site title

Topic: design

Editing is essential: new badges and review enhancements

10-07-14 by Shog9. 35 comments

Explainer - Edited and answered 1 question (both actions within 12 hours, answer score > 0)
Refiner - Edited and answered 50 questions (both actions within 12 hours, answer score > 0)
Illuminator - Edited and answered 500 questions (both actions within 12 hours, answer score > 0)

We rolled out three new badges last week!

These recognize a pattern that sets Stack Exchange apart from the forums and message boards that came before it: answering and editing questions, the ability to not only write an answer that can be useful beyond the immediate asker but also re-write the question such that it can be found and understood by future readers. Thanks to this capability, brilliant explanations need not languish under titles such as “C++ problem” or “Java doubt” – having written an answer that ably fixed the problems in the asker’s code, it is possible to also fix the problems in his writing!

It’s no surprise then that the top editors tend to include an awful lot of the top answerers. If you’re good at writing, good enough to consistently hammer out insightful answers, you’d be a fool not to make sure the introductions to those answers – the questions being answered – were of similar quality. Yet, this seemingly-obvious technique remains unknown to many – indeed, I’ve heard some express shock at the notion that answerers would be allowed to touch the words of those whose questions they strive to interpret and address.

Well, you are allowed. And now, encouraged!

As with previous sets of badges, the bronze level exists to provide a form of “just in time” learning for new users, while the silver and gold levels offer increasingly lofty goals to strive for.

Recent changes to suggested edits

With the introduction of suggested edits, we sought to make the immense power of editing available to anyone reading the site. Instead of going into effect immediately, suggested edits required approval from some number of people who had already earned full editing privileges, thus ensuring some resistance to spammers, vandals and griefers as well as a path by which inexperienced editors could be guided by those with more exposure to community norms. However, several serious deficiencies in this system became apparent over the past few years, so we’ve now taken steps to correct them:

  1. We’re now notifying editors of past rejections when they load the edit form.

    There are some checks in place to avoid hassling folks with occasional rejections, but for a new editor whose edits are being rejected these should help them to improve before they waste too much of their time.
  2. Reviewers are given a limited period of exclusivity for edits they’re reviewing, during which the edit won’t be assigned to anyone else for review. This should greatly reduce the frustration for conscientious reviewers, who might previously find the edit they were reviewing (or improving) already approved or rejected by the time they submitted their review.
  3. Reviewers who wish to perform edits themselves have the option of either approving and editing on top of the suggestion, or rejecting and replacing it with a different edit.

    This replaces both the previous “Improve” option, and the “too minor” rejection reason, allowing edits that make small changes while overlooking large flaws to be quickly discarded, while ensuring that truly helpful edits – even small ones – are more consistently approved. Combined with change #2, this gives a great deal more power to reviewers who are comfortable editing – and who better to review edits than editors?
  4. Finally, we’ve revamped the rest of the predefined suggested edit rejection reasons, improving their context-sensitivity and focusing more specifically on common mistakes and outright abuse.

Together, these changes should offer better guidance to both editors and reviewers, helping both work together effectively.


Big thanks to everyone who chimed in on the meta discussions linked above, as well as those who’ve repeatedly reported these problems over the past few years. Gratitude is also due to the developers who patiently worked to implement these changes, Geoff Dalgas (badges, review changes) and Kevin Montrose (edit rejection feedback). And of course, huge thanks to everyone who uses this tooling in spite of the occasional rough edges.

These changes are part of a project intended to help improve the quality of Q&A on Stack Exchange. Stay tuned for even bigger, better changes in the coming months!

Your communities list is now customizable

03-03-14 by Jeremy Tunnell. 22 comments

A few months ago, we rolled out a new top bar for all of the Stack Exchange communities. The mission was consistency: Every community gets the same Stack Exchange brand at the top, the same navigation between sites, and the same live updates about new inbox items and reputation changes

But we realize that not everybody uses Stack Exchange the same way. Some people focus on one community, others participate in several, and more than a few spend a lot of time lurking now that we have 116 different sites to choose from.

