site title

Topic: meta

Announcing The Launch Of Meta Stack Exchange

04-17-14 by Tim Post. 25 comments

We’re very pleased to announce that as of today, we’re (finally) splitting the site formerly known as Meta Stack Overflow into two sites:

Meta Stack Overflow is a brand-spanking new site for discussions specific to the Stack Overflow (programming) community:

 Meta Stack Overflow

Meta Stack Exchange will cover feature requests, bugs, and any discussion topics that affect the entire network:

 Meta Stack Exchange

Meta has always been one of the most important things that make our network… work. Almost all of our most important features, improvements, and community rules were partly or entirely based on our users telling us how we could help you help more people. Hell, even the idea of Meta itself came from the community – and we fought it hard before we realized how right you guys were. But meta has always had two key functions:

  1. Local governance – communities have to decide what’s on- and off- topic, what tags to use, and how to deal with topic-specific guidelines like how sources should be cited.
  2. Federal law and product feedback – Most changes to the engine affect all sites, and some guidelines and rules (“be nice”) are the same network wide.

And that’s why every site except Stack Overflow has always had its own meta site, so it could focus on the “local governance” issues that were specific to that community. But as the network has grown, many users have shown enthusiasm not just about the sites where they participate, but also about how the whole system should work. It’s time to give these discussions a place of their own.

Prior to today, Meta Stack Overflow doubled as the home of both discussions about broad network changes, and discussions around the unique issues that Stack Overflow faces (often due to its enormous scale). The percent of problems Stack Overflow shares with its smaller sister sites has become exceedingly low, which has created an awkward dissonance when it comes to how folks perceive and approach challenges.

For example, some new sites embrace the idea of highly specific, narrowly-scoped questions that seek product recommendations, – something that is perfectly acceptable to explore on many sites but completely off-limits on Stack Overflow.

Someone else might be interested in strategies to better promote and grow new sites when they come out of private beta, which might apply to many network sites, but is obviously a problem that the Stack Overflow community is not facing. The scale of Stack Overflow puts an interesting twist on almost every discussion that the Stack Overflow community has; they needed a place of their own to work on their own challenges. Similarly, someone outside of the Stack Overflow community that wants to propose a new feature isn’t likely to be super interested in XML tag synonyms.

When you visit Meta Stack Exchange, you’ll see that the split is still a a work in progress. We’re in the process of migrating quite a few Stack Overflow specific discussions that are still relevant and unresolved, to help to show the kind of topics that belong on the new MSO. Over time we’ll continue to migrate discussions that clearly belong on Meta Stack Overflow back over the fence.

If you’re interested in the nuts and bolts and mechanics of the split itself (such as how rep is going to work, moderators, etc), have a look at the initial project announcement. The plan was extremely simple, and we stuck to it.

Now, we realize that we weren’t exactly hurting for “more challenges in figuring out where to put my post”. That’s why we’re making this really simple:

When in doubt, you can always post your question on your local meta. If it’s clearly relevant to the engine or network as a whole, we’ll move it.

You can always find your local meta right under the main site in the site switcher in the upper left corner of the site:

If you have any input or ideas to share, just go right to your favorite site’s meta and do it there; there’s no need for you to go to Meta Stack Exchange at all.

That said, any time you know your question applies to the the whole network, you’re of course perfectly welcome to participate on Meta Stack Exchange directly.

The largest beneficiary of this split is probably the Stack Overflow community; our flagship site went without a town hall all of its own for way too long. Splitting the two opens up many more possibilities while alleviating noise for everyone.

Young sites don’t generally have, and may never have the sorts of challenges that Stack Overflow did. Now, there’s a place for our smaller communities to come together and figure out what works for them.

Do you have some great ideas that could make quite a few communities even better? Take them to your site’s own little town hall, or feel free to bring them to the capital city directly. Do you have ideas that suit the scale of Stack Overflow? Well then, c’mon, get meta, as it was intended.

New Per-Site Metas

07-22-10 by Jeff Atwood. 22 comments

If you’ve been following our new Stack Exchange 2.0 private and public betas, you may have noticed that every new website launches with its own dedicated meta site.

If we’ve learned anything (and I personally had to learn this lesson by having it beaten into me), it is that meta-discussion is an absolutely integral part of any healthy community. So much so, that I question whether any community without a meta site can actually survive in the wild. It’s certainly not a mistake we’re ever going to repeat again.

We tried to make these new per-site metas fairly discoverable with both a site wide notification banner of the form …

got a question about the site itself? meta.topic is the place to talk about things like what questions are appropriate, what tags we should use, etc.

