site title

Topic: legal

Defending Attribution Required

08-11-10 by Jeff Atwood. 21 comments

All content contributed to the Stack Exchange network is licensed under cc-wiki (aka cc-by-sa).

What does this mean? In short, it’s a way of guaranteeing that we can’t ever do anything nefarious with the questions and answers the community have so generously shared with us. It’s not unheard of for some companies to arbitrarily decide that giving content back to the community is, er … well, let’s just say … not in their best commercial interests. Then they suddenly pull the rug out from under the very people that contributed the content that made them viable in the first place.

We wouldn’t want that done to us. And there’s no way we’re doing it to our community. To prove it, we adopted a licensing scheme that makes it impossible for us to do anything even partially-quasi-evil with our community’s content. Namely, cc-by-sa (aka cc-wiki), which gives everyone the following rights to all Stack Exchange data:

You are free:

  • to Share— to copy, distribute and transmit the work
  • to Remix — to adapt the work

Under the following conditions:

  • Attribution — You must attribute the work in the manner specified by the author or licensor(but not in any way that suggests that they endorse you or your use of the work).
  • Share Alike — If you alter, transform, or build upon this work, you may distribute the resulting work only under the same or similar license to this one.

This isn’t news, of course; it’s explained on the footer of every web page we serve. And note that we explicitly allow commercial usage — after all, we’re a commercial entity, so it felt only sporting to allow others the same rights we enjoyed.

What is news, is this: lately we’re getting a lot of reports of sites reposting our content (which is totally cool, and explicitly allowed), but not attributing it correctly … which is most decidedly not cool.

What are our attribution requirements?

Let me clarify what we mean by attribution. If you republish this content, we require that you:

  1. Visually indicate that the content is from Stack Overflow, Meta Stack Overflow, Server Fault, or Super Userin some way. It doesn’t have to be obnoxious; a discreet text blurb is fine.
  2. Hyperlink directly to the original questionon the source site (e.g., http://stackoverflow.com/questions/12345)
  3. Show the author namesfor every question and answer
  4. Hyperlink each author name directly back to their user profile page on the source site (e.g., http://stackoverflow.com/users/12345/username)

By “directly”, I mean each hyperlink must point directly to our domain in standard HTML visible even with JavaScript disabled, and not use a tinyurl or any other form of obfuscation or redirection. Furthermore, the links must not be nofollowed.

They’re not complicated, nor are these attribution requirements particularly hard to find: they’re linked from the footer of every web page we serve, and included as a plaintext file in every public data dump we share.

We’ve been collecting a list of sites that are reposting our data without attributing it correctly — but it’s becoming something of an epidemic lately. Every other day now I get an email or meta report about a real live web search where someone found content that is clearly ripped off, has zero useful attribution, and a bucket of greasy, slimy ads slathered all over it to boot.

I’m starting to get fed up with these sites. Not because they’re abusing our website, but because they’re abusing you guys, our community — by reposting your questions and your answers with no attribution! The whole point of Stack Overflow, Server Fault, Super User, and every other Stack Exchange site is to give credit directly to the talented people providing all these fantastic answers. When a scraper site rips a great answer, removes all attribution and context, plasters it with cheap ads — and it shows up in a public web search result, as they increasingly do — everyone loses.

I’m not going to stand for this, at least not without a fight. We’re starting to email these sites and ask them very politely to please follow our simple attribution guidelines.

And if they don’t follow our simple attribution requirements when we’ve asked them nicely, well — we’re going to start asking them not so nicely. Namely, we will hit them where it hurts, in the pocketbook. Our pal How-to-Geek explains:

For the quickest results, you can send the DMCA to their web host, which you can generally figure out with whoishostingthis.com. Every single legit hosting center will have a “legal” or “copyright” page, and they will have a specific way to send in DMCA requests. Some of them require fax, though many are starting to accept email instead… and they will often have the content removed almost instantly. WordPress.com will instantly cancel their entire account, and other hosts tend to take very swift action, often disabling their whole site until they comply.

If you really want to cause them some pain, however, you can send the DMCA to their advertisers. Adsense is usually the first target for this, since so many of the jerks are using it. The only problem with Adsense is they require a DMCA fax.

There’s been once or twice where I’ve found a site that was hosted somewhere that doesn’t care about copyright… but every single ad network of any value is based in the US, and the jerk website owner isn’t going to mess around with their income stream.

Please help us defend your right to have your name and source attached to the content you’ve so generously contributed to our sites. We will absolutely do our part, but many hands make light work:

  1. Whenever you find a new site that is using our data without proper attribution, check this meta question and make sure it’s listed.
  2. If you have contact information for the site that is inappropriately using our content, forward it to us at [email protected] for action.
  3. If you’re feeling a bit miffed about the whole situation, don’t hesitate to forward a link to our attribution guidelines to the site operators, or their ISP, and briefly indicate specifically where they are not following them. Squeaky wheel gets the grease, and all that.
  4. If the site is wrapping the content in invasive ads that attempt to redirect the user or compromise their web experience in some way, I encourage you to report it at http://www.google.com/safebrowsing/report_badware/ ; I’m only adding this because it happened recently (!).

