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Podcast #56

06-03-09 by Jeff Atwood. 32 comments

This is the 56th episode of the StackOverflow podcast where Joel and Jeff sit down with Jason Calacanis to discuss the business side of software, including Mahalo’s “Skee-Ball” economy, when VC funding is appropriate, and whether SEO matters.

  • Jason Calacanis regales us with his tales of being a BBS script kiddie on his IBM PC Jr. He later got fired from his job in the Fordham computer lab for setting up a warez partition on one of the computers in the lab. Oh, and he installed a keylogger on his boss’s computer, and sold pirated software on floppies, too. :)
  • Jason was one of the earliest internet reporters on the east coast with Silicon Alley Reporter.
  • Apparently the Q&A format — dubbed “Knowledge Exchange” — was pioneered in Korea with Naver and Daum, which Yahoo Answers copied for the US. In Korea, the primary way to get information is through users exchanging knowledge, not search algorithms.
  • Rather than translate the app, Facebook apparently let users volunteer to translate different parts of the Facebook UI itself. Jason’s Mahalo is not localized.
  • In Korea, the main knowledge exchange sites are all noindexed, so Google is a non-starter there. If all the newspapers in the US noindexed as a consortium, Google would be screwed. 
  • Jason is a big fan of the badge system on Stack Overflow, which he plans to add to Mahalo. This of course is modelled on the Xbox 360 Achievements system; every badge in the system is there to encourage community building (and not inadvertently community destroying) behavior. It’s a surprisingly fine line.
  • Joel’s big objection to Mahalo is that, like the now-defunct Google Answers, it turns an intrinsic motivation for asking and answering questions into an extrinsic motivation (hey, I can get paid real money for this!)
  • Jason maintains that money is not the primary motivator on Mahalo. He calls it a “Skee-Ball Economy”, where you are playing skee-ball for fun, and getting lots of tickets to cash out and buy fun things. It’s a “token economy”. You can’t make a lot of money, but it (theoretically) adds a secondary driver to an already fun activity.
  • Jason equates the Stack Overflow community with an “expert economy”, akin to the open source software ecosystem. Jason mentioned that he has used nginx and hadoop mailing lists to identify people to hire and/or bring in to teach the other developers at Mahalo. My question is, why shouldn’t Mahalo also be an expert economy?
  • Jason says “I’m not so much into creating the financial system to get something out of people, it’s more that I like to take work that was previously undercompensated or not compensated and make it into a career. I’m very proud of the fact that we [WebLogs, Inc.] were the company that made blogging into a career.” 
  • Jason famously offered the top 25 users of Digg $1,000 a month to become community managers at Netscape. And 23 of the 25 users took that offer. Joel says this is like paying for sex — applying money at the one point where most people do not have a problem getting people to contribute to a community. Jason: “I may have made a mistake”, but traffic increased, and he maintains there was already a shadow economy around paid submissions to Digg.
  • Jason, who has a reporting background, ultimately wanted to add a layer of journalism and editorial control to the stories submitted to Digg. Even on “anything goes” vote driven sites like Digg, they do have one level of editorial control, in that stories can be “in dispute.”
  • Joel asks Jason — with your background in VC and funding, what would you do with Stack Overflow? Would you raise money? How, why, and for what? (Which reminds me: what’s the difference between VC funding and a flaming bag of poop left on your doorstep? Trick question! There is no difference!)
  • We now offer an integrated job board — if you’re looking for gigs, or looking for a great programmer or sysadmin, check out jobs.stackoverflow.com and jobs.serverfault.com.
  • A brief discussion of advertising strategies and philosophies. I’m very skeptical of self-serve advertising after my experience with Google AdSense, which performs abysmally badly on Stack Overflow.
  • Are community-driven sites like Mahalo and Stack Overflow turning users into digital sharecroppers? Is it an economic system where people are working for praise? Does splitting the revenue with the user, ala Knol and Google Answers, really work? The track record for this approach is not good. And if you optimize for things that are popular, no matter what they are, then you end up with a site where every question is the programming cartoon question. I call this “Mahalo”.
  • In the next 6-8 weeks, we’ll be launching the third site in the Stack Overflow trilogysuperuser.com. This is a site for power users and computer enthusiasts.
  • Is writing software “hard”? That depends on your tolerance for frustration and what you happen to be building.
  • Jason, as a serial entrepreneur, points out that there is no downside or risk to starting a company and failing in the United States. If you have great ideas, don’t just let them marinate in your brain forever — get out there and start building them!
  • One of my favorite Calacanis posts is Why people hate SEO … and why SMO is bullcrap. 90% of SEO is simple rules for building clean HTML. The other 10% is that SEOs are really just life coaches who need to transform their clients into something awesome that people actually care about. What you really need to optimize for is being awesome. And that’s a bit harder than pulling some SEO out of your magic bag of tricks.

