site title

Topic: community

Stack Exchange API V2.0 Public Beta

12-26-11 by Kevin Montrose. 7 comments

More than a year and a half ago we unveiled the first version of the Stack Exchange API to the wider world.  Since then we’ve had a minor point release, improved app and script listing, and shared some statistics about the consumers of our API.

I’ve been pretty pleased with version 1.1, stackexchange.com and our chat software make extensive use of it, there are a good number of useful applications listed, and a couple of parties are pulling interesting statistics out using it.  It’s been a success, but the shine’s definitely come off; there are some use cases we didn’t support, some missing features, and just some plain-old mistakes.

That’s why I’m pleased to announce…

The public beta for Version 2.0 of the Stack Exchange API

We’ve been consuming this internally for a bit, and a rather low-key private beta has been going on for the last few weeks.  With any luck we’ve flushed out any really bad bugs and functional deficiencies.

If you want to hop right in, go take a look at the documentation and then register an app.

Just like last time, we’re running a contest to encourage some applications that exercise the sweet new features in V2.0.

First Prize

For the most awesome application, you’ll get an iPad 2.

Second Prize

Second place will get an Acer Aspire One.

Third Prize

For third place, a 160 GB Intel SSD.

Library

We’ve tried to make the API easy to understand and use, we’re aware of the great advantages of wrapping some complexity away in a library.  Building an awesome library makes it easier for future developers to get up and running against our API.

The author of the best library will get a Kindle Fire.

Bug Reports

Even if you don’t have any app ideas, and can’t afford to invest the time needed in building a full library, you can still participate in the contest.  Each bug you find makes the API a little bit better for the rest of the community.

Those who we feel have contributed substantially to the quality of the API with their bug reports will get to choose between a Kindle Touch 3G, or a Lilliput Mini USB Monitor.

 

The Rules

  • Contest open to every man, woman, and child on planet Earth, except those men, women, or children living in places where contests like this are somehow illegal.
  • Only applications and libraries/wrappers listed on the apps tab of stackapps.com are eligible for consideration.
  • The application or library/wrapper must be written using our API, and work against all of our sites.
  • Libraries must expose all available methods in the API in some fashion.  I’d advise comprehensive examples to make it clear you’ve covered everything.
  • While we do have a prize to recognize the best library/wrapper, to be eligible for the first 3 prizes you must build an application.
  • If you live in an area of the world where it is logistically impossible for us to get your prize to you — like, say, because your nearest Apple retailer is 3000 nautical miles away — we’ll make something work.
  • Your app must work against the final, 2.0 released version of the API.  The “beta” moniker will have come off the API before the contest ends.
  • If your app depends on an app store for distribution, you must have some way of getting the app to us to judge if it is not yet approved when the contest ends.  We’ll contact you to get a copy, but you’ve got to get our notice first so put some real effort into your Stack Apps post.

We’ll be judging apps based on how awesome and useful we, the rapidly increasing employees of Stack Exchange, find them.

The library prize will be chosen by the development team, and who knows we may pull it into our projects (as Stacky, the previous winner, was into stackexchange.com).  While we don’t care about platform, we do care about documentation and examples, so make yours exemplary.

The bug report prizes will be sent to anyone we feel went above and beyond in finding bugs in the API, there’s no limit to the number of people who may win.

All entries must be listed on Stack Apps by 11:59 PM UTC February 29th, 2012, we’ll be judging entries in the first few weeks of March and announcing winners subsequently.

Own Your Community

12-15-11 by Laura Dobrzynski-Gessner. 14 comments

Each of our 73 sites has a common goal: to own their community. Taking ownership means (in part) figuring out how to promote the site, make it attractive to newcomers, and make the awesome content and community even more awesome. While we have internal- and external-facing teams of employees to help with this, Stack Exchange is fundamentally driven by the people who use it. Here are a couple of ways that two Stack Exchange communities have come up with to improve their sites.**

Answer-a-thon!

