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Topic: podcasts

Yet Another Reason to Dislike France

08-25-09 by Jeff Atwood. 32 comments

Joel’s vacation in France is going so very swimmingly that he has declined to participate in the Stack Overflow podcast for yet another week.

Le France

I’m not one to judge, but apparently Joel loves France more than he loves Stack Overflow. I’m just sayin’.

But, maybe we can pull something together sans Joel. There are some ideas on meta for the as-yet-unrecorded Podcast #66, so feel free to go in there and upvote or add your own.

(disclaimer: I’m just kidding, I have nothing against France. It’s Australia that really sucks.)

Podcast #65

08-12-09 by Jeff Atwood. 47 comments

In this episode of the podcast, Joel and Jeff discuss lessons from a year of building Stack Overflow, the mysteries of COBOL, some YSlow website optimizations, and magic numbers.

  • What have we learned in a year of building Stack Overflow? If someone wanted to design a system like Stack overflow, I’d give them these two pieces of advice. First, never have any unbounded behavior in your website. Anywhere. Bounding, velocity and rate limiting, should be pervasive throughout your design from day one. Second, provide an outlet for meta discussion from day one. Unless you provide a teacher’s lounge, or afterschool activities for the students, you haven’t completed the experience.
  • In our experience, the best way to manage online behavior is to make the positive behaviors fun and rewarding. If you do this right, the bad and negative behaviors fall by the wayside. (Although you also, regrettably, will still need tools for dealing with rare but aberrant behavior.)
  • Neither Joel or I have ever met a COBOL programmer. That’s why we’re skeptical of these dramatic claims that the world is overrun with invisible COBOL code. There are, surprisingly, some good COBOL questions on Stack Overflow, but it’s a tiny fraction.
  • How much COBOL code can you fit in the 1 megabyte (at most!) memory that these 60′s and 70′s era servers had? Or the tiny hard drives? 
  • Is what happened to COBOL programmers eventually what happens to all programmers? Take SQL as an example. If you have 256 gigabytes of main memory — not very expensive already, and getting cheaper every day — is all that SQL and disk stuff still relevant?
  • We recently spent some time improving performance on Stack Overflow, and as always we’ve learned that whatever we think is slow, is not, and the part that is slow is in a totally unexpected area of our code. Never assume you know where a performance problem is, because I can almost guarantee you’re wrong. Profile it and look at the data!
  • We’ve seen huge benefits, more than anticipated, by moving our static web content to a seperate, cookieless domain. (We registered sstatic.net for this purpose, which explains the rationale.) This is one of the key recommendations from tools like YSlow and Google Page Speed. It’s a surprisingly effective form of poor man’s web farm scaling.
  • A brief digression into the “why does anyone still use IE6″ argument. Here’s Microsoft’s official position, as crazy as it may seem.
  • We may be at the end of the road for the low hanging fruit of website performance optimizations. Of course we can always buy faster hardware. But that doesn’t fix the speed of light problem. Given our large international audience, I sort of wish we could have multiple server farms in different geographic locations, but that may be quite a long way off.
  • Computer “magic number” number bugs are kind of fun; you may remember a very public Excel bug in this vein. Joel once got a credit card with an expiration date set in 2049, which is technically valid, but it barely worked anywhere.

Our favorite questions this week:

If you’d like to submit a question to be answered in our next episode, record an audio file (90 seconds or less) and mail it to [email protected]. You can record a question using nothing but a telephone and a web browser. We also have a dedicated phone number you can call to leave audio questions at 646-826-3879.

The transcript wiki for this episode is available for public editing.

Podcast #64

08-05-09 by Jeff Atwood. 43 comments

Joel and Jeff discuss the disappointment of Google AdSense, the difference in skillset between programmers and testers, and the value of standards groups to working programmers.

