site title

Topic: community

The Trouble With Popularity

01-31-12 by Jeff Atwood. 50 comments

Way back in 2008, we had Alexis Ohanian and Steve Huffman, the founders and co-creators of Reddit, on the Stack Overflow podcast. We chatted about a bunch of stuff, but one of the things they said that always stuck with me was that Reddit always took an explicitly hands-off, no moderation approach to their content from the very beginning.

I found that a bit shocking, since I’ve… never seen that work. Certainly on Stack Overflow and Stack Exchange we are very much pro-moderation — and more so with every passing year. We have literally hundreds of community moderators. We spend a ton of time appointing and electing moderators, as well as conducting weekly moderator chats in the Teacher’s Lounge chatroom, and emailing all our mods a monthly moderator newsletter.

The Reddit founders maintained that evil things which require active moderation didn’t happen too often, provided you build the right kind of community voting and flagging mechanisms. I can agree with that. We’ve found that to be true on Stack Exchange as well. It’s almost enough to make you a believer in the fundamental goodness of human beings.

Almost.

But there’s a deeper, more insidious problem that creeps into systems when the community is unmoderated. Stuff like, say, compilable James Bond Java ASCII art

… or mountain-climbing Skyrim horses and wounded Skyrim NPCs with vivid imaginations.

Let us not forget the classics, either:

… and so, so many more.

These sorts of posts are wildly popular with the community. The cartoon question alone had over a million views by our extremely strict view counter — which easily translates to at least two million views, possibly three million. We don’t hate fun here, but we discovered that these posts become so popular over time that they truly start to drown out everything else on the site.

Ironically, the Reddit community itself now recognizes that moderation is fundamental and essential:

One thing thing that does concern me, however, is that [as this subreddit gets more popular] the amount of image macros, memes, rage comics and generally low-quality content hitting the front page has grown to annoying proportions.

The problem with image macros and rage comics (besides generally lacking wit or anything genuinely insightful) is that they’re quick and easy to digest, and thus tend to get upvoted faster than self posts and actual discussions which take thought and time before an appropriate response can meted out. If you’re not careful you end up with something akin to /r/gaming, which is now a burbling, deformed wreck of its former self, with anything remotely resembling intelligent discussion being buried under a sea of vacuous meme-repetition.

In my view what this subreddit needs is a touch more moderation to ensure that we don’t end up with a front page full of imgur/memegenerator links, and that people who want to use this subreddit as a medium to discuss the [topic] can do so without having to sift through the crap with a shovel.

This is as clear a call for active moderation as I’ve ever seen. And the moderators, to their credit, took charge and instituted changes to help guide their community away from the fatty junk food content:

We’ve heard your concerns over the direction the community is heading. We were hoping we could ride it out and things would balance themselves, but it just isn’t working, and things need to change. It’s plain to see that meme-based content attracts many upvotes, and we all love a good laugh, but it is not what we want this community to be. But this isn’t just about memes, it’s about the general tone of the community. We’re making changes to our rules for posting, commenting, and voting here — necessary changes to make [this] the community we first envisioned.

This community is for sharing thought-provoking stories, high-level tactics discussions, videos/images of the awesomeness of [topic], suggestions or discussions on mechanics, and it can all be done without resorting to memes or complaining. Reddit never ceases to amaze, I expect to be surprised! If you have any questions, message the mods! We hope you agree and understand these changes.

We know that closing the cookie jar is painful. We feel your pain. Nobody likes having their fun taken away. But it’s too addictive and too easy, and in the absence of any moderation, the community would do nothing but add and upvote the easy, fun stuff.

This is why community moderators have real power; they need that power to intervene, educate, and refocus the community’s exuberance on more substantive content. People will fight you almost literally to the death over their right to be entertained, and to entertain others:

Why can’t you just not look at these fun posts? Why do they have to be deleted? You guys suck!