We answered the following listener questions on this podcast:

  1. Brian McKay: “I recently read the book Dreaming in Code. One of the concepts in the book is that software development is a very difficult profession — that software and surgery are two of the most difficult things that a person can attempt. Do you agree with this?”

If you’d like to submit a question to be answered in our next episode, record an audio file (90 seconds or less) and mail it to [email protected]. You can record a question using nothing but a telephone and a web browser. We also have a dedicated phone number you can call to leave audio questions at 646-826-3879.

The transcript wiki for this episode is available for public editing.

 

Podcast #55

05-28-09 by Jeff Atwood. 28 comments

This is the 55th episode of the StackOverflow podcast where Joel and Jeff discuss killer IDEs, how much interview feedback is appropriate (for both parties), and how to teach young programmers who think they know it all.

  • Server Fault has launched! If you’re a sysadmin or IT pro type, please join us there.
  • You may have noticed that woot! is the launch sponsor of Server Fault. These sorts of (hopefully) tasteful advertiser relationships underwrite continued development of the site — and let us do cool things like bring on Geoff Dalgas as Stack Overflow Valued Associate #00003!
  • What does it mean to be successful as a writer online? Perhaps one metric of success is getting people you respect and admire to link to your writing in an organic, natural way (that is, without asking them to).
  • Steve Yegge indicated he may blog anonymously or not at all in the future. We suspect that Steve’s high profile as a notable software blogger makes it difficult for him at Google, which is a notoriously secretive company. Not Apple secretive, mind you, but close. We agree that as much as Steve writes, it’s coming out of him one way or the other, but unfortunately it may be anonymous from this point on.
  • If we can render virtual 3D worlds at 60 frames per second, why haven’t our software development IDEs evolved much beyond ASCII text for layout? How about visual comments? And Lutz Roeder wonders about Interactive Source Code (ppt). Why not have diagrams in the code, or even better, dynamic visualization of the data structures in that code?
  • My thoughts on what it takes to build a killer IDE. I’m still waiting, by the way.
  • An analysis of what it takes to have a vibrant add-in ecosystem, while still folding in the most popular add-ins to the core of the product, where they rightfully belong. This is a fine line to walk, particularly for commercial software.
  • It really is amazing how many problems go away when your software is all open source. Except for the “how do we pay our employees” one.
  • How much feedback should job interview candidates get when the interview doesn’t work out? Joel and I have an extended discussion. This is a lot tricker than it seems at first glance. At some level, perhaps you have to treat job interviews (particularly at extremely selective companies like Fog Creek) like romantic relationships — sometimes there just isn’t chemistry. Rather than over-analyze it, learn what you can, and move on to the next relationship.
  • Don’t ask what programming language beginning programmers should learn — ask what type of programming do you want to train people to do! Do you want to teach theory, or skill?
  • Joel’s example of the MIT curriculum of robot programming is a fantastic one: “what they care about is not the actual language. It’s not a matter of teaching you the Python, it’s teaching you to be a programmer in an environment where everything is constantly falling down around you, nothing as works as documented, even if there were documentation, and there isn’t, and if there was documentation, it was probably written by a technical writer who was afraid to go into the programmer’s offices because the last time she went in she got her head bitten off.”
  • How to deal with headstrong know-it-all beginning programmers? Been there, done that. And by that I mean I was one, too. You have to fail. In fact, make them fail, if you can. As Joel says, they have to learn that “no code that you write can ever possibly work.” We know. Alternately, throw a copy of Code Complete at them, if they’re in a place where they can actually learn from it.
  • Possibly one of the worst scenarios for beginning programmers is to be in a company where everyone is a beginning programmer. It does help to have some seasoned veterans in the mix, otherwise you’re basically living out Lord of the Flies — and if you don’t know who Piggy is, then it’s you.

We answered the following listener questions on this podcast:

  1. “I read on Steve Yegge’s blog that he’s not going to blog any more. What are your thoughts on this?”
  2. Chris: “Can you point to a particular article or time where you realized that your blog was going somewhere?”
  3. Ohad: “Why can’t rich comment be put in source code as comments? Why not use images, document snippets, and so forth?”

