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Topic: podcasts

Podcast #74

11-18-09 by Jeff Atwood. 10 comments

Joel and Jeff sit down with Kathy Sierra and Bert Bates backstage at the Business of Software 2009 conference.

If you’d like to submit a question to be answered in our next episode, record an audio file (90 seconds or less) and mail it to podcast@stackoverflow.com. You can record a question using nothing but a telephone and a web browser. We also have a dedicated phone number you can call to leave audio questions at 646-826-3879.

The transcript wiki for this episode is available for public editing.

 

Podcast #73

11-07-09 by Jeff Atwood. 32 comments

In this episode of the Stack Overflow podcast, Joel and Jeff discuss the meaning of “professionalism” online, the divide between ad-subsidized and pay business models, and the five things everyone should hate about their favorite programming language.

  • A brief mini post-mortem of DevDays. What makes a good conference? What makes a worthwhile event for software developers?
  • Speaking of conferences, Joel and I will both be at the Business of Software conference next week in San Francisco.
  • A discussion of Robert Scoble’s article on the chat room / forum problem. Some of this stuff is counter-intuitive: you don’t actually want to be too welcoming to newbies, and you don’t actually want too much pure discussion. As Robert said, “the more conversations I got involved in the less I found I was learning.”
  • I object a little bit to people proposing social design patterns to me that are historically demonstrated not to work — or, worse, are known to be toxic. Essentially, they offer opinions without any research or even knowledge of prior research in the field.
  • We examine Joel’s latest Inc article, Does Slow Growth Equal Slow Death?. 37 Signals responded in their blog.
  • Joel and I both tried to explain our careers strategy. I think Joel’s post on careers.stackoverflow.com was clearer than my post on careers.stackoverflow.com, in that I had to post an update to mine because I failed to explain it adequately — at least based on the reader comments.
  • To the extent that careers is focusing people on “how can I be more professional online?” we heartily encourage this side-effect. Why wouldn’t you behave professionally online all the time, anyway? It is possible to have fun while being professional at the same time.
  • We posted the results of our Amazon advertising experiment. It looks like software developers are a worst-case scenario for some types of advertising. Unfortunately.
  • You can use free to undermine your competitors, but Google is going them one better — they are paying companies to use their products. It’s “less than free”. Google’s strategy is to get as many people online as possible, since more people online equals more ad clicks, statistically speaking.
  • There’s an interesting tension between the “charge for stuff” (Microsoft) and “give people ad-subsidized stuff for free” (Google) models. Having been on both sides of this now, there are definite pros and cons to both.
  • Joel and I concur: it probably doesn’t matter what language and toolchain you use, as long as it has a certain level of critical mass. What you should be more concerned about is the product you’re creating.
  • If you’re happy with your current tool chain, then there’s no reason you need to switch. However, if you can’t list five things you hate about your favorite programming language, then I argue you don’t know it well enough yet to judge. It’s good to be aware of the alternatives, and have a healthy critical eye for whatever it is you’re using.
  • Most programming languages don’t evolve particularly well over time. They’re usually replaced by other languages rather than new iterations of themselves. Why? What languages would you point to as the best example of growing and evolving in useful, relevant ways?

We answered the following listener questions on this podcast:

  1. Edward: “What fun technologies are coming up that you think employers are willing to spend money on?”
  2. Colin: “If I’m happy with PHP, why would I want to convert to ASP.NET?”

If you’d like to submit a question to be answered in our next episode, record an audio file (90 seconds or less) and mail it to podcast@stackoverflow.com. You can record a question using nothing but a telephone and a web browser. We also have a dedicated phone number you can call to leave audio questions at 646-826-3879.

The transcript wiki for this episode is available for public editing.

Podcast #72

10-30-09 by Jeff Atwood. 26 comments

Joel and Jeff sit down with Jon Skeet, software engineer at Google London, and the first Stack Overflow user to achieve 100,000 reputation.