That’s why, as promised, we have made the “Your communities” section of the Stack Exchange drop-down fully customizable so you can keep all of your favorite communities right at the top.

Edit link

Here’s how it works:

Customizing this list is completely optional. If you do nothing, you will keep the defaults: your top five communities by reputation.

Edit mode

But click the edit button and the default rules no longer apply. Instead, you can:

  1. Add a community to the list by typing the name and clicking Add
  2. Repeat #1 to add as many as you want
  3. Change the order of communities in the list by clicking and dragging
  4. Click the Save button to apply your changes!


You can reset the list to the default at any time, so try it out! Then drop by the Meta post to share your thoughts and feedback.

 

A New Top Bar for Stack Exchange

12-04-13 by David Fullerton. 225 comments

The top bar of a Stack Exchange site has always been a bit of an odd place. It somehow combines user info, navigation, search, and a one-size-fits-all popup that includes hot network questions, a list of 100+ Stack Exchange sites, personal inbox messages, and other system notifications (lovingly referred to as The StackExchange™ MultiCollider SuperDropdown™).

It was, in retrospect, overdue for a face-lift which is why we’re excited to roll out a new top bar this week.

A Bigger, Blacker Bar

The first thing you’ll notice is that it’s really black*. When we originally conceived of the top bar with the Stack Exchange logo (way back in Ye Olde 2010), one of the main goals was to mark each site as a Gen-u-wine™ Stack Exchange site. Since then, however, we’ve created unique designs for over 40 different sites, and the Stack Exchange logo has started to get a bit… lost.

So, in the redesigned top bar, we wanted to make sure that it would look the same across all sites, and make it obvious that you’re on a Stack Exchange site. It turns out that when you try to pick a color to match 40 different site designs, you quickly realize you only have one real choice: black.

* Jin points out that technically it’s not quite black: it’s #212121.

New Achievements popup

The biggest addition to the top bar is the brand new Achievements popup. Previously, if you wanted to know your reputation on every site you were active on, you had to visit every one of those sites. This led to some of us, well, compulsively cycling through sites and refreshing to see if we’d gained any rep. Now, there’s one convenient place to check from whatever site you happen to be on:

This new popup includes:

  • A reputation counter at the top which sums all reputation you’ve gained on all sites since the last time you checked, updated in real-time
  • Entries for reputation, badge, and privilege notifications, grouped by post and time
  • A summary of reputation gained today
  • Aggregation from every site in the network in one place

This should make it much easier to keep track of your reputation and badges across all the sites that you are active on.

New Sites List (aka “The Site Switcher”)

The old list of sites has gotten a new layout and is now its own distinct popup. The idea is to make it easy to switch between sites if you participate on several, or to find a new site that you don’t participate on regularly:

In the new “Site Switcher” you’ll find:

  • The current site at the top, with meta, chat, and blog links for the current site (and Stack Overflow Careers when on Stack Overflow)
  • A list of your top 5 sites, ordered by reputation*, with your reputation for each
  • A searchable list of all sites, with a short description of each

* We’ll probably let you customize this list in the near future, so you can include sites you like to watch but don’t have much reputation on.

New Global Inbox

The Global Inbox has been split out into its own popup as well, instead of a subsection of the Stack Exchange popup:

We’ve gotten rid of the confusing distinction between “inbox” and “notifications”. All messages will now appear in the inbox, except for reputation and badge events which are in the new Achievements popup. Inbox items also now have a new layout, which should be easier to scan.

Feedback Welcome

There are a few smaller changes to mention as well:

  • Your name has been replaced with your picture, to make it easier to recognize at a glance that you’re signed in as you (and because some longer names just don’t fit).
  • The help link is now a dropdown with links to the tour and the help center, with a short explanation of what each is.
  • Click areas for everything are now the full-size of the row, to make them easier to click or tap on mobile.
  • The hot network questions have moved to the sidebar on the homepage, since they aren’t really navigation or notifications.

