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Topic: podcasts

Podcast #61 – The “What Jay’s Done Wrong” Podcast

11-25-14 by Abby T. Miller. 13 comments

Welcome to the 61st installment of the Stack Exchange Podcast, brought to you by okra (yes, that okra). On our show today are David Fullerton, Jay Hanlon, and Joel Spolsky. It’s been a long time since we last did a podcast, so let’s get started.

  • First point of business: we have an iPad app! It’s got a snazzier feed and a fancy live preview in the Compose view. We’ve been getting more posts from mobile than we expected, because computing via iPad is the way of the future (according to Joel), so lots of features in the iOS app are now better optimized for posting as opposed to reading.
  • Moving onto far more important business: Joel’s dog Taco got 21,000 likes on Instagram.
  • PSA: Always make sure your insurance will cover it before you travel to Kansas City. (Any Kansas City. We’re not sure how many there are, or even which one Joel went to on his zombie visit.)
  • Also, Garmin makes boats.
  • By the way, we’re still talking about the iPad app, apparently. We’re collecting a lot of data about how our mobile apps are being used to help us gear them better toward the people who are actually using them. Our mobile team (led by Kasra) has been working really hard on making the apps shine (despite Joel’s efforts to force random features nobody will use onto them). So try it out (iOSAndroid) and let us know what you think. We love feedback.
  • Moving on! We revamped our Be Nice policy after hashing it out with the community on meta. (We didn’t handle the feedback part super well. Lessons were learned!) This discussion of it is about as long as the original draft was, so get comfortable.
    • A secondary point of interest: should comments stick around forever, or disappear after 21 days? I bet you can guess Joel’s opinion.
    • A tertiary point of business: the numbering of the Ten Commandments really is disputed – Joel’s not making this part up.
  • Okay that’s great. Next! Joel tries to bring up diversity (spoiler alert: we’re pro-diversity), but we decide to devote more of a podcast to it later.
  • Say, David, what is a Stack Snippet? We’re glad you asked! It’s essentially a loving knockoff of JSFiddle. They help us ensure that our content stays up-to-date and relevant, and they reduce mental friction.
  • This is cool: we open-sourced our monitoring system. It’s called “Bosun” (or “Boatswain”, or “bo’s’n”, or “the first word of The Tempest“, but we think it’s easiest to stick with Bosun). Listen about it in this podcast, read about it on the blog or the Server Fault blog, or just get started. It’s in alpha, but you can check it out. (Major credit to Matt Jibson and Kyle Brandt for their great work on this project.)
  • We have a new Q&A site about Worldbuilding, and it’s doing really well – despite the Community Team’s misgivings about launching it. We’ve shifted toward letting most Area 51 proposals test their legs in private beta – as long as they don’t embarrass us or duplicate or overlap significantly with other sites. That’s why we decided to launch Worldbuilding even though we didn’t understand it – and luckily, they proved us wrong.
  • Worldbuilding is in public beta. So is:
  • We closed down Web Design and Home Automation due to lack of activity.
  • Salesforce is fully graduated with a beautiful new design. It’s got all kinds of fonts and colors.

We’ve been going for HOURS (one hour), so it’s time to wrap it up. Thanks for listening to the Stack Exchange Podcast episode 61, brought to you by okra!

Podcast #60: Are We That Predictable?

07-16-14 by Abby T. Miller. 22 comments

Welcome to Stack Exchange Podcast episode number 60, brought to you by The National Pepperjack Cheese Council. Your hosts today are Joel Spolsky, Jay Hanlon, and David Fullerton (aka Fake Producer Abby).

Stack Exchange PodcastWe’ll jump right into things with Community Milestones, but we promise to make them quick.

  • Puzzling is now in public beta, and it’s about puzzles.
  • Data Science (DAY-ta, not DAH-ta) is in public beta, and doing better than that topic’s previous iterations.
  • Craft CMS, yet another CMS site, is now in public beta as well.
  • Buddhism is now also in – surprise! – public beta.
  • Last one: Hinduism is in public beta as well.

Whew. Time to let Uncle David walk us through about a hundred new features that have launched since our last podcast.

