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Podcast #70

10-14-09 by Jeff Atwood. 29 comments

In this episode of the podcast, Joel and Jeff discuss DevDays, the diversity of Stack Exchange sites, the debut of CVs and careers on Stack Overflow, and the viability of WiFi at tech conferences.

  • Stack Exchange is now officially in public beta! There are a huge number of sites running on the Stack Overflow engine. Far more than I expected at this early stage, anyway.
  • The Stack Exchange sites are pushing the boundaries of the specific audience (that is, programmers) we designed it for. Consider the audience overlap between answers.onstartups.com, epicadvice.com, and moms4mom.com. I was getting usability reports from my wife on that last one, which was quite surreal. Also surreal: that Jon Skeet is a top user on one of the above. You’ll never guess which one!
  • Do some of the Stack Exchange sites compete with Stack Overflow? Such as ask.sqlteam.com and snippetgood.com? Not necessarily; if you’re particularly enthusiastic about some niche, you’ll get more questions and tighter focus of community by going to site dedicated to that topic. 
  • Joel feels that Stack Exchange works so well as a support forum that he’s shutting down all the other online FogBugz web support tools in favor of fogbugz.stackexchange.com.
  • What’s the minimum number of knowledgable, invested users you need to have a functional online Q&A community? Joel says one (!). I think it’s more on the order of a few dozen. The software part is easy, the real hurdle is this: can you rustle together a core community of a few dozen enthusiastic, knowledgable folks?
  • An extended discussion of our new careers section of Stack Overflow, which we launched last week. Joel sort of wrote the book on this topic, with Smart and Gets Things Done: Joel Spolsky’s Concise Guide to Finding the Best Technical Talent. Our careers approach grows out of Joel (and my) dissatisfaction with the current status quo. It sucks, and we’d like to build something better.
  • This is the philosophy behind careers.stackoverflow.com : smart companies should be pursuing good programmers, and not the other way around. We also want to cut out the cheesy for-pay contingency recruiters (or any other middlemen, for that matter) from the mix, and directly connect passionate programmers with companies that understand the value of programmers who hit the high notes.
  • This is Fog Creek’s guarantee for every service they charge money for: “The Fog Creek Promise: If you’re not satisfied, for any reason, within 90 days you get a full refund, period, no questions asked. We don’t want your money if you’re not amazingly happy.” Stack Overflow has adopted this promise as well. Why don’t all companies do this? Why would you want to keep an unsatisified customer’s money — it generates ill will far out of proportion to the tiny amount of money involved.
  • As a part of careers, we’re planning to roll out free, public CVs with user-selectable “vanity” URLs in a week or two. In retrospect, we should have done this from day one, as it compliments the public record of your Q&A on Stack Overflow. As Joel notes, the best way to control your online presence is to fill it yourself with all the cool stuff you’ve been doing! Don’t let others tell the story of you when you can tell it yourself.

Our favorite question this week is from Server Fault:

If you’d like to submit a question to be answered in our next episode, record an audio file (90 seconds or less) and mail it to podcast@stackoverflow.com. You can record a question using nothing but a telephone and a web browser. We also have a dedicated phone number you can call to leave audio questions at 646-826-3879.

The transcript wiki for this episode is available for public editing.

Podcast #69

09-30-09 by Jeff Atwood. 25 comments

Joel and Jeff sit down with Peter Seibel to discuss his new book Coders At Work, the effect of listening to music while coding, and the future of programming books.

  • Peter draws on some commonalities in the 15 famous programmers he interviewed for Coders at Work.
  • Peter agrees with Joel that concurrent (threaded) programming is some of the hardest programming anyone can do — even the extraordinary programmers he interviewed concur on this point.
  • Susan Lammers’ book Programmers at Work was the early inspiration for Coders at Work. It’s a similarly fantastic read. The other book in the same series, Founders at Work, is a great (albeit less technical) too.
  • Many of the programmers interviewed (with the lone exception of Brad Fitzpatrick) got their start before home microcomputers such as the Apple II were even available. But they all spent deep, huge hands-on volumes of time on a computer, somehow.
  • One big sea change in the last 30 years of programming: per Jamie Zawinski, “these days, almost all software is social software”. The days of the solitary, disconnected programmer toiling away in a server room are essentially over.
  • Even a hardcore game programmer like John Carmack (who, sadly, could not be reached for interview in Peter’s book) has gone on record with a back to basics approach: “if I were off by myself, I would want to become an iPhone game developer.”
  • Does listening to music affect your ability to program, positively or negatively? Joel cites one unpublished study, then goes on to mention that he occasionally watches video while programming. Is there any actual, verifiable data on this either way?
  • Have we passed through the “golden age” of technical books? Are technical books dead? What niche will books fill for programmers in the future? Joel and I both remember poring over programming manuals in great detail in the early days because there were no other sources.