Our favorite Stack Overflow questions this week are:

If you’d like to submit a question to be answered in our next episode, record an audio file (90 seconds or less) and mail it to [email protected]. You can record a question using nothing but a telephone and a web browser. We also have a dedicated phone number you can call to leave audio questions at 646-826-3879.

The transcript wiki for this episode is available for public editing.

Podcast #54

05-21-09 by Jeff Atwood. 21 comments

This is the 54th episode of the StackOverflow podcast where Joel and Jeff discuss bespoke software development, URL routing, the God Algorithm, and getting your database under version control.

  • We need to talk to you about your flair. Specifically, your User Flair! It’s a small badge you can embed in your own website to show off your identity and “street cred”, such as it is, on Stack Overflow and Server Fault. If that’s not enough, you can also put it on a t-shirt. Or dress up like the Facebook guy. Hey man, these are your life choices, not ours!
  • A brief discussion of how ASP.NET MVC URL routes should be declared. We do it through an custom attribute attached to the top of the method signature, which we feel provides excellent locality of information.
  • Part of the promise of Stack Overflow was that it would be run by the community. We are trying to continue delivering on that promise by electing new community moderators, and having a moderation policy that all the moderators (including the core team) abide by.
  • Speaking of Stack Overflow DevDays, “the” Jon Skeet is confirmed to be a speaker at the London DevDays; Scott Hanselman will be at the Seattle and San Francisco DevDays.
  • We now have better, AJAX-y support for handling duplicate questions. We believe duplicate mapping is mostly a human-driven task, but we want to streamline the workflow as much as possible.
  • Part of our development style on Stack Overflow is to build features as they become needed, rather than coding speculatively, trying to guess what will become important later. Our UserVoice site has been very helpful in this regard, as we try mightily to retire the top rated user feature requests and bugs. Well, the ones we agree with, anyway..
  • How do you bid on software development projects without cutting corners and still stay competitive? Joel shares his thoughts. “Your job is not to deliver a spec, it’s to step into the client’s shoes and figure out what their problem is, and how it can be solved with computers.”
  • I maintain this is the blessing and curse of contract software development — you are a proxy employee during the contract. This can be good, if it’s a client you like and have empathy with, or it can be bad, if it’s a client that you don’t respect, or that you have absolutely nothing in common with. Would you work for that company?
  • On the topic of bespoke software, Joel recommends the oddly named book How to Castrate a Bull: Unexpected Lessons on Risk, Growth, and Success in Business. Consider selling coffee makers to a hotel — hotels don’t really want a bunch of coffee machines (even if that’s what they ask for), they want a system that guarantees they never have to think about coffee makers in their rooms again. This is what it means to be “enterprisey”. This is what big consulting firms do.
  • If you’re worried about backdoors in your code, first, don’t work with scumbags. But if you work at an industry where there is a lot of risk, such as banking, then you need an audit trail on everything, and perhaps an internal audit department that does nothing other than check things periodically. A certain percentage of random auditing may be preferable to strict gates on every action.
  • A discussion of O(1), which sort of seems like “The God Algorithm” at first glance. But you do have to define how ‘big’ that 1 is. There are dimensions of space and time here that aren’t immediately apparent.
  • One quirk of keeping your database under version control is that you have to make a distinction between the schema, the data, and the fixed data. At the very least, have tools that let you diff your database! And ideally integrate with your build and deployment. Have you looked at the Rails way of handling database changes, with Migrations?
  • Thanks to our podcast sponsor, Mint — they’re looking for a great developer!

We answered the following listener questions on this podcast:

  1. “Is it true that the more the complex the software system is, the simpler it is to manage, because there are more rules defining its behavior?”
  2. “How do you win software development contracts, while still delivering quality?” Based on an existing question.
  3. “How do you deal with a large codebase, and disgruntled employees leaving backdoors in the code?”

Our favorite Stack Overflow questions this week are:

If you’d like to submit a question to be answered in our next episode, record an audio file (90 seconds or less) and mail it to [email protected]. You can record a question using nothing but a telephone and a web browser. We also have a dedicated phone number you can call to leave audio questions at 646-826-3879.

The transcript wiki for this episode is available for public editing.