The same reason the moderators and community on that subreddit didn’t decide to “not look” at the fun posts, really:

  1. Broken windows. Every ‘fun’ post users see is an open invitation for them to participate in the fun by adding their own fun question or answer. The stuff spreads like kudzu! Pretty soon the entire site is overrun with nothing but that kind of fun. And even if you grandfather a few in, you’ll enjoy neverending requests asking why their fun question or answer has to be removed, while this one over here is allowed to remain. 
  2. Opportunity cost. Every minute spent participating in an entertaining ‘fun’ post is time that someone could have spent asking or answering a substantive question, something practical that solves an actual problem for hundreds or thousands of people. Entertainment, within reason, is by no means a bad thing — but I experience almost physical pain when I think about a brilliant topic expert spending 10 minutes on one of our sites deciding which hilarious cartoon is their favorite.

Popularity is a tough thing. I’m tempted to call it a curse, but what we try to do at Stack Exchange is make sure that questions and answers are popular for the right reasons — because they are amazing resources for learning from your peers. If you want to slip a few jokes in there with the learning, that’s fine, but when the question devolves into little more than entertainment, I hope you can understand why our community moderators are obliged to step in and protect the community from, well … itself.

Stack Exchange Data Explorer 2.0

01-15-12 by Sam Saffron. 4 comments

It has been a year and a half since we launched Data Explorer. In the past few months Tim Stone (on a community grant) and I have pushed a major round of changes. Thanks Tim!

Recap on last years changes

Since we publicly launched data explorer, the most notable change contributed back from the community was support for query plans, big thanks to Justin for submitting the patch.

We also added quite a few bug fixes/features, mostly around merging users. Some features were added to defend data.se against an onslaught of public queries. A few features were added to support non Stack Exchange data dumps, most notably a system for white listing. Our very own Rebecca Chernoff ported Data Explorer to ASP.NET MVC3 amongst many other fixes.

The current round of changes offers some very cool new functionality, which is worth listing:

Query revisions

When we created Data Explorer there was no way to track a query’s “lineage”. This was particularly problematic because we had no way of updating featured queries or shared queries. Even I complained about this on meta.

The new pipeline works just like Gist, you can track the history of your query as you are editing (attributing the various editors along the way):


You can link to a specific revision, or simply share a “query set” by using the permalink. By sharing a “query set” you can later on fix up any issues the query has, without needing to update the link. The new pipeline allows you to “fork” any query created by other users and tracks attribution along the way.

Graphs

We added some basic graphing facilities, supporting 2 types of line graphs:

The first type is a simple graph, where the first column represents the X-axis and the other columns the data points. For example: a graph of questions and answers per month.

The second type is a bit trickier, it unpivots the second column in the result set. For example: a graph of questions per tag for top 10 tags.

Huge open source upgrade

Data Explorer consumes a fair amount of open source libraries. In the past year and a half many have evolved. We took the time to upgrade them all.

The excellent Code Mirror was updated to the 2.0 version, the new version no longer uses messy iframes. Marjin wrote a great post explaining the changes, a fantastic read for any JavaScript developers.

SlickGrid, which in my opinion is the best grid control built on jQuery, was upgraded to version infinity.

100% more Dapper

Dapper our open source micro ORM is the only ORM Data Explorer uses. We took the time to port the entire solution to Dapper. I even added a few CRUD helpers so you are not stuck hard coding INSERT and UPDATE statements everywhere.

Data Explorer is a good open source example of how we code web sites at Stack Overflow. It is built on our stack using many of our helpers. Dapper and related helpers are used for data access. It uses the same homebrew migration system we use in production and an interesting asset packaging system I wrote (for the record, Ben wrote a much more awesome one that we use in production, lobby him to get it blogged). It also uses MiniProfiler for profiling. MiniProfiler is even enabled in production, so go have a play.

Lots of smaller less notable fixes

  • We now have a concept of “user preferences”, so we can remember which tab you selected, etc.
  • We remember the page you were at and try to redirect you there after you log on.
  • We attribute the query properly to the creator / editor from the query show page.
  • You can page through your queries on your user page.
  • Support for arbitrary hyperlinks
  • Revamped object browser, you can collapse table definitions
  • Lots of other stuff I forgot :)

You too can run Data Explorer

At Stack Exchange we run 3 different instances of Data Explorer. We have the public Data Explorer and a couple of private instances we use to explore other data sets. The first private instance is used for raw site database access. The other is used to browse through our haproxy logs.