One of the things we pride ourselves on is the ridiculously high answer rates on our sites. (Some other sites won’t publish their answer rates.) This doesn’t just magically happen, though. It takes a concerted effort by dedicated users. Travel Stack Exchange users held an answer-a-thon event on Halloween to clean up the site’s unanswered questions. What’s special about this approach is that – though they did knock their “unanswered question” count from 19 to 0 in a single evening – they also encouraged users to add new information to already answered questions to keep them fresh and relevant. To create a little camaraderie in the cleanup event, there was a simultaneous chat event, which was announced in the answer-a-thon meta post. Some people might view a list of unanswered questions as a tedious chore, but if you know that friends will be around in chat to keep you company as you work through that list, it makes the task much more enjoyable. And hey, you might get to meet some new interesting people you might not otherwise have interacted with!

Since the first event was successful, the Travel SE community is doing it again this month. They are also taking this model and applying it to other housekeeping tasks that can be key differentiators between a good site and an awesome site: for example, the community is now working on sorting out tags and has an ongoing call to fill out tag wikis. (Bonus points if your call to action includes a custom graphic with photos of company founders.)

Topic Challenge

The Jewish Life and Learning community employs a unique means of encouraging a stream of new topics: their weekly topic challenge. It’s simple, yet effective: users propose topics on meta, which are voted up or down based on what other users would like to answer, and the week’s topic is announced through a separate meta thread every week.

Choosing a new theme each week is a tactic that works. I know that, personally, there are sites where I’d love to contribute more, but sometimes coming up with a question can be tough. These topic prompts can break this writer’s block and nudge users into articulating what it is they want to ask. Trying to come up with a single question among the many possibilities of a site’s scope is overwhelming sometimes.

In summary, these are two great methods that any Stack Exchange site can adopt to improve their site and strengthen ties among users:

  • Turn housekeeping chores into a party by encouraging users to be in your chat room during the concerted effort at [X activity] – for technical support, discussion of site-related issues, or amiable chatter to help pass the time.

  • Adopt a “Topic Challenge” to encourage a continual flow of new content about interesting topics.

Do you participate on a Stack Exchange site that has come up with some good ideas to promote or improve the community? Let us know in the comments if you have great examples that can inspire other users!


** These two are examples; many of our sites have run successful initiatives that they started with little or no help from Stack Exchange employees. But let’s be honest: this post would be far too long if I listed every great thing initiated by each of our sites.

Note: The proper method of promotion for these community-inspired initiatives is each site’s meta, or (if the site is graduated) by generating community ads. System messages are inappropriate for announcing a recurring event and should be reserved for truly important, rare occurrences like moderator elections or site maintenance.

Come Here Often?

12-14-11 by Alison Sperling. 16 comments

The holiday season is upon us, and as another year comes to an end, it is Stack Overflow Annual User Survey time again! So, take a break from wrapping gifts and come tell us about yourself. We promise it will only take a few minutes of your time.

Of course, as the “annual” implies, we’ve been running a survey for a few years now, including last year’s survey which marked the first time the anonymous data was formally used in support of selling advertising on Stack Overflow and Server Fault. This data is an important part of keeping the lights on around here, and, as a user of either of those two sites, or any Stack Exchange site for that matter, we ask you to participate.

For the fine comrades who continue to support us, you’ll find that this year’s survey is similar to last year’s, but with some important updates made to the technology references and a few items of particular interest to users looking at the data. For example, upon several suggestions we’ve added a question measuring reputation for those respondents with an account, using ranges, to make sure things stay anonymous.  Also, with developers in high demand, we’ve added a few questions related to our Stack Overflow Careers service and even one shameless plug for Stack Overflow users who have not yet created a programmer profile.

Banner Ad on Stack Overflow to Promote the Survey

As in previous years, we are promoting the survey via banner ads like the above on Stack Overflow and of course right here with this blog post.  The survey will be open until we get to enough responses to be deemed statistically significant, which will probably take about 3,500 responses, but of course the more the merrier. Finally, we will be sharing the results in a blog post, and giving you the opportunity to sign up at the end of the survey to receive a copy of the final results via email. So, please take the survey now, and bask in the simple pleasure of checking one more item off your holiday shopping list.