… and a prominently featured link to switch between the site and the meta site at the top left of both.

(update: we’ve changed the layout a bit. The links to meta and parent are still at the top, but shifted over to the right as plain text links — the stackexchange navigation takes its place on the left. And the link to meta is now in the sidebar like so, with the top weekly meta questions — or meta questions with the special moderator-only “featured” tag.)

Click that “meta” link at the top left to go to meta (shocking, I know), and click “parent” in the same location to get back to the parent site.

However, you should know that these per-site (or “child”) metas behave significantly differently than what you might be used to on meta.stackoverflow.com, if you participated there. Based on our existing experience with Meta Stack Overflow, we tried to improve and simplify in a few ways:

  1. You never have to log in to the per-site meta. It grabs the cookie from the parent site and already “knows” who you are when you visit.
  2. Identity is always inherited from the parent site. If you have an account on the parent site, you automatically have an account on the per-site meta. Your profile can only be edited on the parent site. And of course, moderators on the parent are moderators on the per-site meta.
  3. Reputation is always inherited from the parent site. You cannot gain or lose reputation* on the per-site meta. This also means that some reputation related functions like the rep graph and bounties are not enabled on the per-site meta.
  4. You must have a minimum of 5 rep on the parent site to participate on the per-site meta. In general, the more reputation you have on the parent site, the more stake you should have in its governance. And the converse is also true: if you have no reputation on the parent site (as in 1 rep, the minumum), you haven’t even come of age to “vote” in governance issues, so to speak. We also expect that most established users will have the +100 network account association bonus, so they won’t be affected.
  5. Voting up or down does not affect reputation. You are now free to vote purely based on post content, without worrying about how your vote might positively or negatively affect someone’s reputation score.

* however, there is one exception: extreme misbehavior on the meta site will affect your parent site reputation. And not in, shall we say, the “good” way.

In fact, we’re so happy with the way these per-site metas are working on the Stack Exchange 2.0 sites, we’re extending the per-site metas to Super User and Server Fault as of right now!

meta.superuser.com


meta.serverfault.com

For now we are leaving meta.stackoverflow.com grandfathered in, as-is, with no changes; it’s still a standalone community with a standalone reputation system. We think Stack Overflow is large enough to justify this, and it just so happens that Stack Overflow is also the name of the company, too. Meta Stack Overflow will serve as the “National Capital” where we process feedback not just for Stack Overflow but for the core engine itself — while the smaller meta sites are akin to regional or state capitals. So, in a nutshell:

  • meta.stackoverflow.com is Washington, DC
  • meta.serverfault.com is Columbus, OH
  • meta.superuser.com is Sacramento, CA
  • meta.cooking.stackexchange.com is Atlanta, GA
  • meta.gadgets.stackexchange.com is Denver, CO
  • meta.webmasters.stackexchange.com is Boston, MA

… and so forth.

But it is the exception. The per-site meta is a standard fixture of our network now, because it’s how you, as a community, will own the design and governance of your site.

The 7 Essential Meta Questions of Every Beta

07-09-10 by Robert Cartaino. 10 comments

Groups have an amazing ability to self organize — not by following rules or hierarchies of authority, but through basic human nature. Have you ever found yourself in the middle of a spontaneous brainstorming session with a group of colleagues? Sometimes you just know that you’re at the start of something big — something important — when everyone is abuzz with ideas, collaborating wildly with enthusiasm and energy.

That’s how it feels each time a new Stack Exchange site is launched. Not only in the questions and answers that are posted, but in the back room collaborations where the self-governance is starting to take shape — in meta.

Every new Stack Exchange site — not some of them, but all of them — gets their own dedicated meta site.

This is a “child site” set aside for discussing issues concerning all the behind-the-scenes intricacies of running the main site. But we provide very little guidance about how each new Stack Exchange community will make their site work for them. Each community starts with a blank slate: a meta site with no content and little guidance about what to do with it.

Yet, with every new site to date, members didn’t wait on us. Those who were interested in community building, pitched in to set up the governance for their sites: getting to work on a site name and design, deciding issues of moderation and site policy, and discussing how the community will police themselves.

I applaud their initiative.

Take Ownership of Your Community

Each community has to own the design and governance of their site. They can’t always expect us to show up and say, “Hey guys, which logo do you like?” Each community should work out how they’re going to come up with a logo on their own. But self governance is more about figuring out organically how all the tasks of defining and maintaining a community are going to get accomplished.

Meta is your opportunity to take control; to take ownership of your site; to become self governing. It is your Constitutional Convention.