  • A brief audio snippet of Jon’s presentation at London DevDays, featuring Tony the Pony and his sidekick.
  • A discussion of the Google London offices, which aren’t quite up to Joel’s high standards, but are quite fun in their own right. And, they do offer free unlimited Curly Wurlies! The London office mostly does mobile development, which in Google world is Android.
  • Joel explains his analogy of software development as a biology-based process, instead of a physics-based process. 
  • In Coders at Work, Peter Norvig — chief research guy at Google — explains that his definition of correctness in software now mostly involves statistics intervals, not absolute boolean “this is right”, “this is wrong” tests.
  • A brief discussion of Joel’s painful 14 line AppleScript odyssey.
  • There is a wall — literally — of hundreds of mobile phones at Google London that they use to test against. We wonder how Google’s Android will avoid devolving into the same miasma of dozens or hundreds of different versions of hardware, all of which behave differently and require special software support or workarounds.
  • Is Apple becoming to mobile apps what Microsoft was, and is, to desktop PC apps? Will success in future mobile devices require an iPhone emulation layer? Although Apple unquestionably deserves their success with the iPhone, Joel and I are deeply concerned that too much Apple dominance in this area is bad for developers, as Apple serves developers poorly.
  • Jon spends a lot of time dealing with date and time issues, and shares one particularly horrifying timezone example. Apparently, time is often ambiguous and subject to change by human processes that aren’t … entirely rational.
  • It is OK to have “fun” questions on Stack Overflow, but a) only occasionally, as we can’t have the system overrun by pure entertainment and b) the question must be legitimately programming relatd and accepted by the community. As with so many things in life, moderation is key.
  • If you’re Jon Skeet, you can post your schedule on meta and it will get 40+ upvotes. Mind you, there is no technical answer there, it’s just Jon’s schedule.
  • The daily reputation cap is partly there to encourage programmers to take a break. The goal isn’t to be on Stack Overflow, but to generally do things that make you a better programmer. While that certainly includes the fractional time slices of questions and answers that programmers so generously contribute, it also means doing your job, and writing code! To the extent that Stack Overflow itself becomes the goal, we are failing you.

Our listener question this week is from … Jon Skeet!

  • Why is the reputation cap (currently 200 points per day) time based? Would other forms of capping reputation work better or be more preferable?

Our favorite Stack Overflow question this week is:

If you’d like to submit a question to be answered in our next episode, record an audio file (90 seconds or less) and mail it to podcast@stackoverflow.com. You can record a question using nothing but a telephone and a web browser. We also have a
dedicated phone number you can call to leave audio questions at 646-826-3879.

The transcript wiki for this episode is available for public editing.

Podcast #71

10-21-09 by Jeff Atwood. 41 comments

A collection of clips recorded at the San Francisco DevDays conference, including Joel Spolsky, Mark Harrison, Jeff Atwood, Scott Hanselman and Rory Blyth. This episode runs a bit longer than usual.

  • Joel Spolsky on web usability
  • Mark Harrison on Python and the Norvig spell checker
  • Rory Blyth on iPhone development
  • Scott Hanselman on ASP.NET MVC 2.0
  • Jeff Atwood on Stack Overflow
  • Ad-hoc roundtable podcast with Scott, Rory, Joel, and Jeff backstage at DevDays. Warning: extreme ramblosity ahead!
  • Joel explains his Duct Tape Programmer post. Apparently DevDays is a duct tape conference, and this section of the recording is a duct tape podcast.
  • Some discussion of the ubiquity of mobile code. Also, if you are nostalgic for the era “when development was hard”, the consensus is that you should be doing mobile development today on iPhone, Android, Windows Mobile, or Symbian.
  • Rory elaborates on his experience with (and effusive opinions on) iPhone development to date. Is coding in Objective-C best accompanied by a flux capacitor, New Coke, and Max Headroom? Also, his excitement for MonoTouch.
  • Joel and Scott put on their amateur language designer hats and have a spirited discussion of type inference and Fog Creek’s in-house DSL, Wasabi.
  • Scott covers some of the highlights of new and shiny features coming in the Visual Studio 2010 IDE, the C# 4.0 language, and the ASP.NET MVC 2.0 web framework.