There is nothing forcing you to point Data Explorer at a Stack Exchange data dump, the vast majority of the features work fine pointed at an arbitrary database.

Hope you enjoy this round of changes.

If there are any bugs or feature requests please post them to Meta Stack Overflow. Data Explorer is open source, patches welcome.

Stack Exchange API V2.0 Public Beta

12-26-11 by Kevin Montrose. 7 comments

More than a year and a half ago we unveiled the first version of the Stack Exchange API to the wider world.  Since then we’ve had a minor point release, improved app and script listing, and shared some statistics about the consumers of our API.

I’ve been pretty pleased with version 1.1, stackexchange.com and our chat software make extensive use of it, there are a good number of useful applications listed, and a couple of parties are pulling interesting statistics out using it.  It’s been a success, but the shine’s definitely come off; there are some use cases we didn’t support, some missing features, and just some plain-old mistakes.

That’s why I’m pleased to announce…

The public beta for Version 2.0 of the Stack Exchange API

We’ve been consuming this internally for a bit, and a rather low-key private beta has been going on for the last few weeks.  With any luck we’ve flushed out any really bad bugs and functional deficiencies.

If you want to hop right in, go take a look at the documentation and then register an app.

Just like last time, we’re running a contest to encourage some applications that exercise the sweet new features in V2.0.

First Prize

For the most awesome application, you’ll get an iPad 2.

Second Prize

Second place will get an Acer Aspire One.

Third Prize

For third place, a 160 GB Intel SSD.

Library

We’ve tried to make the API easy to understand and use, we’re aware of the great advantages of wrapping some complexity away in a library.  Building an awesome library makes it easier for future developers to get up and running against our API.

The author of the best library will get a Kindle Fire.

Bug Reports

Even if you don’t have any app ideas, and can’t afford to invest the time needed in building a full library, you can still participate in the contest.  Each bug you find makes the API a little bit better for the rest of the community.

Those who we feel have contributed substantially to the quality of the API with their bug reports will get to choose between a Kindle Touch 3G, or a Lilliput Mini USB Monitor.

 

The Rules

  • Contest open to every man, woman, and child on planet Earth, except those men, women, or children living in places where contests like this are somehow illegal.
  • Only applications and libraries/wrappers listed on the apps tab of stackapps.com are eligible for consideration.
  • The application or library/wrapper must be written using our API, and work against all of our sites.
  • Libraries must expose all available methods in the API in some fashion.  I’d advise comprehensive examples to make it clear you’ve covered everything.
  • While we do have a prize to recognize the best library/wrapper, to be eligible for the first 3 prizes you must build an application.
  • If you live in an area of the world where it is logistically impossible for us to get your prize to you — like, say, because your nearest Apple retailer is 3000 nautical miles away — we’ll make something work.
  • Your app must work against the final, 2.0 released version of the API.  The “beta” moniker will have come off the API before the contest ends.
  • If your app depends on an app store for distribution, you must have some way of getting the app to us to judge if it is not yet approved when the contest ends.  We’ll contact you to get a copy, but you’ve got to get our notice first so put some real effort into your Stack Apps post.

We’ll be judging apps based on how awesome and useful we, the rapidly increasing employees of Stack Exchange, find them.

The library prize will be chosen by the development team, and who knows we may pull it into our projects (as Stacky, the previous winner, was into stackexchange.com).  While we don’t care about platform, we do care about documentation and examples, so make yours exemplary.

The bug report prizes will be sent to anyone we feel went above and beyond in finding bugs in the API, there’s no limit to the number of people who may win.

All entries must be listed on Stack Apps by 11:59 PM UTC February 29th, 2012, we’ll be judging entries in the first few weeks of March and announcing winners subsequently.

Own Your Community

12-15-11 by Laura Dobrzynski-Gessner. 14 comments

Each of our 73 sites has a common goal: to own their community. Taking ownership means (in part) figuring out how to promote the site, make it attractive to newcomers, and make the awesome content and community even more awesome. While we have internal- and external-facing teams of employees to help with this, Stack Exchange is fundamentally driven by the people who use it. Here are a couple of ways that two Stack Exchange communities have come up with to improve their sites.**

Answer-a-thon!