I’m always happy for our content to get remixed and reused, but at some point we have to start defending our attribution guidelines, or we are failing the community who trusted us with their content in the first place.

After all, if we don’t stick up for what’s right, and what’s fair — who will?

 

Guidelines for Use of our Logo and Name

06-08-10 by Jeff Atwood. 9 comments

Since the Stack Exchange API went into public beta, and we started our totally awesome API contest, we’ve run into a bit of self-inflicted confusion:

How can I use the Stack Overflow | Server Fault | Super User name and logo in my application?

While we had a general “we know proper usage when we see it” idea about this, we didn’t have a document describing the specific do’s and don’ts. But now we do!

Guidelines for the Use of the Stack Exchange Trademarks

(also available by clicking the legal link in the footer of any network site page)

While this is the most urgently needed info we didn’t have, we also took the opportunity to improve a few other legal documents for the brave new world of Stack Exchange 2.0:

We tried our best to avoid legalese in these documents:

Legalese is an English term first used in 1914 for legal writing that is designed to be difficult for laymen to read and understand, the implication being that this abstruseness is deliberate for excluding the legally untrained and to justify high fees. Legalese, as a term, has been adopted in other languages. Legalese is characterized by long sentences, many modifying clauses, complex vocabulary, high abstraction, and insensitivity to the layman’s need to understand the document’s gist. Legalese arises most commonly in legal drafting, yet appears in both types of legal analysis. Today, the Plain Language Movement in legal writing is progressing and experts are busy trying to demystify legalese.

If you’re unfamiliar, the legalese hall of shame is a great reminder of what we’re striving to avoid here.

Please review these documents and let us know if they are reasonably clear, and answer your main questions, particularly concerning usage of our logos, domains, and names in your own applications.

While you can always comment here on the blog as usual, I opened a meta topic if you have any specific, actionable feedback you’d like us to follow up on.

Attribution Required

06-25-09 by Jeff Atwood. 35 comments

All the content contributed to Stack Overflow or other Stack Exchange sites is cc-wiki (aka cc-by-sa) licensed, intended to be shared and remixed. We even provide all our data as a convenient data dump, seeded by us.

But our cc-wiki licensing, while intentionally permissive, does require attribution.

Attribution — You must attribute the work in the manner specified by the author or licensor (but not in any way that suggests that they endorse you or your use of the work).

I thought it was pretty clear what “attribution” meant, but given the semi-scammy way the content is popping up in some seedier areas of the internet, maybe not:

  • http://hiveminds.se/vote/framed/story.php?id=23472
  • http://programmingfaq.w3ec.com/

(there may be others; these are just the ones I know about)

So let me clarify what we mean by attribution. If you republish this content, we require that you:

  1. Visually indicate that the content is from Stack Overflow or the Stack Exchange network in some way. It doesn’t have to be obnoxious; a discreet text blurb is fine.
  2. Hyperlink directly to the original question on the source site (e.g., http://stackoverflow.com/questions/12345)
  3. Show the author names for every question and answer
  4. Hyperlink each author name directly back to their user profile page on the source site (e.g., http://stackoverflow.com/users/12345/username)

By “directly”, I mean each hyperlink must point directly to our domain in standard HTML visible even with JavaScript disabled, and not use a tinyurl or any other form of obfuscation or redirection. Furthermore, the links must not be nofollowed.

This is about the spirit of fair attribution. Attribution to the website, and more importantly, to the individuals who so generously contributed their time to create that content in the first place!

Anyway, I hope that clears up any confusion — feel free to remix and reuse to your heart’s content, as long as a good faith effort is made to attribute the content!

Stack Overflow Creative Commons Data Dump

06-04-09 by Jeff Atwood. 94 comments

We decided early on that all user-generated content on Stack Overflow would be under a Creative Commons license.

All those great Stack Overflow questions, answers, and comments, so generously contributed by all of you, are licensed under cc-wiki (also known as cc-by-sa):

cc-wiki-logo

cc-wiki license

You are free

  • to Share — to copy, distribute, and transmit the work
  • to Remix — to adapt the work

Under the following conditions

  • Attribution — You must attribute the work in the manner specified by the author or licensor (but not in any way that suggests that they endorse you or your use of the work).
  • Share Alike — If you alter, transform, or build upon this work, you may distribute the resulting work only under the same or similar license to this one.

The community has selflessly provided all this content in the spirit of sharing and helping each other. In that very same spirit, we are happy to return the favor by providing a database dump of public data.

We always intended to give the contributed content back to the community as a whole. Our primary concern was making sure we didn’t have an AOL-style “incident” where we accidentally release personally identifying information in so-called “sanitized” data. Stack Overflow user Greg Hewgill was kind enough to help us beta test several iterations of the data dump, ensuring that we didn’t release anything except content that is visible on the public website. He also suggested several improvements to improve the data dump, so that it contains as much useful public information as possible.

profile for Greg Hewgill at Stack Overflow, Q&A for professional and enthusiast programmers

Cheers, Greg! Also, thanks to Stack Overflow Valued Associate #00003, Geoff Dalgas, who patiently worked through many iterations of this to get it together on our end.

