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Podcast #67

09-10-09 by Jeff Atwood. 49 comments

In this episode of the Stack Overflow podcast, Joel and Jeff discuss the ethics of Craigslist, the pitfalls of customer-installable software, and caching for anonymous web users.

  • If you’d like a Stack Overflow, Server Fault, or Super User sticker, you can now get three! Just send a SASE to Fog Creek software as documented in this blog post. Please don’t start a Ponzi scheme with those international reply coupons, though!
  • There was a excellent, huge Wired article on the pros and cons of Craigslist, titled Why Craigslist is Such a Mess. I am mentioned in the article, as an example of someone who created an tool to do all-city search that got shut down by Craiglist, which is quite militant about controlling the service.
  • Joel feels that what Craig Newmark is doing with Craigslist is a brand of evil, in that it has destroyed the income stream (classified ads) that supported professional journalism. Craigslist was one of the models we studied extensively when building Stack Overflow, even cribbing their flagging mechanism. Joel and I have an extended discussion about the ethics of Cragislist.
  • Joel and I disagree about the future of professional journalism; I think the newspaper business model was fundamentally flawed. It is tempting to blame Craigslist for the downfall of newspapers, but if it wasn’t Craigslist, someone else would have done the same thing. For a thoughtful discussion of the topic, check out Clay Shirky’s article Newspapers and Thinking the Unthinkable.
  • One side effect of Craigslist being free and incredibly popular (more pageviews than eBay and Amazon combined) is that they are breeding the perfect spammer. We looked at Craigslist as an key example of designing for evil. We suspect that over time Craigslist might have to start charging money for most, if not all categories.
  • Joel’s Stack Exchange playground is biztravel.stackexchange.com, but we need better color schemes. I think we need to have a contest to set some reasonable default color schemes for Stack Exchange customers to choose from.
  • One thing Joel has learned from selling Fogbugz: software designed to be installed on a server in-house at a customer’s site, under full control of that customer, is almost never worth the hassle. Virtual machines, or the software-as-applicance models, are more sustainible. But most companies won’t allow outside vendors to remote into the app to troubleshoot it, either.
  • A tremendously important part of designing a large public website is optimizing for anonymous user access, which will be a large proportion of your traffic. At Stack Overflow, even before our public launch in September, we spent a lot of time ensuring that anonymous usage is aggressively and heavily cached.

Our favorite Stack Overflow trilogy questions this week are:

  • Countdown app for DevDays. Joel needs a cool app to help start DevDays sessions on time! Here’s an opportunity to show off your mad coding skills, and have your software prominently featured at every DevDays venue.

We answered the following listener question on this podcast:

  1. David Smalley from DocType: “Shouldn’t websites optimize heavily for anonymous usage patterns?” Absolutely!

If you’d like to submit a question to be answered in our next episode, record an audio file (90 seconds or less) and mail it to podcast@stackoverflow.com. You can record a question using nothing but a telephone and a web browser. We also have a dedicated phone number you can call to leave audio questions at 646-826-3879.

The transcript wiki for this episode is available for public editing.

 

Podcast #66

09-02-09 by Jeff Atwood. 31 comments

In this episode of the Stack Overflow podcast, Joel and Jeff discuss reverse proxies, the pitfalls of self-support communities, and designing for engagement.