  • If you have feedback for Stack Exchange (still scheduled for beta by September 1st), please leave it on meta.stackoverflow.com under the Stack Exchange tag.
  • The speaker list for Stack Overflow DevDays is coming soon, it’s looking really impressive so far. For example, both John Resig (of jQuery fame) and Miguel De Icaza (of Mono fame) will be at the Boston leg, and there are still seats available! There’s also a rumor that Jeff Atwood, whoever that guy is, may show up in London.
  • We are forming a League of Justice on the web. The first new hero in our league is How-To Geek, of the most excellent How-To Geek website. It’s the editorially cultivated content yin to our user-generated yang.
  • On the crushing disappointment of Google AdSense on Stack Overflow. The theory of AdSense, matching topical ads to the content on the page, is fantastic. The reality of the type of ads we actually saw on Stack Overflow is a terrible disappointment. They were barely relevant, and often quite ugly.
  • Our hand-selected ads, targetted to our audience, perform 50 times better than AdSense. We believe that if Google could somehow tag a site with a specific audience topic (such as, say, “programmers”) it would do much better.
  • If a site like Stack Overflow, which does almost a million pageviews a day, can’t make enough to cover even one person at half time using Google AdSense, how does anyone make a living with AdSense? Does it even work?
  • Joel says the only people making decent money with AdSense are scammers who specifically build websites to do nothing except target high pay-per-click keywords. I am not sure this is what Google had in mind. It is a stunning indictment of “the power of the algorithm”.
  • Our ad partner is Alex from The Daily WTF, and we take responsible advertising seriously. The right kind of advertising, the relevant, interesting, thoughtful kind is win-win. And always in moderation. We are willing to leave money on the table to have the right kind of ads that we like editorially.
  • Joel has a great discussion about the difference in skillset between a good tester and a good programmer. “There’s something about the nature of the work that’s different enough that a lot of good developers are bored by testing, and a lot of testers are too detail-oriented to get anything done as a developer.” Some programming skills are helpful, but they’re different.
  • There is great risk in creating standards in advance — how do you know if you’re solving a problem people care about, or even the right problem in the first place? Also, the disconnect between the theory and practice can be rather painful.
  • Who can we blame for the codified misspelling of “referer”? I would like to have some words with this person.
  • We frequently use Stack Overflow to build Stack Overflow. It’s almost a recursive endeavor. If you browse the questions the team asks on Stack Overflow or Server Fault, many of them are directly related to development and deployment issues on the sites themselves!

Our favorite questions this week are both from Super User, which for now is still in semi-private beta. If you need the password it is “ewok.adventure” without the quotes.

We answered the following listener questions on this podcast:

  1. Adam: “The Fog Creek way of hiring programmers has been well documented. What about hiring testers, and how they fit into your view of how software should be built?”
  2. Kevin: “What do you see as the role of standards committees in the development community?”
  3. George: “You talked about open sourcing Stack Overflow. Why not just write a book about it?”

If you’d like to submit a question to be answered in our next episode, record an audio file (90 seconds or less) and mail it to [email protected]. You can record a question using nothing but a telephone and a web browser. We also have a dedicated phone number you can call to leave audio questions at 646-826-3879.

The transcript wiki for this episode is available for public editing.

Podcast #63

07-29-09 by Jeff Atwood. 38 comments

In this episode of the podcast, Joel and Jeff discuss the Mythical Man Month problem, keeping communication in check, Windows 7, and web scaling.

  • Joel is fielding his largest team ever at Fog Creek — 9 programmers, 2 testers, and 2 program managers. They only have 10 usable weeks in the summer to build a product with their interns, so they have to parallelize their development.
  • Contrary to popular myth, it is possible for a large team to be effective, if you mitigate the Mythical Man Month problem, which is really only about adding people to a late project and bringing them up to speed.
  • How do you deal with an excess of communication (the explosion of paths) on larger teams? First, with program managers. That’s what they are there to address, by becoming the conduit for communication. Second, constantly try to reduce the number of meetings and people in meetings. 
  • Speaking of communication excess, is email = efail? This is also why I believe in maximizing the value of your keystrokes, and the value of public communication. If you must email someone, keep it extremely short, a paragraph at most, with a direct question and call to action that is obvious and clear.
  • One thought experiment: what would happen if all your email became Twitter messages? Or, as Joel proposes, is online communication itself a failed paradigm? At the very least, know the limitations of the communication medium you’re using, and escalate as necessary.
  • Some classes of plugins that can complement a product without competing with it: plugins that make the UI complex or dangerous, plugins that require a subscription fee, plugins that compete with the core business model of the product, and plugins that connect to a different commercial product.
  • Products that have a vibrant plugin ecosystem and API are almost by definition successful products. It also creates a sort of weird ambient lock-in around the ecosystem, as in Lotus 1-2-3 macros, or Firefox users who won’t switch browsers due to their favorite plugins.
  • A brief discussion of Windows 7, which has much more “curb appeal” than Vista. Joel was not a fan of Vista; I was. And Windows 7 is the best Vista service pack ever.
  • Stack Overflow almost reached a million pageviews per day last week, and we’re consistently doing around 120 requests/sec, or 7200 requests/minute. We’re starting to hit peaks of about 80% CPU usage on our single web server, so we may have to add a second webserver to the SO farm soon.
  • Speaking of sticky sessions, we were surprised to find that there are those rare few users whose IP addresses will change radically from request to request.
  • We are a Microsoft stack so we’re looking at Velocity to share state across multiple webservers. It’s a clone of memcached.
  • Scaling problems are easy to solve. Just throw money at them, like 37signals recently did. The “getting people to give a crap about your application” problem does not respond to money in the same way.
  • We run a number of LogParser queries on our webserver logs to identify statistically anomalous things that are happening on our website — what sorts of queries do you run on your web logs to show unusual activity? One of the weirder spiders that’s hitting us a lot is Omgili, a sort of forum search tool.

