephone and a web browser. We also have a dedicated phone number you can call to leave audio questions at 646-826-3879.

The transcript wiki for this episode is available for public editing.

Podcast #50

04-22-09 by Jeff Atwood. 43 comments

This is the 50th episode of the StackOverflow podcast, where Joel and Jeff sit down with Steve Yegge of Google and the most excellent Stevey’s Blog Rants.

  • This episode was recorded on site at the Kirkland, Washington Google office, where Joel gave a talk earlier in the day.
  • A brief discussion about the APL language, whose keywords are symbols. Imagine how challenging it would be to program in a language where you need a special keyboard. There’s a more popular (not sure “popular” is the right word) version of APL named J which drops the symbols in favor of plain ASCII.
  • How big a fan of working at Google is Steve? He worries that new hires from college will expect the rest of their working life to be as good as their Google experience.
  • Steve can finally talk about what he was working on, which he was so vague about on our previous podcast with him. Mostly, he was disturbed at the state of JavaScript tooling at Google — “dude, you spelled it fuction again.”
  • The state of the art in tools means painstakingly adding support for each individual language into each individual editor. What if there was a way to plug first-class language intellisense / compilation functionality into any editor — in a generalized way? That’s the problem Steve set out to solve.
  • Take compilers that are defined for IDEs — Eclipse has three Java compilers built into it — a fast inaccurate one as you type, a better batch one, and then a great big one that does exhaustive analysis on large trees (Steve says Eclipse has “a better Java compiler than the Java compiler”.) This is all necessary to get good editor support! Why not take these compilers and run them on the google infrastructure, so they are commoditized and available to any editor?
  • Steve says the way tools and languages integrate today is utterly backwards. Languages should support the tools, rather than the other way around. “We should have been doing this for 20 years!”
  • Prototype doesn’t play well with the JavaScript compiler at Google, partly because nobody has actually tried to compile the code before! It exposes some problems that weren’t immediately obvious. All the common JavaScript frameworks require some tweaking for the JavaScript compilation process.
  • Steve likens the comparison between compilation and dynamic typing to taking a shower and brusing your teeth. You should do both! The only reason we can’t do both of these things is because, as Steve points out, our tooling currently sucks.
  • JavaScript has a more interesting origin than I realized — it was originally based on Scheme.
  • Per Steve, Scala is like Haskell but with more concessions to real world programming. He points out that the great thing about Java is the fantastic tooling, which means it’s ultimately a better programming experience than a theoretically “superior” programming language.
  • Joel doesn’t hate Unix; FogBugz supports Unix (although that support tends to be complex and costly) and Joel regularly runs cygwin on his laptop. That said, modern Unixes have their faults too. Steve observes that the only way to determine what packages are installed on Ubuntu is to diff the dpackage output against a clean machine. Also, Firefox is very slow on Linux relative to Mac and Windows.
  • Stack Overflow is for programming related questions, but defining programming related isn’t easy. There will always be a gray area, which is further complicated by the fact that we do want the occasional fun questions — we just don’t want the system overrun with the stuff.
  • Steve points out that even Amazon has examples of “fun” product reviews that wouldn’t normally be permitted, such as On Amazon, All of a Sudden Everyone’s a Milk Critic and The Story About Ping.

We answered the following listener questions on this podcast:

  1. “What is Joel’s history with Unix? He mentions Unix a lot in vaguely pejorative ways. Did he have a bad early Unix experience?” No, Steve, the caller did not say “eunuchs”!

Our favorite Stack Overflow question this week is:

If you’d like to submit a question to be answered in our next episode, record an audio file (90 seconds or less) and mail it to podcast@stackoverflow.com. You can record a question using nothing but a telephone and a web browser. We also have a dedicated phone number you can call to leave audio questions at 646-826-3879.

The transcript wiki for this episode is available for public editing.

 

Podcast #49

04-15-09 by Jeff Atwood. 43 comments

This is the 49th episode of the StackOverflow podcast, where Joel and Jeff sit down with Alex Papadimoulis of The Daily WTF to discuss the distinction between IT/sysadmins and programmers, online justice for webforums, user-friendly IDs for databases, and the future of software distribution.

  • Some of our favorite Daily WTF entries: Spaced Out and Have You Tried JavaScript? Alex likens their writing process to the Vital Signs column in Discover Magazine.
  • As we build up serverfault.com , the already grey area of “which question goes where?” becomes even .. greyer. The animal, vegetable, mineral problem is not going away any time soon. That said, if you can attach code to your question, it probably belongs on stackoverflow.com. And if your question involves a server (and no code), it probably belongs on serverfault.com. But there are always exceptions, like this question about working conditions.
  • I was surprised to find that there seems to be no critical mass of sysadmin/it bloggers online, certainly no equivalent to the legions of high profile programming bloggers. Thus, we’ll be initially seeding serverfault.com with those programmers from stackoverflow.com who cross over and also wear the sysadmin/it hat in their work.
  • What if there was a programming language that used only abstract symbols instead of existing words in a human language? There is! But it’s only a research project. (And I found out that Joel wasn’t kidding about APL!)
  • Some clarifications about the localization discussion last week. Joel and I continue to disagree about priorities here, is what it boils down to.
  • Joel and Michael are fans of the hellban concept, but I find it to be a bit much like the guys in black masks making people disappear overnight. We implemented a penalty box instead. The hellban might be appropriate for random spammers, but for engaged members of a community, it’s a terrible system of justice. We also improved our flagging system ala Craigslist so it’s easier to communicate with moderators.
  • The specific source of friction was editing. It turns out that the spirit of an edit is as important as the technical rationale for it. We love and encourage editing, of course, but it’s possible to follow the absolute letter of the law and still be toxic to the community. Joel says that the typical programming mindset makes us particularly prone to this behavior.
  • You have to be able to let things go. One of the curiosities of Wikipedia is that the most obsessed users always win. You can’t compete with someone who devotes hours every day to maintaining their pet topic, with scripts to protect it. This system, on some level, must work because if it didn’t Wikipedia would be permanently broken.
  • In addition to software increasingly running in the browser via various mechanisms, we view services like Valve’s Steam as the future of software distribution. Ultimately it should be as easy and painless to install software as it is on the closed-ecosystem iPhone and its App Store. The tension between digital distribution and traditional retail channels is still a major hurdle, however.

