site title

Topic: community

Week 2 of the Summer of Love: Researching Comments

07-23-12 by Seth Rogers. 50 comments

The quality of the Q&A on Stack Overflow continues to outshine any other on the Internet – thanks to the awesome community. Like any community, unspoken rules eventually become expectations. In the previous post in this series, Joel talks about how the community developed its own set of rules and norms that new recruits simply don’t know about. When a new comer walks into the group and puts her hand up for a high-five and gets chastised by the group because they don’t give high-fives, she walks away embarrassed with head hanging low. That’s unfortunate.

This isn’t a new concern of course – almost four years ago, one day after Stack Overflow left private beta, Chris Upchurch wrote one of the most famous pleas for kindness in response to attacks he observed on new users in Could we please be a bit nicer to the noobs?

A year and a half later, we saw the opposite opportunity for self-reflection when Satoru.Logic, then a member for just over 4 months, asked Why are Stack Overflow people nice? – which was followed up a year later by veteran member dmckee with Are Stack Overflow people still nice?

There’ve been dozens of discussions along these lines over the years, reflecting an increasing perception of our Jekyll & Hyde nature. But always lacking was anything more than anecdotal evidence. And as Stack Overflow grew, it became easier and easier to cherry-pick examples that showed the community as either friendly or fierce. So we decided to gather some objective data:

Comment Friendliness: The Science Hammer

trend graph of comment friendliness over timeTo investigate, we sampled 7,000 comments written on questions on SO and collected 20 independent ratings of attitude for each and every sampled comment (ratings obtained via experienced raters on Mechanical Turk). Comments were randomly selected over the past 3 years. Then we calculated “friendliness scores” for comments based on all 20 ratings.

The first thing we found is that comments on Stack Overflow are, in fact, getting friendlier. As we see in the chart, friendliness ratings are generally positive and continue to trend that way. Since May 2011 at least 75% of all comments sampled are rated positively. Statistical modeling of the data supports these observations: comments now are significantly friendlier than they were three years ago. What about the unfriendly portion? We’ll get to that later.

The next thing we looked into is friendliness differences between tags. According to our sample, comments tagged in ‘C’ tend to be rated as less friendly compared to others. And subtly, ‘Android’ is friendliest. However, the data only reflects minor differences so we should interpret this trend with a grain of Kosher salt…nevertheless, this does address another long-standing question: are programmers using certain languages or technologies more welcoming of newbie questions?

We found that comments on first posts are significantly less friendly compared to the rest, regardless of time period. Though the total percentage of nice comments is increasing (awesome!), the few unfriendly cases can unfortunately drag down a new member’s experience. Experience has taught us that newcomers tend to *really* remember their first interactions within a community; in this case the small percentage of rude comments carry disproportionately more weight in the memory of the newcomer and affect their impressions of the community.

Conclusions

So now that we have some hard data, the question arises: is this a problem, and is it worth addressing? If the majority of comments are friendly and getting friendlier, why risk rocking the boat? The short answer is simply that 3/4 “nice” is still a long way from “Total civility [...] one hundred percent of the time.” It doesn’t take an overwhelming amount of rudeness to create that impression in casual readers, and becoming complacent about our “niceness” is the quickest way to become blind to its absence. We’ll delve into this further in our next installment, but for now I’ll leave you with a question from dmckee:

Is there something else we can do to encourage our big city to keep the small-town feel we grew up with?


If you’re curious on how exactly we collected and analyzed this data, feel free to download the full summary. Look forward to the next post in the series discussing mechanisms and community solutions! And don’t forget; at Stack HQ, we love you all.


Update: Comment examples on MSO

Kicking off the Summer of Love

07-20-12 by Joel Spolsky. 99 comments

It’s summer here at StackHQ. Have a flower!

Flower

You’re welcome. Now on to some serious work. Can we talk about cultural anthropology for a minute? I’d like to talk about what happens when a community (online or off) gets to be about… oh, three or four years old.

Every community starts out needing to recruit members, so they tend to be very friendly to newcomers.

After a few years, an insider group of old-timers forms. They get to know each other. They know the rules. They know the history and the legends of the community. And it’s only natural to get little bit irritated when newbies show up who don’t know the rules.