We answered the following listener question this week:

Stuart: “Do you have any opinions on listening to music while coding? Is this a viable alternative to having a private office?”

Our favorite questions this week:

If you’d like to submit a question to be answered in our next episode, record an audio file (90 seconds or less) and mail it to podcast@stackoverflow.com. You can record a question using nothing but a telephone and a web browser. We also have a dedicated phone number you can call to leave audio questions at 646-826-3879.

The transcript wiki for this episode is available for public editing.

Podcast #68

09-17-09 by Jeff Atwood. 14 comments

Joel and Jeff discuss outsourced DNS, virtual machine “appliances”, and programmers as library users versus library writers.

  • As a dyed in the wool fan of fake plastic rock, I am required by law to mention that The Beatles: Rock Band was released last week. It’s great!
  • We changed DNS providers, as our existing registrar’s DNS service was highly … irregular.
  • Should you pay for outsourced, dedicated DNS? What do you get for that money? What kinds of value can outsourced DNS provide? What clever things can a smart DNS provider do?
  • If you need to troubleshoot your DNS, try DNS Stuff.
  • DNS is heavily cached throughout the internet, but I think we overestimate how efficient these distributed caches are. For example, Yahoo found that 40-60 percent of their users have an empty browser cache experience. There is value in having a fast, distributed core service for the no-cache scenario.
  • A brief discussion of our use of virtual machines in our little server farm. Since the only trouble spot for VM performance is disk, that gives us the flexibility of using a lot of great Linux and open source tools for networking (no or very little disk dependency), such as HAProxy and Cacti.
  • Sometimes people should question the premise of your question; as in our Server Fault question about having two default gateways, it turns out that the only sane answer is “don’t do that.”
  • When it comes to Stack Exchange, the broader the topic, and the more unanswerable questions you have, the worse the engine will do for you. The engine is designed for reasonably narrow topics, with a majority of questions that can actually be answered in some reasonable way.
  • Joel likens the classic divide in software developers to “library users versus library writers”. At what point do programmers cross that chasm? Do they need to? Joel says “we write one algorithm per year.”
  • How do you deal with the dancing bunnies problem? Also known as the Dancing pigs problem. “Given a choice between dancing pigs and security, users will pick dancing pigs every time.”

We answered the following listener questions this week:

  • Steve: “The etiquette rules for meta are much looser than on the other Trilogy sites. Does this have ramifications for Stack Exchange sites?”
  • Brian: “Technology changes so fast that most developers burn out in 20 years. How do we retain our historical knowledge if the rate of attrition is so high?”

Our favorite questions this week:

If you’d like to submit a question to be answered in our next episode, record an audio file (90 seconds or less) and mail it to podcast@stackoverflow.com. You can record a question using nothing but a telephone and a web browser. We also have a dedicated phone number you can call to leave audio questions at 646-826-3879.

The transcript wiki for this episode is available for public editing.

Podcast #67

09-10-09 by Jeff Atwood. 49 comments

In this episode of the Stack Overflow podcast, Joel and Jeff discuss the ethics of Craigslist, the pitfalls of customer-installable software, and caching for anonymous web users.

  • If you’d like a Stack Overflow, Server Fault, or Super User sticker, you can now get three! Just send a SASE to Fog Creek software as documented in this blog post. Please don’t start a Ponzi scheme with those international reply coupons, though!
  • There was a excellent, huge Wired article on the pros and cons of Craigslist, titled Why Craigslist is Such a Mess. I am mentioned in the article, as an example of someone who created an tool to do all-city search that got shut down by Craiglist, which is quite militant about controlling the service.
  • Joel feels that what Craig Newmark is doing with Craigslist is a brand of evil, in that it has destroyed the income stream (classified ads) that supported professional journalism. Craigslist was one of the models we studied extensively when building Stack Overflow, even cribbing their flagging mechanism. Joel and I have an extended discussion about the ethics of Cragislist.
  • Joel and I disagree about the future of professional journalism; I think the newspaper business model was fundamentally flawed. It is tempting to blame Craigslist for the downfall of newspapers, but if it wasn’t Craigslist, someone else would have done the same thing. For a thoughtful discussion of the topic, check out Clay Shirky’s article Newspapers and Thinking the Unthinkable.
  • One side effect of Craigslist being free and incredibly popular (more pageviews than eBay and Amazon combined) is that they are breeding the perfect spammer. We looked at Craigslist as an key example of designing for evil. We suspect that over time Craigslist might have to start charging money for most, if not all categories.
  • Joel’s Stack Exchange playground is biztravel.stackexchange.com, but we need better color schemes. I think we need to have a contest to set some reasonable default color schemes for Stack Exchange customers to choose from.
  • One thing Joel has learned from selling Fogbugz: software designed to be installed on a server in-house at a customer’s site, under full control of that customer, is almost never worth the hassle. Virtual machines, or the software-as-applicance models, are more sustainible. But most companies won’t allow outside vendors to remote into the app to troubleshoot it, either.
  • A tremendously important part of designing a large public website is optimizing for anonymous user access, which will be a large proportion of your traffic. At Stack Overflow, even before our public launch in September, we spent a lot of time ensuring that anonymous usage is aggressively and heavily cached.