  • It is my intent to attend the London and Cambridge DevDays, if my passport comes back in time. Speaking of which, is there anything funnier than a baby’s passport picture?
  • We officially disabled the built in ASP.NET Session state, so as to set ourselves up for multiple Stack Overflow servers. Fortunately, we don’t need a lot of shared state, but we were using it in a few places. We created a small database table to store the small bits of per-user state that we need.
  • I take an inordinate amount of joy in deleting code from our project. Nothing is more satisfying!
  • To switch over to multiple servers, we need some kind of load balancer. We chose HAProxy, but we also had to configure tproxy (transparent proxy) support so that the IP addresses arriving at the web servers are not all the same.
  • For now we’ll be load balancing using a simple hash of the incoming IP address. Depending on which hash you get, you may end up on a different server, but you’ll stay on that server as long as your IP address is stable. This is a fairly crude form of balancing, but should be sufficient.
  • It’s incredible how aggressive Google’s indexing of our site is; it regularly pulls down a gigabyte of compressed text from us per day, and it wants to do even more. One of the primary motivators for adding a second server is to reduce the traffic load enough so that we can “unleash” google via webmaster tools.
  • A belated welcome to our newest and third site in the trilogy, Super User — it’s for any general computer software or hardware questions, but we’ve already had to disallow videogaming questions.
  • How much overlap will there be between our public websites, and the sites launched through the Stack Exchange service? But remember, the software (however great it may be) is the easy part. Building a community is the truly difficult part! To succeed, that’s what you should focus on.
  • Joel discusses the shifting meaning of “Beta” — it’s been contorted into “the first five years of a product”. But there is an art to the classic beta, in terms of releasing in a staggered fashion to fresh testers who haven’t seen it yet.
  • Google’s self-support model is often unsatisfying because it is community driven, yet the community is powerless and has no real stake in developing the product. They’re given padded rubber rooms to bounce around in harmlessly. That’s not a good way to build community.
  • Google needs a lot more evangelists out there interacting with the community and bringing messages back and forth to the mothership. This is something that Microsoft does extraordinarily well, but Google does not seem to “get it”.
  • A brief discussion of some key changes to (hopefully) increase engagement between question asker and answerers. The goal is for answerers to be able to quickly scan a question and see if they’re dealing with someone who cares, or not.
  • The default votes answer sort order had a flaw: the sub-order was relevant! We now use random as the sub-order to the votes sort, to minimize any effect of the sub-order. Answers will now appear in random order if they have the same number of votes. Answers should be voted up because they’re inherently good answers, not because they happen to accidentally be on top at that particular moment.

We answered the following listener questions on this podcast:

  1. Nathan Long: “Is it valid to discuss iPhone and Blackberry questions on Super User?” This has been discussed on meta.
  2. Brian Kelly: “Is there any formal organization for potential candidates to meet employers at DevDays?”

If you’d like to submit a question to be answered in our next episode, record an audio file (90 seconds or less) and mail it to podcast@stackoverflow.com. You can record a question using nothing but a telephone and a web browser. We also have a dedicated phone number you can call to leave audio questions at 646-826-3879.

The transcript wiki for this episode is available for public editing.

 

Yet Another Reason to Dislike France

08-25-09 by Jeff Atwood. 32 comments

Joel’s vacation in France is going so very swimmingly that he has declined to participate in the Stack Overflow podcast for yet another week.

Le France

I’m not one to judge, but apparently Joel loves France more than he loves Stack Overflow. I’m just sayin’.

But, maybe we can pull something together sans Joel. There are some ideas on meta for the as-yet-unrecorded Podcast #66, so feel free to go in there and upvote or add your own.

(disclaimer: I’m just kidding, I have nothing against France. It’s Australia that really sucks.)

Podcast #65

08-12-09 by Jeff Atwood. 47 comments

In this episode of the podcast, Joel and Jeff discuss lessons from a year of building Stack Overflow, the mysteries of COBOL, some YSlow website optimizations, and magic numbers.

  • What have we learned in a year of building Stack Overflow? If someone wanted to design a system like Stack overflow, I’d give them these two pieces of advice. First, never have any unbounded behavior in your website. Anywhere. Bounding, velocity and rate limiting, should be pervasive throughout your design from day one. Second, provide an outlet for meta discussion from day one. Unless you provide a teacher’s lounge, or afterschool activities for the students, you haven’t completed the experience.
  • In our experience, the best way to manage online behavior is to make the positive behaviors fun and rewarding. If you do this right, the bad and negative behaviors fall by the wayside. (Although you also, regrettably, will still need tools for dealing with rare but aberrant behavior.)
  • Neither Joel or I have ever met a COBOL programmer. That’s why we’re skeptical of these dramatic claims that the world is overrun with invisible COBOL code. There are, surprisingly, some good COBOL questions on Stack Overflow, but it’s a tiny fraction.
  • How much COBOL code can you fit in the 1 megabyte (at most!) memory that these 60′s and 70′s era servers had? Or the tiny hard drives? 
  • Is what happened to COBOL programmers eventually what happens to all programmers? Take SQL as an example. If you have 256 gigabytes of main memory — not very expensive already, and getting cheaper every day — is all that SQL and disk stuff still relevant?
  • We recently spent some time improving performance on Stack Overflow, and as always we’ve learned that whatever we think is slow, is not, and the part that is slow is in a totally unexpected area of our code. Never assume you know where a performance problem is, because I can almost guarantee you’re wrong. Profile it and look at the data!
  • We’ve seen huge benefits, more than anticipated, by moving our static web content to a seperate, cookieless domain. (We registered sstatic.net for this purpose, which explains the rationale.) This is one of the key recommendations from tools like YSlow and Google Page Speed. It’s a surprisingly effective form of poor man’s web farm scaling.
  • A brief digression into the “why does anyone still use IE6″ argument. Here’s Microsoft’s official position, as crazy as it may seem.
  • We may be at the end of the road for the low hanging fruit of website performance optimizations. Of course we can always buy faster hardware. But that doesn’t fix the speed of light problem. Given our large international audience, I sort of wish we could have multiple server farms in different geographic locations, but that may be quite a long way off.
  • Computer “magic number” number bugs are kind of fun; you may remember a very public Excel bug in this vein. Joel once got a credit card with an expiration date set in 2049, which is technically valid, but it barely worked anywhere.