  • Curtail Recidivism of Q-Blocked/Suspended Accounts on Deletion. This is exactly what it sounds like (unless it sounds like nonsense). This makes it so that people who are blocked or suspended can no longer delete their accounts and create a new, non-suspended account.
  • New badges: CuriousInquisitive, and Socratic. These badges go to folks with a consistent pattern of asking good questions, which we hope will help encourage our users to ask more questions.
  • We redesigned the Stack Exchange homepage… again. (The pendulum swings.) Make it your homepage! (Or don’t.)
  • We also redesigned the Hiring page. You should come work with us!
  • And we redesigned the mobile website, which you can check out by visiting any Stack Exchange site from your mobile device (unless it’s a BlackBerry).
  • The Community Bulletin got redesigned as well.
  • Careers got a new feature, too: City Pages.

And that’s everything we’ve done for the last few months, except for the secret stuff David won’t tell us about.

It’s time for our Featured Community. This time around it’s User Experience!

It’s time to talk about quality again. Jay is hopeful, because we had a great fight about this last time. Briefly: the perceived quality on Stack Overflow has been in decline for years. And this time, we’ve got numbers and things. Our current homepage algorithm was actively highlighting unanswered questions. We did this on purpose, but that was a long time ago. The effect of that system is that unanswerable questions stay on the homepage, because the average and good ones get answered almost immediately. So it makes Stack Overflow look like a site full of bad, unanswered questions.

So here’s the new recommended tab. It’s doing two things:

  1. Not filtering out unanswered stuff.
  2. Weighting toward the tags that you’re interested in, but now with more randomness.

You see a broader distribution of stuff. It’s not perfect, and that’s why it’s a little hidden for now, but we’ll keep working on it!

The other angle we’re attacking this from is the low-quality algorithm. Or rather, the quality score algorithm. (The algorithm itself is very high quality.) We did some science and we threw a bunch of data into Vowpal Wabbit(not a typo) and built a predictor of question quality, which has given us lots of interesting information to work with. We can use hard blocks and warnings to teach people asking questions things like “add some code!” or “make sure you explain what your code is doing!”. But we don’t want to just tell people not to use certain words, because then they’re only learning not to say “thanks”, not how to write a good question. So the low quality algorithm can flag your question to be sent to a review queue before it can show up on the homepage. Probably. (This is all still up for debate.)

This is primarily a Stack Overflow thing, so Meta Stack Overflow is the best place to discuss it. Have at it!

And finally, we’ll discuss the most important meta post of all.

Thanks for listening to Stack Exchange Podcast #60, brought to you by the National Pepperjack Cheese Council! We’ll see you next time.

Podcast #59 – The Decline and Fall of Stack Overflow

05-29-14 by Abby T. Miller. 47 comments

Welcome to the 59th running of the Stack Exchange podcast, brought to you by Nutella! Your hosts Joel Spolsky, David Fullerton, and Jay Hanlon are joined this week by special guests Josh Heyer (aka Shog9) and Robert Cartaino (aka Robert Cartaino) of the Stack Exchange Community Growth team.

We’ve got a busy podcast scheduled, so let’s get down to business, starting with New Features with Uncle David.

Now we’ll come back around to Jay’s Boring Stuff, aka Community Milestones.

  • Data Science and Puzzling were in private beta at the time of this recording, and by the time we posted this, Puzzling had moved to public beta.

And now we get to switch over to our Big Meaty Topic for the day. At Stack Exchange (and particularly on Stack Overflow), we get a lot of complaints about quality declining on our sites. We split MSO and MSE, which gave people a chance to talk about their feelings (which is what we intended) and gave rise to questions like “Why is Stack Overflow so negative of late?“. It got a lot of interesting answers and comments.

Essentially, we are scaring legitimate, thoughtful people away from getting help. That’s one side of the problem. Additionally, some of our best users are getting more frustrated than we want them to be and (importantly) expressing that it’s hard for them to find questions that they want to answer. That part is something we can actually do something about.

Joel has two very very simple proposals to solve this problem.