Philadelphia Constitutional Convention

Having said that, one of the benefits of being part of a larger network is eliciting cooperation and  learning from other communities. Rather than letting future sites stumble their way through the same issues over and over again, I have compiled a list of the questions you should consider fundamental to a successful beta.

The 7 Essential Questions of Every Beta

Your meta site should be buzzing with activity. There are a lot of issues to be worked out. Take it upon yourself to ask these questions early in the beta period. The answers will have a lasting effect on how your site operates for a very long time.

1. Are questions about [subject] on or off topic?

The single most important design element of a new Q&A site is the questions on the front page. They become the de facto definition of the site, trumping anything defined in Area 51 or the Help Center.

You should actively watch the earliest questions with an eye for quality and purpose. Ask yourself: “Is this the type of question we want on this site? Is it pushing the boundaries of on- and off-topic questions? Are we opening a can of worms?” Talk about these issues in meta, early and often. They are the key to establishing the boundaries around your site.

2. What should our documentation contain?

Much of the site’s documentation will be the same as on every other Stack Exchange site: “be nice,” “how to create an account,” “how to ask questions” — it’s all pretty static. Even the sections about “what kind of questions should I (not) ask here?” comes primarily from the Definition phase of Area 51.

But the questions you want to discuss in meta are those issues specific to your site that need to be mentioned in the Help Center.

Take Super User’s “About” page as an example:

Super User is for computer enthusiasts and power users.

Ask about…

  • Specific issues with computer software, hardware or networking
  • Real problems or questions that you’ve encountered

Don’t ask about…

  • Anything not directly related to computer software or computer hardware
  • Questions that are primarily opinion-based
  • Questions with too many possible answers or require an extremely long answer
  • Videogames, consoles, or other electronic devices, unless they connect to your computer
  • Websites or web services like Google, Facebook, Twitter, and WordPress
  • Shopping, buying or product recommendations
  • Issues specific to corporate IT support and networks

These are then elaborated on in SU’s What topics can I ask about here? page.

It took us almost a year to figure out the list of “we want these sort of questions” and “we don’t want these sort of questions” on Super User. Area 51 gave you a head start but you should also be working out other scope- and documentation-related issues specific to your topic and your community.

3. How should we tag questions about {subject}?

Tagging questions is an ad hoc way of organizing content. It is mostly improvised by users asking the questions… but only to a point. Tag auto-completion and community editing will influence the proper use of tags for a very long time.

The type of things you should look out for: how to handle acronyms common to your subject, brand versus product-specific tags, common terminology, and the use of semantic tags to categorize specific types of questions unique to your community. Every site will have their own unique set of tag-related issues.

The best way to identify tagging problems is to watch new posts closely, and try to build tag wiki excerpts that explain what the tags are for. When tags become ambiguous, too specific (or not specific enough), or just somehow off, raise those issues in meta, and quickly. Proper tagging is very much a lead-by-example activity. The sooner you get the “community standards” for tagging ironed out, the less chance you’ll have to face the drudgery of cleaning them up later.

4. Who should the moderators be?

The issue of holding fair elections is largely technical. The long-term solution will likely come from us. Still, bring up these issues in meta. There is a lot of room for innovation. Discussing the criteria of a great moderator is important and picking out potential candidates is a great way to introduce outstanding contributors to your community. And we are completely open to appointing temporary Moderators when someone’s contribution makes them a standout choice for your community’s human exception handler.

For more detail see: Moderator Pro Tempore and Stack Exchange Moderator Elections Begin

5. What’s the “elevator pitch” for our site?

Imagine you’ve just gotten on an elevator with a friendly stranger. You have precisely one floor to describe your community to them. What would you say? The elevator pitch is a brief sentence that describes what your site is about. Every word counts!

Once decided, it can be sliced and diced to form:

  • the tagline
  • the motto
  • the blurb under the logo
  • a convenience redirect “nickname” for the site
  • perhaps eventually the domain name in some form

(Due to a variety of practical difficulties with domain names, we prefer to de-emphasize domain name selection. Most sites will retain their topic.stackexchange.com names indefinitely.)

Naming is hard — really hard. But if you can come up with a sensible elevator pitch for your community, it’s a great starting point.

For more detail see: Stack Exchange Naming for Dummies

6. What should our logo and site design look like?

This one is pretty straightforward. Solicit contributions, throw out ideas, post preliminary (or finished) designs, and be supportive and respectful of other people’s ideas and creativity.

We have designers on staff who will actively help come up with site designs but, if an idea stemming from the community stands out as exceptional, we are happy to use it.