Newbies will show up, make a newbie mistake, like wearing shoes indoors or forgetting to close the toilet lid, and the old-timers will look at each other, roll their eyes, and snort, “Typical!”

At this point, if it’s a normal human community, it will start to feel a little bit unfriendly to outsiders. Insular. 

And the newbies will say, “well, gosh, that’s not a very friendly place.”

Not just the newbies who got scolded. Also the 100 passers-by who saw the newbies get scolded. Who might have been great members of the community, and who did nothing wrong, but who are not really interested in joining a community that appears to be full of smug jerks.

This is very dangerous. You have to be able to recruit new members to replace the old ones that drift away. The success of the community depends on it.

Now that Stack Exchange is getting to about that age, we’re starting to see some warning signs that the community is getting insular.

Don’t get me wrong; it’s still a remarkably friendly place.

But we have some of our own weird rules, that take a while to figure out. Rules about shopping questions, subjective questions, and “localized” questions. Those are very important rules, but when newbies violate them, we can be somewhat snarky. I did a quick survey and found that about 50% of questions that are closed on Stack Overflow are also accompanied by an unfriendly comment. So it isn’t surprising that newbies are turned off.

So we decided to declare the summer of 2012 as The Summer of Love, a.k.a. “The Hunting of the Snark.” The goal is simple: to keep Stack Exchange a welcoming, friendly place without lowering our standards. No, you may not ask “plz send me the code” questions, but if you do, we will explain to you, in a friendly and professional way, what you did wrong.

You’ve probably already seen the first phases of this campaign. To kick it off, Shog9 deleted the “What Stack Overflow is Not” thread on meta.stackoverflow.com, which started out with the best of intentions (indeed it was intended to help newbies come up to speed), but it turned into an accidental factory of unfriendly comments. We’ve started talking about how to be civil and we’ll continue that. And to make everything, you know, scientific, we’ve started actually measuring friendliness in comments, automatically, using Mechanical Turk. We’ll share some astonishing results of that study with you soon.

Don’t lose track of the big picture. Stack Exchange works because it’s a remarkably good place to get information. Having the correct information always trumps having it in a pretty, perfumed way covered with flowers. If the only person that knows the answer to my question is a remarkable grump and can’t give me the answer without insulting my ancestry, I’ll probably take the answer and lick my wounds later.

But that’s not the choice. The way to get great answers is to get lots of people contributing. The way to get lots of people contributing is to recruit more people to participate on Stack Exchange. The way to recruit more people is to be nice. So being nice is not at odds with getting good answers, it supports getting good answers. And that’s why it’s important to us.

2012 Stack Overflow Community Moderator Election Begins

06-04-12 by Shog9. 8 comments

Hard to believe it’s been only six months since the last moderator election on Stack Overflow…

Remember A Theory of Moderation? It talks about how moderators are the “human exception handlers” on Stack Overflow, elected to deal with those rare situations the normal community moderation can’t handle. It also notes:

The most common moderator task is to follow up on flagged posts. Every post contains a small flag link, which anyone with 15 reputation can use.

Over 200K users with at least 15 reputation have accessed Stack Overflow in the past three months. That’s a lot of folks able to raise a red flag – and a lot of them do.

With 12 moderators on Stack Overflow, handling the more than 1,300 flags each day has become an increasingly heavy load to bear – so we’re looking for a few good men or women willing to step up and help. If you’re an experienced, community-minded member of Stack Overflow, willing to devote a bit of time each day to assisting your comrades, visit http://stackoverflow.com/election and nominate yourself.

Of course, needing more moderators is a good problem to have - it means Stack Overflow is thriving, its community able to recognize when a something on the site needs attention. That said, there’s something a bit wrong with this many flags going to the exception handlers, when many of them can and should be handled by other trusted members of the community. Last fall we started experimenting with ways of presenting some flags – those most likely to require actions available to ordinary users – to the 10K users first, and forward them only to moderators when unresolved in a reasonable period of time. We’ll be expanding this in the next month to put flagging for action (close, delete, re-open, etc.) and voting for action in the same league when it comes to requiring moderator intervention. Stay tuned…

Stack Overflow Meetup Everywhere: April 28, 2012

03-26-12 by Laura Dobrzynski-Gessner. 25 comments

Last year’s Stack Overflow Meetups were a success, with over 2000 people participating around the world. We’re happy to announce that the Second Annual Stack Overflow Meetup Day is April 28, 2012.