All public Stack Exchange sites are now included in the data dump: including Stack Overflow, Server Fault, Super User, and so on.

Locate and Download the Latest Stack Overflow Creative Commons Data Dump

Note that if you republish this data, we require attribution as described in this blog post. Most importantly, there should be hyperlinks back to the original question, and the profiles of all participants.

Our plan is to create a new data dump every two months, reflecting all data in the system up to that date. We will seed the latest and greatest dump (at a low bitrate) as long as we can, ideally permanently.

And yes, it’s still fun to say “data dump”. We look forward to seeing what the community can do with this data!

update: per this message from Cameron Parkins of Creative Commons, cc-wiki is now an alias for cc-by-sa.

Hi Stack Overflow-ers,

My name is Cameron Parkins – I do community outreach at Creative Commons and recently stumbled across your latest CC data dump.

Very cool that you all are using CC! I wanted to give you a heads up that the license you’ve chosen, the “CC Wiki-License”, isn’t really around any more. It is in the sense that it links directly to our CC BY-SA license, but our attempt to brand it as a separate license for wikis never got off the ground. We don’t use or promote it anymore and when we see it, we try and reach out to whoever is using it to let them know.

Part of the problem is that the Wiki License doesn’t carry any value, while our BY-SA license (which is what the wiki license is) has widespread community support around it. Would you all consider switching your indication as such?

Let me know if you have any questions – would like to promote the project through our networks.

Best,
C


Cameron Parkins
Cultural Program Assistant
Creative Commons

[aim] cam3ran
[work] www.creativecommons.org
[linkedin] http://www.linkedin.com/in/cameronparkins
[cc newsletter] http://creativecommons.org/about/newsletter

Stack Overflow and BizSpark

03-14-09 by Jeff Atwood. 23 comments

Stack Overflow is language and platform agnostic by design. We feel that building cool stuff is way more important the brand of screwdriver you used to build it. Argue all you want about which brand of screwdriver is better, but what really matters is the end result — what you’ve actually built with your screwdriver of choice.

screwdrivers

That said, we’ve been very open about the fact that Stack Overflow runs on a Microsoft development stack.

It’s OK to be proud of your stack if you aren’t a jerk or a bigot about it. We chose the Microsoft stack because we knew it intimately, and we all had years of development experience under our belts. We were also very much enamored of the ASP.NET MVC style of building websites, and IIS7. The .NET framework is quite fast and mature by now, with a nice 64-bit top to bottom toolchain supporting it. In short, we love our stack!

One downside of a Microsoft stack for a young, poor startup (have I mentioned that Stack Overflow was mostly funded out of my pocket?) is that, unlike the open source world, you have to pay for software licenses. This isn’t a big deal for the mega corporations that seem to make up most of Microsoft’s revenue. What’s a hundred thousand dollars in licensing fees when you have millions in income? Relative to how much it costs to pay human beings to do the work, it’s almost nothing. Startups, however, are running not so much on money, but on moxie.

moxie

Moxie is an essential ingredient in any startup, but it is sadly not legal tender for purchasing software licenses.

And Microsoft software licenses aren’t cheap, particularly the Windows Server licenses, and especially the SQL Server licenses, which are absolutely eye-poppingly expensive (think $10k and up). This is where Microsoft’s BizSpark program comes in:

bizspark-logo

  • No fees to join (though you do need a “network sponsor”)
  • Access to as many production Microsoft product licenses as you need, for free, for three years
  • MSDN Professional full access subscription to download the software

This is good for three years. At the end of that three year period:

  1. you have to pay $100
  2. you have to license the software you’re actually using

Basically, it’s a gamble that some startups will transform into successful businesses in a few years, businesses that don’t care when they have to spend less than 1% of their income on software licensing fees.

I don’t think BizSpark will magically turn startups who hate closed-source software into Steve Ballmer fans overnight. However, it’s a pretty nice option for developers who have skills in Microsoft development tools and are looking at running a lean, mean startup with legal licenses. The options before BizSpark were pretty dismal — Piracy? Grey market licenses? Co-opted MSDN keys?

Stack Overflow has been enrolled in BizSpark for a while now. Eligibility requirements are as follows:

  • In the business of software development
  • Privately held
  • In business for less than 3 years
  • Less than US $1 million in annual revenue

This isn’t a silver bullet that will magically close the chasm between open source and closed source toolsets. But it’s clearly a step in the right direction. I almost wish Microsoft had launched BizSpark five or ten years ago.

If you’d like to get started, check the BizSpark website. They also have a Twitter account which highlights some of the other startups involved, and includes this essential advice:

Bizspark friends please RT: if you need a invitation code to join Bizspark, just email [email protected], we will sign you up !

Given the weird “network partner” requirement, I’d give that a shot if this is at all a fit. What do you have to lose, other than all your open source street credibility?