7. How do we promote our site?

This is rapidly becoming a hot issue across the entire network: how to promote your site and how to reach out to the experts and peers in your industry. We can come up with budgets and promotions but the means and ideas about how to reach your target audience HAS TO come from you and your community. Has to. Has to, has to, has to! We simply are not experts in your field. We don’t have the the connections nor the experience you bring to the table. You are both our evangelist and our ambassador — and sharing links to great questions and answers is the best way to start.

Stack Overflow has been a huge, red-hot success story in the programming arena. But that early success came in large part to the participation of Jeff Atwood and Joel Spolsky, both cult-classic bloggers and celebrities in their field. We want that same success for you and your community. That’s why we need to identify the Jeffs and the Joels of your industry. We need bloggers, pundits, podcasters, publishers, celebrities… anyone who can rally the troops, so to speak.

Meta is the perfect venue reach out and ask around about who knows whom. Ask your friends to ask their friends. The people needed to make your site a huge success are already within your reach.

For more detail see: A Recipe to Promote Your Site

C’Mon Get Meta!

06-28-09 by Jeff Atwood. 41 comments

What’s the first rule of Stack Overflow Club?

You don’t talk about Stack Overflow on Stack Overflow.

fight-club-soap

We have this policy not because we are jerks (or at least, not just because we are jerks) but because we believe meta-discussion kind of gets in the way. As the faq explains:

Also, try to refrain from asking questions about Stack Overflow itself unless you absolutely, positively have to. Most programmers don’t come here to learn about the intricacies of Stack Overflow; they come here to get answers to their programming questions. Let’s try to help them out by not cluttering up the system with navelgazing meta-discussion. If you want to suggest a feature or discuss how Stack Overflow works, visit our UserVoice site.

Despite this rule, the desire for an “official” meta-discussion site has been strong. Lots of community members want to discuss Stack Overflow itself, the community as a whole, how it works, topics on the blog, the website, and so forth. It’s come up many times on UserVoice, and is currently the #3 ranked UserVoice request:

I know this has been declined multiple times, but I really think it’s time to consider the problem of meta-discussions on the site. To understand why something else is needed, let’s look at what doesn’t work:

  • Meta-questions? Closed moments after they are asked rendering them useless.
  • Meta-answers? Assuming a question is available to attach to, these questions clutter up the answer stream.
  • Comments? word and formatting limitations prevent any meaningful discussion.
  • Third-party site? Unlikely to be seen by a critical mass of users to be worthwhile.

The current system completely cuts off meta-conversations to the detriment of the SO community.

The desire for meta-discussion is so fervent that some enterprising members of the SO community got sick and tired of waiting for us to listen to them and set up their own meta-discussion site. I applaud this initiative. Good programmers get off their butts!

They have the right idea: create a seperate area for meta-discussion. That way, everyone wins: people who are interested in community building can pitch in together, and the vast hordes of programmers who just want some freakin’ answers to their questions don’t have to wade through a lot of extra noise to get there.

That said, the limitations of phpBB (and their ilk) are fairly painful, and felt like stepping back 10 years in time compared to the Stack Overflow engine. So instead of an unofficial, old-and-busted forum, how about an official meta-discussion outlet based on the Stack Overflow engine you’ve come to know and love?

meta.stackoverflow.com

We’re a little unsure how well the current SO engine will map to discussion-y topics. Remember, we designed explicitly around Questions and Answers — specifically, questions around a theme that can be (mostly) answered! Launching our own internal meta-discussion site is one way of finding out.

I’ve made Kyle Cronin and Tom Ritter moderators on the meta.* site, as they already went to such great lengths to create their own community sites around Stack Overflow. I think they’ve earned it.

It’s also looking more and more like meta will replace our UserVoice site, so our adjunct UserVoice moderators, Joel Coehoorn and Sean Massa, will of course be invited to moderate meta.stackoverflow.com as well.

Kyle had some ideas about changes to the SO engine to help it adapt from the Q&A format discussion:

  • bounties make little sense on a discussion site
  • wording needs to be tweaked (i.e. questions->topics, answers->replies)
  • need to be able to follow questions/get notices of additional replies
  • remove notion of community wiki, as discussion sites have a stronger sense of ownership, plus nothing will be off-topic
  • ensure that chronological ordering is the default, if not the only, sort order, both for replies and comments
  • remove accepting an answer
  • some of the close reasons will have to be removed or tweaked

We’ve made a few of the easier changes already that were based on (groan) meta-data. Others will be tougher. We won’t know until we try, so …

C’mon get meta!

… and see what happens.