One of the things we pride ourselves on is the ridiculously high answer rates on our sites. (Some other sites won’t publish their answer rates.) This doesn’t just magically happen, though. It takes a concerted effort by dedicated users. Travel Stack Exchange users held an answer-a-thon event on Halloween to clean up the site’s unanswered questions. What’s special about this approach is that – though they did knock their “unanswered question” count from 19 to 0 in a single evening – they also encouraged users to add new information to already answered questions to keep them fresh and relevant. To create a little camaraderie in the cleanup event, there was a simultaneous chat event, which was announced in the answer-a-thon meta post. Some people might view a list of unanswered questions as a tedious chore, but if you know that friends will be around in chat to keep you company as you work through that list, it makes the task much more enjoyable. And hey, you might get to meet some new interesting people you might not otherwise have interacted with!

Since the first event was successful, the Travel SE community is doing it again this month. They are also taking this model and applying it to other housekeeping tasks that can be key differentiators between a good site and an awesome site: for example, the community is now working on sorting out tags and has an ongoing call to fill out tag wikis. (Bonus points if your call to action includes a custom graphic with photos of company founders.)

Topic Challenge

The Jewish Life and Learning community employs a unique means of encouraging a stream of new topics: their weekly topic challenge. It’s simple, yet effective: users propose topics on meta, which are voted up or down based on what other users would like to answer, and the week’s topic is announced through a separate meta thread every week.

Choosing a new theme each week is a tactic that works. I know that, personally, there are sites where I’d love to contribute more, but sometimes coming up with a question can be tough. These topic prompts can break this writer’s block and nudge users into articulating what it is they want to ask. Trying to come up with a single question among the many possibilities of a site’s scope is overwhelming sometimes.

In summary, these are two great methods that any Stack Exchange site can adopt to improve their site and strengthen ties among users:

  • Turn housekeeping chores into a party by encouraging users to be in your chat room during the concerted effort at [X activity] – for technical support, discussion of site-related issues, or amiable chatter to help pass the time.

  • Adopt a “Topic Challenge” to encourage a continual flow of new content about interesting topics.

Do you participate on a Stack Exchange site that has come up with some good ideas to promote or improve the community? Let us know in the comments if you have great examples that can inspire other users!


** These two are examples; many of our sites have run successful initiatives that they started with little or no help from Stack Exchange employees. But let’s be honest: this post would be far too long if I listed every great thing initiated by each of our sites.

Note: The proper method of promotion for these community-inspired initiatives is each site’s meta, or (if the site is graduated) by generating community ads. System messages are inappropriate for announcing a recurring event and should be reserved for truly important, rare occurrences like moderator elections or site maintenance.

Come Here Often?

12-14-11 by Alison Sperling. 16 comments

The holiday season is upon us, and as another year comes to an end, it is Stack Overflow Annual User Survey time again! So, take a break from wrapping gifts and come tell us about yourself. We promise it will only take a few minutes of your time.

Of course, as the “annual” implies, we’ve been running a survey for a few years now, including last year’s survey which marked the first time the anonymous data was formally used in support of selling advertising on Stack Overflow and Server Fault. This data is an important part of keeping the lights on around here, and, as a user of either of those two sites, or any Stack Exchange site for that matter, we ask you to participate.

For the fine comrades who continue to support us, you’ll find that this year’s survey is similar to last year’s, but with some important updates made to the technology references and a few items of particular interest to users looking at the data. For example, upon several suggestions we’ve added a question measuring reputation for those respondents with an account, using ranges, to make sure things stay anonymous.  Also, with developers in high demand, we’ve added a few questions related to our Stack Overflow Careers service and even one shameless plug for Stack Overflow users who have not yet created a programmer profile.

Banner Ad on Stack Overflow to Promote the Survey

As in previous years, we are promoting the survey via banner ads like the above on Stack Overflow and of course right here with this blog post.  The survey will be open until we get to enough responses to be deemed statistically significant, which will probably take about 3,500 responses, but of course the more the merrier. Finally, we will be sharing the results in a blog post, and giving you the opportunity to sign up at the end of the survey to receive a copy of the final results via email. So, please take the survey now, and bask in the simple pleasure of checking one more item off your holiday shopping list.