Our favorite question this week is from Server Fault:

  • Recommended LogParser queries for IIS monitoring? This is an example of putting the sort of information out into the world that we’d like to see exist — as well as documenting and sharing our own experience in hosting what is now a fairly large public website.

If you’d like to submit a question to be answered in our next episode, record an audio file (90 seconds or less) and mail it to [email protected]. You can record a question using nothing but a telephone and a web browser. We also have a dedicated phone number you can call to leave audio questions at 646-826-3879.

The transcript wiki for this episode is available for public editing.

Podcast #62

07-22-09 by Jeff Atwood. 35 comments

In this episode of the Stack Overflow podcast, Joel and Jeff discuss software updates, the power of APIs and plugins, and leading by example.

  • A brief discussion of how software should be updated, using Firefox and Apple’s Software Updater as examples. In a perfect world, you wouldn’t need to care about software updates because you’d always be on the latest version. A smart and silent update mechanism should be architected into your app from day one.
  • Web apps largely get a pass on the “latest version” problem, but even here, you could update smart by having multiple web servers behind a load balancer, and rotating some servers out of service to update, then back in with the latest version.
  • Speaking of software updates, Fog Bugz 7 has shipped. It’s the first new version in two years, with a brand new, extensive plugin API.
  • Joel wonders if having a robust plugin model can replace the need to constantly ship new major versions of your software with new features. I question whether Fog Creek got their plugin API right the first time, but if done right, this is totally plausible.
  • I view plugins as free product design and highly valuable product feedback — so you should fold the top 5 plugins / add-ons into your product every year or so. But how do you do this without crushing your partners in the ecosystem? There are plenty of examples of popular iPhone paid apps being obsoleted by, say, iPhone OS 3.0. Joel argues that plugins should go vertical, and stay out of the path of that oncoming steamroller.
  • Now that we have four sites in the er.. trilogy.. it is finally possible to associate your accounts between the sites, and migrate questions fairly painlessly from site to site.
  • Sometimes we belatedly realize that we got something wrong. We’re now thinking that our current +10 upvote, -2 downvote formula nerfs downvotes into oblivion, and lets certain classes of users who tend to ask a lot of low-quality “do my work for me” questions gain a substantial amount of reputation over time. We are pondering making an adjustment here, which is under discussion at meta.stackoverflow.com.
  • Maybe we should be weighting question votes differently, since users who continue to repeatedly ask dozens of low quality questions are still an ongoing concern. As we get more and more questions in the system, the voting system needs to help us discriminate good questions from poor ones, so we want to encourage question votes.
  • There is now officially a full time Fog Creek developer working on Stack Exchange — welcome Aaron Maenpaa to the team! On a related note, one advantage of open source tooling is that you don’t have to have painful discussions about licensing expenses and whether the tool is worth using as your team grows.
  • R language enthusiasts are taking a clever and effective approach to get more R content on Stack Overflow — we think this is a great way to build a community that is completely in tune with the spirit of the site.
  • In the post Leading by Example, I proposed that one of the best ways (maybe the only way?) to lead junior programmers is to do the things you wish they’d do, and let them observe your success. Those that can be led, will follow to some degree, and the rest are a lost cause.
  • Let’s broaden the terms. Forget programmers, how do you get pizza guys or car wash guys to get excited about what they do? Joel says you can’t. I say there has to be some kind of hippie commune shared ownership business arrangement. At the very least, you can become interested in efficiency, since that might mean you could leave earlier, make more money, or work less.

We answered the following listener questions on this podcast:

  1. J.D. Long: “The R language is attempting to move away from isolated mailing list and adopt Stack Overflow as a resource. What’s a good way to do this?”
  2. Sergei: “I am a programmer in a small IT company. I often see my junior teammates program things that are not optimal. I try to help them, but they’ve complained to my manager. What should I do about this?”

Our favorite site questions this week are:

  • DNS failing to propagate worldwide. I used this as an example of asking a question the right way, in that you put some effort into the question — research the problem first and provide all the information necessary for people to help you.

If you’d like to submit a question to be answered in our next episode, record an audio file (90 seconds or less) and mail it to [email protected]. You can record a question using nothing but a telephone and a web browser. We also have a dedicated phone number you can call to leave audio questions at 646-826-3879.

The transcript wiki for this episode is available for public editing.