Don’t Be Afraid to Use The Science

12-07-11 by Jeff Atwood. 15 comments

I saw an interesting Battlefield 3 question on gaming a few weeks ago.

I’ve recently unlocked the EOD bot, and while playing around with it (and being hopelessly ineffectual with it) I’ve noticed that after I have driven a certain distance away I will return back to first-person view. Running towards the EOD bot will allow me to take control of it again. How far can I drive an EOD bot away from me before I lose control of it?

I play Battlefield 3! Extensively! I’ve used the remote control EOD bot before, but I have no idea what its maximum range is. I’ve never lost control of it. So I could have answered …

When I play as Engineer, I’ve never lost control of the EOD bot. Are you sure you’re not doing something wrong?

… and that is true, insofar as my in-game experience goes, but it’s kind of my opinion, isn’t it? I was curious myself. How would one figure out the actual range of the bot? I decided the only way to definitively answer this question was to:

  1. Start Battlefield 3
  2. Pick the biggest map I knew of
  3. Spawn as an Engineer
  4. Deploy the remote control EOD bot
  5. Drive the bot as far as I possibly could

So I did. Which took a solid 15 minutes of my time at least. After doing this I belatedly realized that I had just run a science experiment.

Stack Exchange just trolled me into doing actual science. For a freaking game. Wow. Consider the implications. Now, if only we could harness those powers for something useful, right? Well, take a look at this Super User question.

When programs are minimized in Windows 7, do they use less memory and CPU than leaving them maximized?

The highest voted answer has an official Microsoft Knowledge Base article backing it up, but it’s quite old. Other users dispute whether it’s correct or not. Anecdotally, I’ve read other blogs confirming the behavior described in that MSKB, but a long time ago. At least that answer has a citation backing it up; many of the other answers on the question are little more than opinions. And you know what they say about opinions. Opinions are like … beautiful flowers, everyone has their own favorite.

Super User is a technical site for computer geeks; we should be able to do better than a bunch of opinions and a smattering of links. A lot better. As a fellow Super User, I decided the best way to tell what’s going on here was to …

  1. Start a common program
  2. Do something typical in it
  3. Check Task Manager or Process Explorer to see how many resources the program is using
  4. Minimize the program
  5. Check Task Manager or Process Explorer to see how many resources the program is using

… so I did. And I edited the highest voted post to include the results of my little science experiment.

We do what we can to help new users understand how to base their answer on something other than an opinion by popping up this little help text when they start composing an answer:

Thanks for contributing an answer to {sitename}!

Please make sure you answer the question; this is a Q&A site, not a discussion forum.

Provide details and share your research. Avoid statements based solely on opinion; only make statements you can back up with an appropriate reference, or personal experiences.

To learn more, see our tips on writing great answers.

While we don’t come out and say it quite this way*, the best answers — not just on Stack Exchange, but to any question in life — should probably involve a little bit of science.

* but maybe we should

Free Vote-Based Advertising Launches 1H 2012

12-04-11 by Robert Cartaino. 0 comments

For almost two years, we’ve reached out to our programmer communities to support open-source projects.

Free Vote-Based Advertising for Open Source Projects

It’s time once again to publicize your favorite open-source projects in need of programmer assistance. Every six months, we accept new submissions for free open-sourced advertising to be served in an ad slot on Stack Overflow.

The program is simple: Create a 220 pixels by 250 pixel image ad and submit it to the Open Source Advertising – Sidebar. If it receives at least 6 votes, it will be served up to the community! The rules are listed on the site, so please read them carefully before submitting.

Submit your ad and vote here!

Then, visit the ad summary page and mouse-over the ‘view stats’ link to see how each ad is doing.

Congratulations to ELMAH and JS Studio for earning the top votes in the last round!

    

The next round has already begun, so drop by our Graphic Design site and brush up on your image manipulation and illustrator skills. There are a lot of open source projects that need your help to bring them some much-needed publicity!

And don’t forget to come back often and vote for the newest entries.