  1. When a question gets upvoted by a user with x reputation (or maybe just upvoted), that upvote buys it y more impressions on the front page than the standard rate. Demonstrably good questions get more eyeballs than questions that haven’t been demonstrated to be good.
  2. Users that are relatively trusted by the system get more impressions on the front page for their questions. If you have a couple hundred reputation and you seem like a trusted user, your question gets more eyeballs.

Better questions get more eyeballs and therefore have a better chance of being answered well. Tune in for extensive discussion of the nuances and issues involved in Question Neutrality.

Thanks for listening to Stack Exchange Podcast #59, brought to you by Nutella!

Podcast #58 – Pack ‘Em In Like Bees

05-19-14 by Abby T. Miller. 15 comments

Welcome to Stack Exchange Podcast #58 brought to you by the Stack Exchange iOS app! Our hosts Joel Spolsky, David Fullerton, and Jay Hanlon are joined this week by our guests, the Stack Exchange Design Team: Jin Yang, Stéphane “The French Guy” Martin, Courtny Cotten, and Josh Hynes.

Let’s kick things off with Community Milestones (assuming Joel knows where he is).

New Features

  • The iPhone app is coming! [Ed: it has now been released!]
  • We’re also working on instant automagical refresh in the apps.
  • The MSO/MSE split happened! But we already talked about it.
  • We’re busy breaking Super User by trying to migrate it over to CloudFlare.
  • Coming soon… Careers 2.0 City Pages!

Community of the Week: Travel

And now we turn to our special guests! Jin Yang is the founding member of the design team. Stéphane Martin is the French guy, and he’s in the U.S. for the first time! Courtny Cotten is from Indiana, and Josh Hynes is from Pennsylvania. Those places aren’t as cool as France (apparently).

So, what does the design team do? Jin gives us his memorized elevator pitch for what Stack Exchange designers do all day. (It includes beer pong, but probably not in the way you’re thinking.) Stéphane designed the new look and feel for Academia and tells us about the process creating the look and feel for that fully graduated community. Courtny’s worked on the new Careers 2.0 city pages, and Careers search results. Josh worked on reporting, messaging for Careers, and the new user profile page on the Q&A sites. Both of them are working on new features for Careers right now. We also delve deeper into Stack Exchange design culture and history. Anecdotes! Anecdotes galore!

Thanks for listening to Stack Exchange Podcast #58, brought to you by our iOS app… and Jay’s crappy Batman drawing.

Podcast #57 – We Just Saw This On Florp

04-24-14 by Abby T. Miller. 13 comments

Welcome to Stack Exchange Podcast #57, recorded Friday April 11, 2014 with your hosts Jay Hanlon, David Fullerton, and Joel Spolsky. Today’s podcast is brought to you by the Heartbleed bug.

We have lots to talk about (which makes Joel scared), starting with Community Milestones (after we discuss 2048 strategy, that is)!

That brings us to our Community of the Week: Information Security. (For the record: horses can live in barns.) Info Security has gotten a lot of traffic lately thanks to our sponsor, the Heartbleed bug. (We wonder if we’re spelling “security” wrong for a while before we realize the site is down. So we’ll come back to this.)

Aaaanyway… let’s talk about New Features.

  1. The iOS app is going to come out in the next 6-8 weeks, but you can still sign up to test it for us if you have an iPhone.
  2. Also, we did an April Fool’s prank about unicoins.
  3. We’re making some changes to the Community Wiki system. There’s a blog post here if you’d rather fast forward through Jay’s explanation.
  4. We’re also making changes to how protecting questions works, and we’ve published a set of guidelines for how to use that feature.

That finishes the New Features segment… except for the other new features we’re going to talk about. Breaking news: we’re overhauling the profile page. (Stick with us in this part to hear Joel get bored and start talking about emo kid piercings!) There’s a very outdated mockup here.

Then, Joel gets so bored he brings up sports. On purpose. Several times. Also: this is what a Yugo looks like.

MOVING ON. The gang invents a new game, and plays it for a while. Could this be a recurring segment? Tune in next week to find out! For now, we’ve killed enough time that Info Security is back online, so we’ll talk about it for a while.

Thanks for joining us during this very productive hour of your life for Stack Exchange Podcast #57, brought to you by Heartbleed – the first buffer overflow bug with a website, a logo, and a marketing department.