2011 Meetup Locations

Because the Stack Exchange network grew so much over 2011, we’ve decided our Meetup day should grow, too. This year we’re calling on every hacker, programmer, or designer in the Stack Exchange tech community to meet up with other users, say hello, and maybe learn something. Whether you’re a member of Stack Overflow, Server Fault, Super User, Programmers, Ask Ubuntu, Game Development, or any other technology-themed Stack Exchange site, we want you to be a part of this event.*

Why does this event exist?

Even though we constantly say that Stack Exchange is not a social network, you (the community) share your knowledge and help our sites grow. The community is important, and since we don’t have friends lists or private messaging, we want to give the community a chance to get to know each other. But we need your help.

How do I get involved?

Just like last year, we’re using Meetup.com to make it easy for users to organize a local face-to-face event  - or to join one that someone else has planned. Visit meetup.com/stackoverflow to find your local Stack Overflow MeetUp group. If there is no group in your area, start one! As other people join, you can choose a venue (library, community center, restaurant, etc.) for the event. Those interested in playing a little bit larger role can volunteer to be planners.

If there was a meetup in your community last year, it will be shown in the list on meetup.com/stackoverflow. An event has automatically been created for this year; all you need to do is RVSP and suggest a location.

If you search for your city (or a city near you) and don’t see it in the results list, add a new community!

 

 

What should my event look like?

Your event can take whatever shape suits your local community. Feeling generous? Plan group volunteering activities. Have a great open-source project you’ve been working on? Present it! Know someone who loves to talk programming in front of crowds? Ask them to guest speak! Or, plan an Ignite-style event where anyone can present an idea in five minutes or less. The options are endless.

To help you get started planning an event, take a look at what some of our users did last year or hop over to the Worldwide Meetup chat room to trade ideas and stories with other Meetup planners.

What if I’m busy on April 28th?

If you find that you and all the other Stack Exchange techies in your area can’t get together on April 28th, that’s okay! We don’t want you to miss out on the fun, so just pick any other day around the 28th – we don’t mind if people celebrate Stack Overflow for a week rather than a day.

How can I help get the word out?

Join your local community (or create a new community location) on meetup.com/stackoverflow. Once you’re a member, help us get the rest of the Stack Exchange tech community involved! Use your existing online activity to share details about this event:

  • Use the hashtag #SOMeetup on Google Plus, Twitter, Flickr and YouTube when posting about Stack Overflow Meetups
  • Post a link to your local Meetup page on Google Plus, Facebook, and Twitter, email the page to your friends, promote in blog posts, on HN, etc
  • Use the custom Stack Overflow Meetup widgets
  • Get in touch with other existing tech Meetup groups in your area and see if there are Stack Exchange users among them


How will Stack Exchange help?

We’re dedicated to the success of these Meetups just as much as you are. We’ll be posting more tips here on our blog to make sure you’re well-prepared to host an awesome event. We’ll put ads on our network to help spread the word, and we’ll share event details via our own social media platforms. We’ll send door prizes to the groups that build up the biggest following leading up to the Meetup Day. We’ll collect your stories, tweets, and photos to share on our blog after the event.

 

* For those of you who aren’t programmers, hackers or designers – fear not! We haven’t forgotten you; stay tuned for news of a possible network-wide event later this year.

Respect the community – your own, and others’

03-22-12 by Shog9. 13 comments

In “Why Can’t You Have Just One Site?” Jeff wrote about the rationale for creating three sites instead of one, and the process for determining where a question belongs:

Is it really so hard to figure out which community you belong to, and thus, where your question belongs? Ask yourself this:

  • what is your job title?
  • which community do you consider yourself a part of?
  • what are you trying to accomplish?

You can use the same mountain to go downhill really fast on snow — but it’s plainly evident to the participant which culture they consider themselves a part of, “skiers” or “snowboarders”.