Podcast #53

05-13-09 by Jeff Atwood. 14 comments

This is the 53rd episode of the StackOverflow podcast where Joel and Jeff sit down with Wil Shipley of Delicious Monster to discuss the shifting sands of Apple and Microsoft APIs, the value of software development conferences, intuition versus empiricism for developers, and “parrot programming”.

  • Like all the coolest developers, Wil wrote a web browser. And he’s not shy about mentioning it!
  • Wil and Joel reminisce about NeXT computers, Steve Jobs’ gig after he was unceremoniously ousted from Apple by John Sculley. Wil wrote a lot of Objective C for NeXT before it was popularized on the Mac.
  • We complain about the fact that Microsoft seems to release a new framework every other year that seems to obsolete the previous framework, as famously documented in Joel’s article How Microsoft Lost the API War.
  • Joel announces Stack Overflow Developer Days, in the platform agnostic spirit of the site. Five cities, a great set of speakers from many different disciplines, one day, $99. And yes, we’re trying to get Wil Shipley to speak at the San Francisco leg.
  • Wil has some fantastic advice for software entrepreneurs — witness his presentation How to Succeed Writing Mac Software (pdf). It motivated at least one developer to enter the priesthood.
  • Some thoughts on the utility of conferences for software developers. You should probably try to go to one conference per year, either because you’re interested in the speakers, or you’re interested in networking with other programmers. Beyond that, the benefits are unclear.
  • Wil notes that WWDC is a unique opportunity to get a lot of your detailed Mac programming questions answered by the people who wrote the APIs. Remember, one of the biggest reason to attend these conference is to hang out in the hallways with your fellow developers!
  • I don’t think the legendary Apple secrecy is a good strategy for a developer platform. Witness the absurdity of the iPhone developer NDA.
  • On the other hand, all those developers who learned about WinFS at Microsoft conferences from 2005 to 2007 must be a little cheesed that the feature never shipped. So it is possible to talk about stuff too early.
  • Wil Shipley is also agnostic about unit testing: Unit Testing is Teh Suck, Urr. Isn’t using programs to test programs a case of “who watches the watchmen”? Also, is every bug ultimately worth fixing?
  • Is excessive reliance on unit testing a case of Empiricists versus Intuitionists, as dramatized in the book The Intuitionist? As you get more years of programming experience under your belt, you could argue that you have a (slightly) better “spider sense” of what the problem areas may possibly be in your code. Ideally you should use both empiricism and intuition, of course. Nobody programs using the force. Well, except for Knuth.
  • Even a programmer as experienced as Wil occasionally runs afoul of the First Rule of Programming: It’s Always Your Fault. His anecdote involves writing an email to a VP at Apple, though. Humility is often the best approach; “I think I’m doing something wrong here, can you help me figure this out?”
  • Joel says no question is too simple for Stack Overflow, and we discourage people from responding with RTFM or “too trivial to even ask”. These questions may be simple, but think about each question in terms of future programmers who might encounter this question; is it relevant enough to the world to help them, and not just the one guy or gal with that one ultra-narrow question? If so, then it’s worth asking.
  • Joel calls it page faulting in knowledge. Wil calls it “parrot programming”: newbie programmers who don’t really understand what they’re doing, but occasionally get a search result cracker, so that particular programming behavior is rewarded and reinforced. This is why we encourage neophyte programmers to buy a few key programming books, so they can underpin their giant heap of randomly page faulted knowledge with deeper principles and concepts.

We answered the following listener questions on this podcast:

  1. Kris: “What are your thoughts on the value of attending conferences?”
  2. Clay: “As you become a more experienced programmer, do you use more intuition as a part of your decision making?”

Our favorite Stack Overflow qustions this week are:

If you’d like to submit a question to be answered in our next episode, record an audio file (90 seconds or less) and mail it to [email protected]. You can record a question using nothing but a telephone and a web browser. We also have a dedicated phone number you can call to leave audio questions at 646-826-3879.

The transcript wiki for this episode is available for public editing.

Podcast #52

05-06-09 by Jeff Atwood. 31 comments

This is the 52nd episode of the StackOverflow podcast — our one year anniversary — where Joel and Jeff discuss the launch of Server Fault, how you determine if your code is smelly (or just aromatic), how programmers learn by doing, and how good ideas are often too crazy to copy until it’s too late.