Alex liked this Stack Overflow question:

  • Database-wide unique-yet-simple identifiers in SQL Server. Great question having to do with the human readability of IDs for unique database records. Lots of food for thought. Alex recommends unique lengths per record type, or the “Smart Key” approach of encoding dates and other unique things in the id.

We answered the following listener questions on this podcast:

  1. Andy Brice: “What will happen with the market with downloadable software? Everything in the browser? Hybrid between the downloadable executables and stuff running in the browser? Or will it be business as usual?”

If you’d like to submit a question to be answered in our next episode, record an audio file (90 seconds or less) and mail it to podcast@stackoverflow.com. You can record a question using nothing but a telephone and a web browser. We also have a dedicated phone number you can call to leave audio questions at 646-826-3879.

Reminder: next week, we’ll have Steve Yegge as a guest. The previous episode with Steve was hugely popular, so hopefully this will be another winner!

The transcript wiki for this episode is available for public editing.

 

Podcast #48

04-08-09 by Jeff Atwood. 119 comments

This is the 48th episode of the StackOverflow podcast, where Joel and Jeff discuss planning your career, the importance (or not?) of localization, what makes a good moderator, and dealing with programmers who lack interpersonal skills.

  • Until 2004, I felt sort of like that feather in the movie Forrest Gump, or the plastic bag in American Beauty. I had no real plan for my career. This prompted me to think about what I wanted from my career, and it’s why I wrote The Eight Levels of Programmers. Think about who you respect, and why, and whether those paths work for you.
  • If you’re very lucky in your career, perhaps you’ll be able to build Bongo’s Dream House.
  • Joel and I have a long (REALLY LONG) discussion about the Chinese Stack Overflow clone, cnprog. It’s excellent that we are inspiring other programmers, but we do draw the line at copying our look and feel down to the tiniest detail (including the blog). Don’t be a content stealing jerk!
  • One reason localization has been a very low priority is that we feel for our particular audience, namely programmers, English is the de facto standard language. Not that other languages aren’t important, but it’s easier to get engineering work done when everything coalesces around a standard language.
  • It is true that localization is not even close to being on our radar. Programming communities need to form in local languages, too. 
  • We’re open to providing a dump of our cc-wiki licensed content, but we don’t want to have an AOL data scandal. That would be .. bad. It’s the biggest risk blocking that from happening at the moment.
  • Joel believes that there are five “important” languages that programming content should eventually be localized into: German, Spanish, French, Chinese, and Japanese.
  • We’re beginning the process of promoting a notable user from our community to full-blown moderator status. Shaya Loney, who works at answers.com, had some excellent advice for us — one of the risks is that when you take one of your best teachers and turn them into the principal of the school, you lose a great teacher. We also want moderators with a variety of different backgrounds for diversity.
  • We were able to test our datacenter disaster contingency planning a little with a recent server error. Lesson: always have your contingency plans ready to go in practice, not just in theory. We only lost time, but we’re considering the use of remote KVMs if this becomes an ongoing concern.
  • One way to deal with programmers who come off as abrasive and perhaps lack interpersonal skills, is to focus on the specific behaviors that are problematic. Detail the very specific, ultra-narrow things that they could change to improve the way other people react to them.
  • There’s a good reason to fix this, beyond the bad apple theory. As Joel points out, “for marginal performers, the people who don’t get along, are probably going to get fired, and the people who everybody likes, are probably going to stay around.”
  • Revisiting the “architect” title. We still think it’s a bad idea, but perhaps it’s more palatable if you think of it as “software engineer with lots of experience.” And get rid of the title! That said, there are the rare few, with Joel’s example of Dave Cutler, who truly was the Architect of Windows NT in every possible sense of the word.

We answered the following listener questions on this podcast:

  1. Demitrios from Brazil “What do you do with a solid contributor who on a personal level is very annoying, nobody likes him, and nobody can get along with him?”
  2. Rudy from Denver “Is it possible that Architect is a valid title, for those developers who have the skill to develop large applications?”

If you’d like to submit a question to be answered in our next episode, record an audio file (90 seconds or less) and mail it to podcast@stackoverflow.com. You can record a question using nothing but a telephone and a web browser. We also have a dedicated phone number you can call to leave audio questions at 646-826-3879.

The transcript wiki for this episode is available for public editing.