Our favorite questions this week:

If you’d like to submit a question to be answered in our next episode, record an audio file (90 seconds or less) and mail it to podcast@stackoverflow.com. You can record a question using nothing but a telephone and a web browser. We also have a dedicated phone number you can call to leave audio questions at 646-826-3879.

The transcript wiki for this episode is available for public editing.

Podcast #64

08-05-09 by Jeff Atwood. 43 comments

Joel and Jeff discuss the disappointment of Google AdSense, the difference in skillset between programmers and testers, and the value of standards groups to working programmers.

  • If you have feedback for Stack Exchange (still scheduled for beta by September 1st), please leave it on meta.stackoverflow.com under the Stack Exchange tag.
  • The speaker list for Stack Overflow DevDays is coming soon, it’s looking really impressive so far. For example, both John Resig (of jQuery fame) and Miguel De Icaza (of Mono fame) will be at the Boston leg, and there are still seats available! There’s also a rumor that Jeff Atwood, whoever that guy is, may show up in London.
  • We are forming a League of Justice on the web. The first new hero in our league is How-To Geek, of the most excellent How-To Geek website. It’s the editorially cultivated content yin to our user-generated yang.
  • On the crushing disappointment of Google AdSense on Stack Overflow. The theory of AdSense, matching topical ads to the content on the page, is fantastic. The reality of the type of ads we actually saw on Stack Overflow is a terrible disappointment. They were barely relevant, and often quite ugly.
  • Our hand-selected ads, targetted to our audience, perform 50 times better than AdSense. We believe that if Google could somehow tag a site with a specific audience topic (such as, say, “programmers”) it would do much better.
  • If a site like Stack Overflow, which does almost a million pageviews a day, can’t make enough to cover even one person at half time using Google AdSense, how does anyone make a living with AdSense? Does it even work?
  • Joel says the only people making decent money with AdSense are scammers who specifically build websites to do nothing except target high pay-per-click keywords. I am not sure this is what Google had in mind. It is a stunning indictment of “the power of the algorithm”.
  • Our ad partner is Alex from The Daily WTF, and we take responsible advertising seriously. The right kind of advertising, the relevant, interesting, thoughtful kind is win-win. And always in moderation. We are willing to leave money on the table to have the right kind of ads that we like editorially.
  • Joel has a great discussion about the difference in skillset between a good tester and a good programmer. “There’s something about the nature of the work that’s different enough that a lot of good developers are bored by testing, and a lot of testers are too detail-oriented to get anything done as a developer.” Some programming skills are helpful, but they’re different.
  • There is great risk in creating standards in advance — how do you know if you’re solving a problem people care about, or even the right problem in the first place? Also, the disconnect between the theory and practice can be rather painful.
  • Who can we blame for the codified misspelling of “referer”? I would like to have some words with this person.
  • We frequently use Stack Overflow to build Stack Overflow. It’s almost a recursive endeavor. If you browse the questions the team asks on Stack Overflow or Server Fault, many of them are directly related to development and deployment issues on the sites themselves!

Our favorite questions this week are both from Super User, which for now is still in semi-private beta. If you need the password it is “ewok.adventure” without the quotes.

We answered the following listener questions on this podcast:

  1. Adam: “The Fog Creek way of hiring programmers has been well documented. What about hiring testers, and how they fit into your view of how software should be built?”
  2. Kevin: “What do you see as the role of standards committees in the development community?”
  3. George: “You talked about open sourcing Stack Overflow. Why not just write a book about it?”

If you’d like to submit a question to be answered in our next episode, record an audio file (90 seconds or less) and mail it to podcast@stackoverflow.com. You can record a question using nothing but a telephone and a web browser. We also have a dedicated phone number you can call to leave audio questions at 646-826-3879.

The transcript wiki for this episode is available for public editing.