We’ve since grown from a Trilogy to a network of 84 sites. Our audience is large enough to allow a considerable amount of specialization: Apple, Ubuntu, WordPress and Database Administrators all cover topics that previously belonged on Super User, Stack Overflow or Server Fault. But the same philosophy still applies: before you can decide where to ask, you need to know who to ask. And who you ask will depend (at least in part) on who you are…

That’s the philosophy. Putting it into practice creates a few wrinkles: some sites have overlapping communities; some sites are named after their audience, but the name doesn’t quite match up to how the community actually sees themselves; in some cases, the community is defined purely by a topic of interest and not any particular occupation or field. These ambiguities lead to some undesirable behaviors:

  • Cross posting: technically multi-posting, asking the same question verbatim on different sites without tailoring it to that site’s audience.
  • Scope Gerrymandering: attempting to micromanage what’s on-topic in order to avoid overlap with other sites or simply drive away users seen as undesirable.
  • Migration hot potato: kicking a question around from site to site until one of them finally accepts it.

Over time, these conflicts tend to work themselves out: a community may form around a topic or shared interest, but soon develops into something more than that. No one would mistake Ask Ubuntu for Unix and Linux. The types of questions and answers on Programmers or Ask Different will show you at a glance that you’re not on Stack Overflow or Super User. Spending a few minutes looking around before you post – or reading the site’s FAQ – should tell you all you need to know about what questions belong there, and how the community expects them to be asked. There’s no substitute for taking the time to get to know the locals.

With that in mind, here are a few strategies for avoiding these problems as a member of a young Stack Exchange site:

Respecting your own community

As members of a community, your first loyalty should be to that community. When evaluating a question, you shouldn’t be looking to push it off on some other site; instead, ask if it could be appropriate and on-topic for you, the experts who the author decided to ask. Be a bit jealous of your site – don’t blithely turn askers away simply because their question could be asked somewhere else. Don’t hit them over the head with your scope, help them tailor their question to fit into it – and if that means your site’s scope overlaps a bit with another site’s, so be it.

Obviously, there are questions you’ll have to turn away, either because their only connection to your site is via the audience (“How do I make bread as a programmer?”), because it’s completely off-topic (“How do I cook a fish in a dishwasher?” obviously belongs on Cooking, not Home Improvement) or because they’re simply not useful or constructive. But that should be your last resort. Close questions with an eye toward improvement and re-opening, not driving users away.

Respecting other communities

The migration tool was created to help those unfortunate users who asked good questions on the wrong site. Do your best to remember this, whether as a user (flagging or voting to close) or as a moderator (responding to flags).

  • Don’t migrate poorly-asked or non-constructive questions. Just close them. If you want to help the asker out by recommending a site where their question would be on-topic, go ahead – but also recommend they read that site’s FAQ first!
  • Do leave comments on questions that might get better answers somewhere else. The good folks on English Language and Usage might well be able to give the history of some bit of technical jargon, but if you think that question would get a better answer on the site dedicated to the field where that jargon is used – suggest that! If the asker is unhappy with the answers he got, he’ll have a ready source of better ones. Ditto for unanswered questions gathering cobwebs.
  • Along the same lines, don’t attempt to scavenge on-topic questions from other sites by asking the moderators there to migrate them to yours. Again, there’s no harm in leaving a comment suggesting that a question would be a better fit somewhere else. But focus on the questions that aren’t on-topic, or aren’t getting answered – snatching someone’s question (or answer) away without any forewarning is a slap in their face.
  • Finally, be extremely reluctant to migrate old, answered questions. The votes and answers on these reflect the opinions and work of the community where they originated, and in most cases they’ll be somewhat out of place elsewhere – you want your greatest hits to reflect the best that your community has to offer, not someone else’s. And, again, the migration can come across as rude: if someone has invested serious effort into an answer and has linked to it on their blog or from their résumé, then snatching it from them without due consideration won’t endear them to you. Only migrate these questions when the alternative is deletion.

The Stack Exchange software has grown to be extremely powerful, but it’s important to remember that, at their core, these sites run on human beings – and without respect for each other, clever tools solve nothing.