The new top bar will be rolling out network-wide, including Area 51 and stackexchange.com, in the next few weeks. As always, meta is the place to go for feedback, suggestions, and bug reports.

The New Stack Exchange Beta Theme

03-06-12 by Robert Cartaino. 20 comments

I wanted to give you a quick look at the new Stack Exchange Beta theme. Yes, we are retiring the familiar “Sketchy” theme and rolling out a more-polished and finished design for the beta sites.

Raise the curtain, cue the trumpet fanfare…

Alas, poor Sketchy…

Over the course of the next few weeks, we will be rolling out the new Stack Exchange Beta theme to all the sites still in beta.

At first glance, the new beta theme looks like an unembellished version of any graduated site: Finished, but without any particular “beta” theme, per se. But that’s sort of the point.

The crux of this change is that it’s high time we stopped equating beta sites with being somehow unfinished. Sure, in their earliest days — when a community is defining their scope, building a FAQ, and finding its community leaders — a site might be considered unfinished (i.e. “under construction”). But once you are past those earliest wild-west days of figuring out why your site exists, a site should no longer be considered unfinished. Right out of the gate, the Stack Exchange engines gives you a world-class Q&A suite worth recommending on its own merits. If you’ve been holding back, go ahead; share, promote, and enjoy!

There was a time when we thought the average beta period would last, oh… about 90 days. The site would begin and build up enough content and users to reach critical mass. Reaching that tipping point of unstoppable growth defines “graduation.” But getting to that point is hard work, and it usually take longer than 90 days… much longer. So we’re left with this big gap between the time when a site is truly “under construction” to when it finally reaches graduation and gets its own custom design.

In the meantime, holding onto that unfinished-site meme has become actively harmful to community building, and an unproductive source of frustration among the sites; I’ll get back to that later.

The idea of Sketchy started out as a whimsical nod to the early days of web development when just about every website started out with a definitive “under construction” theme.

In the mid-90′s, webmasters often labeled their sites “under construction” as if to warn hapless Internet travelers that, perchance, something might be added to the site. A funny thing happened along the way: Even as those websites grew, the “pardon our dust” monikers remained as a warning of still more stuff to come — there’s always new pages, new articles, and new features to add. Websites are never “done,” and thus the perpetual under-construction themes endured.

           

So maybe we carried on that “under construction” meme a bit too long. Giving our beta sites a decidedly unfinished look seemed topical for a 90-day beta. But when a beta goes on, sometimes for hundreds of days, folks start to wonder if the site would ever be — quote, unquote — “finished.”

A lot of folks like Sketchy. We like Sketchy, and he will be missed. But most communities don’t want to look like they’re still on the drawing board when they’ve been working tirelessly on their site for months or even years. Every Stack Exchange site will still get their own custom design when they graduate. This new Beta Theme doesn’t change that. But this new design gives your beta site a nice, clean, finished look that you can work with and display proudly for as long as necessary.

 

The Trouble With Popularity

01-31-12 by Jeff Atwood. 50 comments

Way back in 2008, we had Alexis Ohanian and Steve Huffman, the founders and co-creators of Reddit, on the Stack Overflow podcast. We chatted about a bunch of stuff, but one of the things they said that always stuck with me was that Reddit always took an explicitly hands-off, no moderation approach to their content from the very beginning.

I found that a bit shocking, since I’ve… never seen that work. Certainly on Stack Overflow and Stack Exchange we are very much pro-moderation — and more so with every passing year. We have literally hundreds of community moderators. We spend a ton of time appointing and electing moderators, as well as conducting weekly moderator chats in the Teacher’s Lounge chatroom, and emailing all our mods a monthly moderator newsletter.

The Reddit founders maintained that evil things which require active moderation didn’t happen too often, provided you build the right kind of community voting and flagging mechanisms. I can agree with that. We’ve found that to be true on Stack Exchange as well. It’s almost enough to make you a believer in the fundamental goodness of human beings.

Almost.

