site title

Topic: design

Your communities list is now customizable

03-03-14 by Jeremy Tunnell. 22 comments

A few months ago, we rolled out a new top bar for all of the Stack Exchange communities. The mission was consistency: Every community gets the same Stack Exchange brand at the top, the same navigation between sites, and the same live updates about new inbox items and reputation changes

But we realize that not everybody uses Stack Exchange the same way. Some people focus on one community, others participate in several, and more than a few spend a lot of time lurking now that we have 116 different sites to choose from.

That’s why, as promised, we have made the “Your communities” section of the Stack Exchange drop-down fully customizable so you can keep all of your favorite communities right at the top.

Edit link

Here’s how it works:

Customizing this list is completely optional. If you do nothing, you will keep the defaults: your top five communities by reputation.

Edit mode

But click the edit button and the default rules no longer apply. Instead, you can:

  1. Add a community to the list by typing the name and clicking Add
  2. Repeat #1 to add as many as you want
  3. Change the order of communities in the list by clicking and dragging
  4. Click the Save button to apply your changes!


You can reset the list to the default at any time, so try it out! Then drop by the Meta post to share your thoughts and feedback.

 

A New Top Bar for Stack Exchange

12-04-13 by David Fullerton. 225 comments

The top bar of a Stack Exchange site has always been a bit of an odd place. It somehow combines user info, navigation, search, and a one-size-fits-all popup that includes hot network questions, a list of 100+ Stack Exchange sites, personal inbox messages, and other system notifications (lovingly referred to as The StackExchange™ MultiCollider SuperDropdown™).

It was, in retrospect, overdue for a face-lift which is why we’re excited to roll out a new top bar this week.

A Bigger, Blacker Bar

The first thing you’ll notice is that it’s really black*. When we originally conceived of the top bar with the Stack Exchange logo (way back in Ye Olde 2010), one of the main goals was to mark each site as a Gen-u-wine™ Stack Exchange site. Since then, however, we’ve created unique designs for over 40 different sites, and the Stack Exchange logo has started to get a bit… lost.

So, in the redesigned top bar, we wanted to make sure that it would look the same across all sites, and make it obvious that you’re on a Stack Exchange site. It turns out that when you try to pick a color to match 40 different site designs, you quickly realize you only have one real choice: black.

* Jin points out that technically it’s not quite black: it’s #212121.

New Achievements popup

The biggest addition to the top bar is the brand new Achievements popup. Previously, if you wanted to know your reputation on every site you were active on, you had to visit every one of those sites. This led to some of us, well, compulsively cycling through sites and refreshing to see if we’d gained any rep. Now, there’s one convenient place to check from whatever site you happen to be on:

This new popup includes:

  • A reputation counter at the top which sums all reputation you’ve gained on all sites since the last time you checked, updated in real-time
  • Entries for reputation, badge, and privilege notifications, grouped by post and time
  • A summary of reputation gained today
  • Aggregation from every site in the network in one place

This should make it much easier to keep track of your reputation and badges across all the sites that you are active on.

New Sites List (aka “The Site Switcher”)

The old list of sites has gotten a new layout and is now its own distinct popup. The idea is to make it easy to switch between sites if you participate on several, or to find a new site that you don’t participate on regularly:

In the new “Site Switcher” you’ll find:

  • The current site at the top, with meta, chat, and blog links for the current site (and Stack Overflow Careers when on Stack Overflow)
  • A list of your top 5 sites, ordered by reputation*, with your reputation for each
  • A searchable list of all sites, with a short description of each

* We’ll probably let you customize this list in the near future, so you can include sites you like to watch but don’t have much reputation on.

New Global Inbox

The Global Inbox has been split out into its own popup as well, instead of a subsection of the Stack Exchange popup:

We’ve gotten rid of the confusing distinction between “inbox” and “notifications”. All messages will now appear in the inbox, except for reputation and badge events which are in the new Achievements popup. Inbox items also now have a new layout, which should be easier to scan.

Feedback Welcome

There are a few smaller changes to mention as well:

  • Your name has been replaced with your picture, to make it easier to recognize at a glance that you’re signed in as you (and because some longer names just don’t fit).
  • The help link is now a dropdown with links to the tour and the help center, with a short explanation of what each is.
  • Click areas for everything are now the full-size of the row, to make them easier to click or tap on mobile.
  • The hot network questions have moved to the sidebar on the homepage, since they aren’t really navigation or notifications.

The new top bar will be rolling out network-wide, including Area 51 and stackexchange.com, in the next few weeks. As always, meta is the place to go for feedback, suggestions, and bug reports.

The New Stack Exchange Beta Theme

03-06-12 by Robert Cartaino. 20 comments

I wanted to give you a quick look at the new Stack Exchange Beta theme. Yes, we are retiring the familiar “Sketchy” theme and rolling out a more-polished and finished design for the beta sites.

Raise the curtain, cue the trumpet fanfare…

Alas, poor Sketchy…

Over the course of the next few weeks, we will be rolling out the new Stack Exchange Beta theme to all the sites still in beta.