Our favorite Stack Overflow trilogy questions this week are:

  • Countdown app for DevDays. Joel needs a cool app to help start DevDays sessions on time! Here’s an opportunity to show off your mad coding skills, and have your software prominently featured at every DevDays venue.

We answered the following listener question on this podcast:

  1. David Smalley from DocType: “Shouldn’t websites optimize heavily for anonymous usage patterns?” Absolutely!

If you’d like to submit a question to be answered in our next episode, record an audio file (90 seconds or less) and mail it to podcast@stackoverflow.com. You can record a question using nothing but a telephone and a web browser. We also have a dedicated phone number you can call to leave audio questions at 646-826-3879.

The transcript wiki for this episode is available for public editing.

 

Podcast #66

09-02-09 by Jeff Atwood. 31 comments

In this episode of the Stack Overflow podcast, Joel and Jeff discuss reverse proxies, the pitfalls of self-support communities, and designing for engagement.

  • It is my intent to attend the London and Cambridge DevDays, if my passport comes back in time. Speaking of which, is there anything funnier than a baby’s passport picture?
  • We officially disabled the built in ASP.NET Session state, so as to set ourselves up for multiple Stack Overflow servers. Fortunately, we don’t need a lot of shared state, but we were using it in a few places. We created a small database table to store the small bits of per-user state that we need.
  • I take an inordinate amount of joy in deleting code from our project. Nothing is more satisfying!
  • To switch over to multiple servers, we need some kind of load balancer. We chose HAProxy, but we also had to configure tproxy (transparent proxy) support so that the IP addresses arriving at the web servers are not all the same.
  • For now we’ll be load balancing using a simple hash of the incoming IP address. Depending on which hash you get, you may end up on a different server, but you’ll stay on that server as long as your IP address is stable. This is a fairly crude form of balancing, but should be sufficient.
  • It’s incredible how aggressive Google’s indexing of our site is; it regularly pulls down a gigabyte of compressed text from us per day, and it wants to do even more. One of the primary motivators for adding a second server is to reduce the traffic load enough so that we can “unleash” google via webmaster tools.
  • A belated welcome to our newest and third site in the trilogy, Super User — it’s for any general computer software or hardware questions, but we’ve already had to disallow videogaming questions.
  • How much overlap will there be between our public websites, and the sites launched through the Stack Exchange service? But remember, the software (however great it may be) is the easy part. Building a community is the truly difficult part! To succeed, that’s what you should focus on.
  • Joel discusses the shifting meaning of “Beta” — it’s been contorted into “the first five years of a product”. But there is an art to the classic beta, in terms of releasing in a staggered fashion to fresh testers who haven’t seen it yet.
  • Google’s self-support model is often unsatisfying because it is community driven, yet the community is powerless and has no real stake in developing the product. They’re given padded rubber rooms to bounce around in harmlessly. That’s not a good way to build community.
  • Google needs a lot more evangelists out there interacting with the community and bringing messages back and forth to the mothership. This is something that Microsoft does extraordinarily well, but Google does not seem to “get it”.
  • A brief discussion of some key changes to (hopefully) increase engagement between question asker and answerers. The goal is for answerers to be able to quickly scan a question and see if they’re dealing with someone who cares, or not.
  • The default votes answer sort order had a flaw: the sub-order was relevant! We now use random as the sub-order to the votes sort, to minimize any effect of the sub-order. Answers will now appear in random order if they have the same number of votes. Answers should be voted up because they’re inherently good answers, not because they happen to accidentally be on top at that particular moment.

We answered the following listener questions on this podcast:

  1. Nathan Long: “Is it valid to discuss iPhone and Blackberry questions on Super User?” This has been discussed on meta.
  2. Brian Kelly: “Is there any formal organization for potential candidates to meet employers at DevDays?”

If you’d like to submit a question to be answered in our next episode, record an audio file (90 seconds or less) and mail it to podcast@stackoverflow.com. You can record a question using nothing but a telephone and a web browser. We also have a dedicated phone number you can call to leave audio questions at 646-826-3879.

The transcript wiki for this episode is available for public editing.