But there’s a deeper, more insidious problem that creeps into systems when the community is unmoderated. Stuff like, say, compilable James Bond Java ASCII art

… or mountain-climbing Skyrim horses and wounded Skyrim NPCs with vivid imaginations.

Let us not forget the classics, either:

… and so, so many more.

These sorts of posts are wildly popular with the community. The cartoon question alone had over a million views by our extremely strict view counter — which easily translates to at least two million views, possibly three million. We don’t hate fun here, but we discovered that these posts become so popular over time that they truly start to drown out everything else on the site.

Ironically, the Reddit community itself now recognizes that moderation is fundamental and essential:

One thing thing that does concern me, however, is that [as this subreddit gets more popular] the amount of image macros, memes, rage comics and generally low-quality content hitting the front page has grown to annoying proportions.

The problem with image macros and rage comics (besides generally lacking wit or anything genuinely insightful) is that they’re quick and easy to digest, and thus tend to get upvoted faster than self posts and actual discussions which take thought and time before an appropriate response can meted out. If you’re not careful you end up with something akin to /r/gaming, which is now a burbling, deformed wreck of its former self, with anything remotely resembling intelligent discussion being buried under a sea of vacuous meme-repetition.

In my view what this subreddit needs is a touch more moderation to ensure that we don’t end up with a front page full of imgur/memegenerator links, and that people who want to use this subreddit as a medium to discuss the [topic] can do so without having to sift through the crap with a shovel.

This is as clear a call for active moderation as I’ve ever seen. And the moderators, to their credit, took charge and instituted changes to help guide their community away from the fatty junk food content:

We’ve heard your concerns over the direction the community is heading. We were hoping we could ride it out and things would balance themselves, but it just isn’t working, and things need to change. It’s plain to see that meme-based content attracts many upvotes, and we all love a good laugh, but it is not what we want this community to be. But this isn’t just about memes, it’s about the general tone of the community. We’re making changes to our rules for posting, commenting, and voting here — necessary changes to make [this] the community we first envisioned.

This community is for sharing thought-provoking stories, high-level tactics discussions, videos/images of the awesomeness of [topic], suggestions or discussions on mechanics, and it can all be done without resorting to memes or complaining. Reddit never ceases to amaze, I expect to be surprised! If you have any questions, message the mods! We hope you agree and understand these changes.

We know that closing the cookie jar is painful. We feel your pain. Nobody likes having their fun taken away. But it’s too addictive and too easy, and in the absence of any moderation, the community would do nothing but add and upvote the easy, fun stuff.

This is why community moderators have real power; they need that power to intervene, educate, and refocus the community’s exuberance on more substantive content. People will fight you almost literally to the death over their right to be entertained, and to entertain others:

Why can’t you just not look at these fun posts? Why do they have to be deleted? You guys suck!

The same reason the moderators and community on that subreddit didn’t decide to “not look” at the fun posts, really:

  1. Broken windows. Every ‘fun’ post users see is an open invitation for them to participate in the fun by adding their own fun question or answer. The stuff spreads like kudzu! Pretty soon the entire site is overrun with nothing but that kind of fun. And even if you grandfather a few in, you’ll enjoy neverending requests asking why their fun question or answer has to be removed, while this one over here is allowed to remain. 
  2. Opportunity cost. Every minute spent participating in an entertaining ‘fun’ post is time that someone could have spent asking or answering a substantive question, something practical that solves an actual problem for hundreds or thousands of people. Entertainment, within reason, is by no means a bad thing — but I experience almost physical pain when I think about a brilliant topic expert spending 10 minutes on one of our sites deciding which hilarious cartoon is their favorite.

Popularity is a tough thing. I’m tempted to call it a curse, but what we try to do at Stack Exchange is make sure that questions and answers are popular for the right reasons — because they are amazing resources for learning from your peers. If you want to slip a few jokes in there with the learning, that’s fine, but when the question devolves into little more than entertainment, I hope you can understand why our community moderators are obliged to step in and protect the community from, well … itself.