Our favorite questions this week:

If you’d like to submit a question to be answered in our next episode, record an audio file (90 seconds or less) and mail it to podcast@stackoverflow.com. You can record a question using nothing but a telephone and a web browser. We also have a dedicated phone number you can call to leave audio questions at 646-826-3879.

The transcript wiki for this episode is available for public editing.

Podcast #70

10-14-09 by Jeff Atwood. 29 comments

In this episode of the podcast, Joel and Jeff discuss DevDays, the diversity of Stack Exchange sites, the debut of CVs and careers on Stack Overflow, and the viability of WiFi at tech conferences.

  • Stack Exchange is now officially in public beta! There are a huge number of sites running on the Stack Overflow engine. Far more than I expected at this early stage, anyway.
  • The Stack Exchange sites are pushing the boundaries of the specific audience (that is, programmers) we designed it for. Consider the audience overlap between answers.onstartups.com, epicadvice.com, and moms4mom.com. I was getting usability reports from my wife on that last one, which was quite surreal. Also surreal: that Jon Skeet is a top user on one of the above. You’ll never guess which one!
  • Do some of the Stack Exchange sites compete with Stack Overflow? Such as ask.sqlteam.com and snippetgood.com? Not necessarily; if you’re particularly enthusiastic about some niche, you’ll get more questions and tighter focus of community by going to site dedicated to that topic. 
  • Joel feels that Stack Exchange works so well as a support forum that he’s shutting down all the other online FogBugz web support tools in favor of fogbugz.stackexchange.com.
  • What’s the minimum number of knowledgable, invested users you need to have a functional online Q&A community? Joel says one (!). I think it’s more on the order of a few dozen. The software part is easy, the real hurdle is this: can you rustle together a core community of a few dozen enthusiastic, knowledgable folks?
  • An extended discussion of our new careers section of Stack Overflow, which we launched last week. Joel sort of wrote the book on this topic, with Smart and Gets Things Done: Joel Spolsky’s Concise Guide to Finding the Best Technical Talent. Our careers approach grows out of Joel (and my) dissatisfaction with the current status quo. It sucks, and we’d like to build something better.
  • This is the philosophy behind careers.stackoverflow.com : smart companies should be pursuing good programmers, and not the other way around. We also want to cut out the cheesy for-pay contingency recruiters (or any other middlemen, for that matter) from the mix, and directly connect passionate programmers with companies that understand the value of programmers who hit the high notes.
  • This is Fog Creek’s guarantee for every service they charge money for: “The Fog Creek Promise: If you’re not satisfied, for any reason, within 90 days you get a full refund, period, no questions asked. We don’t want your money if you’re not amazingly happy.” Stack Overflow has adopted this promise as well. Why don’t all companies do this? Why would you want to keep an unsatisified customer’s money — it generates ill will far out of proportion to the tiny amount of money involved.
  • As a part of careers, we’re planning to roll out free, public CVs with user-selectable “vanity” URLs in a week or two. In retrospect, we should have done this from day one, as it compliments the public record of your Q&A on Stack Overflow. As Joel notes, the best way to control your online presence is to fill it yourself with all the cool stuff you’ve been doing! Don’t let others tell the story of you when you can tell it yourself.

Our favorite question this week is from Server Fault:

If you’d like to submit a question to be answered in our next episode, record an audio file (90 seconds or less) and mail it to podcast@stackoverflow.com. You can record a question using nothing but a telephone and a web browser. We also have a dedicated phone number you can call to leave audio questions at 646-826-3879.

The transcript wiki for this episode is available for public editing.