At first glance, the new beta theme looks like an unembellished version of any graduated site: Finished, but without any particular “beta” theme, per se. But that’s sort of the point.

The crux of this change is that it’s high time we stopped equating beta sites with being somehow unfinished. Sure, in their earliest days — when a community is defining their scope, building a FAQ, and finding its community leaders — a site might be considered unfinished (i.e. “under construction”). But once you are past those earliest wild-west days of figuring out why your site exists, a site should no longer be considered unfinished. Right out of the gate, the Stack Exchange engines gives you a world-class Q&A suite worth recommending on its own merits. If you’ve been holding back, go ahead; share, promote, and enjoy!

There was a time when we thought the average beta period would last, oh… about 90 days. The site would begin and build up enough content and users to reach critical mass. Reaching that tipping point of unstoppable growth defines “graduation.” But getting to that point is hard work, and it usually take longer than 90 days… much longer. So we’re left with this big gap between the time when a site is truly “under construction” to when it finally reaches graduation and gets its own custom design.

In the meantime, holding onto that unfinished-site meme has become actively harmful to community building, and an unproductive source of frustration among the sites; I’ll get back to that later.

The idea of Sketchy started out as a whimsical nod to the early days of web development when just about every website started out with a definitive “under construction” theme.

In the mid-90′s, webmasters often labeled their sites “under construction” as if to warn hapless Internet travelers that, perchance, something might be added to the site. A funny thing happened along the way: Even as those websites grew, the “pardon our dust” monikers remained as a warning of still more stuff to come — there’s always new pages, new articles, and new features to add. Websites are never “done,” and thus the perpetual under-construction themes endured.

           

So maybe we carried on that “under construction” meme a bit too long. Giving our beta sites a decidedly unfinished look seemed topical for a 90-day beta. But when a beta goes on, sometimes for hundreds of days, folks start to wonder if the site would ever be — quote, unquote — “finished.”

A lot of folks like Sketchy. We like Sketchy, and he will be missed. But most communities don’t want to look like they’re still on the drawing board when they’ve been working tirelessly on their site for months or even years. Every Stack Exchange site will still get their own custom design when they graduate. This new Beta Theme doesn’t change that. But this new design gives your beta site a nice, clean, finished look that you can work with and display proudly for as long as necessary.

 

The Trouble With Popularity

01-31-12 by Jeff Atwood. 50 comments

Way back in 2008, we had Alexis Ohanian and Steve Huffman, the founders and co-creators of Reddit, on the Stack Overflow podcast. We chatted about a bunch of stuff, but one of the things they said that always stuck with me was that Reddit always took an explicitly hands-off, no moderation approach to their content from the very beginning.

I found that a bit shocking, since I’ve… never seen that work. Certainly on Stack Overflow and Stack Exchange we are very much pro-moderation — and more so with every passing year. We have literally hundreds of community moderators. We spend a ton of time appointing and electing moderators, as well as conducting weekly moderator chats in the Teacher’s Lounge chatroom, and emailing all our mods a monthly moderator newsletter.

The Reddit founders maintained that evil things which require active moderation didn’t happen too often, provided you build the right kind of community voting and flagging mechanisms. I can agree with that. We’ve found that to be true on Stack Exchange as well. It’s almost enough to make you a believer in the fundamental goodness of human beings.

Almost.

But there’s a deeper, more insidious problem that creeps into systems when the community is unmoderated. Stuff like, say, compilable James Bond Java ASCII art

… or mountain-climbing Skyrim horses and wounded Skyrim NPCs with vivid imaginations.

Let us not forget the classics, either:

… and so, so many more.

These sorts of posts are wildly popular with the community. The cartoon question alone had over a million views by our extremely strict view counter — which easily translates to at least two million views, possibly three million. We don’t hate fun here, but we discovered that these posts become so popular over time that they truly start to drown out everything else on the site.

Ironically, the Reddit community itself now recognizes that moderation is fundamental and essential:

One thing thing that does concern me, however, is that [as this subreddit gets more popular] the amount of image macros, memes, rage comics and generally low-quality content hitting the front page has grown to annoying proportions.

The problem with image macros and rage comics (besides generally lacking wit or anything genuinely insightful) is that they’re quick and easy to digest, and thus tend to get upvoted faster than self posts and actual discussions which take thought and time before an appropriate response can meted out. If you’re not careful you end up with something akin to /r/gaming, which is now a burbling, deformed wreck of its former self, with anything remotely resembling intelligent discussion being buried under a sea of vacuous meme-repetition.

In my view what this subreddit needs is a touch more moderation to ensure that we don’t end up with a front page full of imgur/memegenerator links, and that people who want to use this subreddit as a medium to discuss the [topic] can do so without having to sift through the crap with a shovel.

This is as clear a call for active moderation as I’ve ever seen. And the moderators, to their credit, took charge and instituted changes to help guide their community away from the fatty junk food content:

We’ve heard your concerns over the direction the community is heading. We were hoping we could ride it out and things would balance themselves, but it just isn’t working, and things need to change. It’s plain to see that meme-based content attracts many upvotes, and we all love a good laugh, but it is not what we want this community to be. But this isn’t just about memes, it’s about the general tone of the community. We’re making changes to our rules for posting, commenting, and voting here — necessary changes to make [this] the community we first envisioned.