  • We’ve been podcasting for one full year now. Hopefully we’ve gotten better at this podcast stuff and not worse, but the jury is still out.
  • Server Fault, the first sister site to Stack Overflow, is now in private beta. Server Fault is for system administrators and IT professionals. If that’s you, come join us!
  • We’ve only done one major branch in Stack Overflow to date, and it was excruciatingly painful in Subversion, even after updating to 1.6 which has “better” support for merging. We’re considering switching to Mercurial to make future merges feel a bit less like gnawing our own limbs off.
  • Joel announces that Fog Creek is working on a hosted version of Stack Overflow, and they are looking to hire a software engineer to work on the project. If it works out, you get the whole Fog Creek relocation package! If you’ve ever wanted to work on the Stack Overflow codebase (and you’re looking for a full time gig) this is your chance!
  • The prospect of an outside developer looking at our Stack Overflow code base makes us nervous. Maybe this is a healthy reaction — is any code ever good enough? Probably not.
  • We do believe in continuous refactoring, and part of that is developing free from fear. Don’t be afraid to break stuff! Have some unit tests, and when things do break, be able to fix it very rapidly.
  • Test Driven Development is possibly the worst and most incorrect name ever applied to a concept in software engineering, ever. And that’s saying a lot. TDD is more about design than testing, but when every TDD tutorial starts with “ok, we write a test to verify..” it’s sort of hard to justify. Perhaps Behavior Driven Development would be a better name.
  • TDD, as far as testing is concerned may be a bit too programmatic. Never underestimate the power of a skilled human tester.
  • We learned ASP.NET MVC as we went. This is a surprisingly common pattern; Joel can’t ever remember a time when he wasn’t building a new application in a new framework. Programming is, almost by definition, continuously learning: your entire career will be one long, unbroken string of learning one new bit of technology after another. Programming is shorthand for learning how to learn.
  • Joel asks: as a professional programmer, how often do you start a new major project that’s going to have a long life expectancy? It’s startlingly rare. Even at Fog Creek they’ve had maybe four in the entire time the company has existed. So when you start a new project, you almost have to bet on the new framework that you think will be vibrant and alive five years from now — that means you’ll be learning as you go, again! There is a double whammy of learning the framework and a language at the same time though — that’s extra-risky.
  • A brief discussion of why unconfirmed “no-touch” user actions are so dangerous on the web; they are a XSRF playground! If the user holds a cookie to your site, and an attacker can get them to click on a GET or POST, they have just forced the user to take that action. We added an interstitial confirmation to a few actions to prevent this; the particular case that was extremely dangerous was associating a new OpenID provider in one click. If that OpenID provider was rogue and controlled by the attacker, they now own the account.
  • Joel notes that if you’re shy about putting things online, you are letting other people control your online identity — and that will hurt you much more in the long run than any potentially questionable things you might possibly put online.
  • One of the goals of creating Stack Overflow was as a vehicle to build your online identity as a professional programmer, a virtual set of bread crumbs showing that you indeed know your stuff, and your programming peers recognize you for your knowledge.
  • Joel gave a speech about Stack Overflow at Google recently. What question did Guido van Rossum, the creator of Python, ask?
  • A brief mention of stackoverflowoverflow … overflow.
  • By the time anyone tries to copy an iPod, Apple is already a generation ahead. Continual innovation and evolution is always the best approach to defeat those who would blindly copy what you’re doing, and that goes double for software which is infinitely malleable. If your software isn’t continually evolving, it is effectively dead!
  • Good ideas sound too crazy for anyone to even consider copying them. The type of people who copy are not interested in anything that remotely resembles risk; they are only going to copy proven successes. So if you’re starting out with a new crazy idea (and you should be!), this is unlikely to be a practical concern.
  • Joel’s computer has apparently been taken over by a mexican wrestler named Gordo. I have no idea.

We answered the following listener questions on this podcast:

  1. Paul: “I’ve seen some companies do background checks online with MySpace, Facebook, Twitter, etcetera. Should developers be concerned about old, embarrassing code being posted online?”
  2. Tom: “As a startup entrepreneur, what steps should you take, if any, to protect your intellectual property?”

Our favorite Stack Overflow qustions this week are:

None! Every single Server Fault question I’ve asked is my favorite this week! I’ve had all these sysadmin and IT pro questions welling up inside me for months, and it was so intensely satisfying to finally be able to ask them and get really great answers. Please join us in the beta!

If you’d like to submit a question to be answered in our next episode, record an audio file (90 seconds or less) and mail it to [email protected]. You can record a question using nothing but a telephone and a web browser. We also have a dedicated phone number you can call to leave audio questions at 646-826-3879.

The transcript wiki for this episode is available for public editing.