This community is for sharing thought-provoking stories, high-level tactics discussions, videos/images of the awesomeness of [topic], suggestions or discussions on mechanics, and it can all be done without resorting to memes or complaining. Reddit never ceases to amaze, I expect to be surprised! If you have any questions, message the mods! We hope you agree and understand these changes.

We know that closing the cookie jar is painful. We feel your pain. Nobody likes having their fun taken away. But it’s too addictive and too easy, and in the absence of any moderation, the community would do nothing but add and upvote the easy, fun stuff.

This is why community moderators have real power; they need that power to intervene, educate, and refocus the community’s exuberance on more substantive content. People will fight you almost literally to the death over their right to be entertained, and to entertain others:

Why can’t you just not look at these fun posts? Why do they have to be deleted? You guys suck!

The same reason the moderators and community on that subreddit didn’t decide to “not look” at the fun posts, really:

  1. Broken windows. Every ‘fun’ post users see is an open invitation for them to participate in the fun by adding their own fun question or answer. The stuff spreads like kudzu! Pretty soon the entire site is overrun with nothing but that kind of fun. And even if you grandfather a few in, you’ll enjoy neverending requests asking why their fun question or answer has to be removed, while this one over here is allowed to remain. 
  2. Opportunity cost. Every minute spent participating in an entertaining ‘fun’ post is time that someone could have spent asking or answering a substantive question, something practical that solves an actual problem for hundreds or thousands of people. Entertainment, within reason, is by no means a bad thing — but I experience almost physical pain when I think about a brilliant topic expert spending 10 minutes on one of our sites deciding which hilarious cartoon is their favorite.

Popularity is a tough thing. I’m tempted to call it a curse, but what we try to do at Stack Exchange is make sure that questions and answers are popular for the right reasons — because they are amazing resources for learning from your peers. If you want to slip a few jokes in there with the learning, that’s fine, but when the question devolves into little more than entertainment, I hope you can understand why our community moderators are obliged to step in and protect the community from, well … itself.

Don’t Be Afraid to Use The Science

12-07-11 by Jeff Atwood. 15 comments

I saw an interesting Battlefield 3 question on gaming a few weeks ago.

I’ve recently unlocked the EOD bot, and while playing around with it (and being hopelessly ineffectual with it) I’ve noticed that after I have driven a certain distance away I will return back to first-person view. Running towards the EOD bot will allow me to take control of it again. How far can I drive an EOD bot away from me before I lose control of it?

I play Battlefield 3! Extensively! I’ve used the remote control EOD bot before, but I have no idea what its maximum range is. I’ve never lost control of it. So I could have answered …

When I play as Engineer, I’ve never lost control of the EOD bot. Are you sure you’re not doing something wrong?

… and that is true, insofar as my in-game experience goes, but it’s kind of my opinion, isn’t it? I was curious myself. How would one figure out the actual range of the bot? I decided the only way to definitively answer this question was to:

  1. Start Battlefield 3
  2. Pick the biggest map I knew of
  3. Spawn as an Engineer
  4. Deploy the remote control EOD bot
  5. Drive the bot as far as I possibly could

So I did. Which took a solid 15 minutes of my time at least. After doing this I belatedly realized that I had just run a science experiment.

Stack Exchange just trolled me into doing actual science. For a freaking game. Wow. Consider the implications. Now, if only we could harness those powers for something useful, right? Well, take a look at this Super User question.

When programs are minimized in Windows 7, do they use less memory and CPU than leaving them maximized?

The highest voted answer has an official Microsoft Knowledge Base article backing it up, but it’s quite old. Other users dispute whether it’s correct or not. Anecdotally, I’ve read other blogs confirming the behavior described in that MSKB, but a long time ago. At least that answer has a citation backing it up; many of the other answers on the question are little more than opinions. And you know what they say about opinions. Opinions are like … beautiful flowers, everyone has their own favorite.

Super User is a technical site for computer geeks; we should be able to do better than a bunch of opinions and a smattering of links. A lot better. As a fellow Super User, I decided the best way to tell what’s going on here was to …

  1. Start a common program
  2. Do something typical in it
  3. Check Task Manager or Process Explorer to see how many resources the program is using
  4. Minimize the program
  5. Check Task Manager or Process Explorer to see how many resources the program is using

… so I did. And I edited the highest voted post to include the results of my little science experiment.

We do what we can to help new users understand how to base their answer on something other than an opinion by popping up this little help text when they start composing an answer:

Thanks for contributing an answer to {sitename}!

Please make sure you answer the question; this is a Q&A site, not a discussion forum.

Provide details and share your research. Avoid statements based solely on opinion; only make statements you can back up with an appropriate reference, or personal experiences.

To learn more, see our tips on writing great answers.

While we don’t come out and say it quite this way*, the best answers — not just on Stack Exchange, but to any question in life — should probably involve a little bit of science.

* but maybe we should