site title

Topic: community

Respect the community – your own, and others’

03-22-12 by Shog9. 13 comments

In “Why Can’t You Have Just One Site?” Jeff wrote about the rationale for creating three sites instead of one, and the process for determining where a question belongs:

Is it really so hard to figure out which community you belong to, and thus, where your question belongs? Ask yourself this:

  • what is your job title?
  • which community do you consider yourself a part of?
  • what are you trying to accomplish?

You can use the same mountain to go downhill really fast on snow — but it’s plainly evident to the participant which culture they consider themselves a part of, “skiers” or “snowboarders”.

We’ve since grown from a Trilogy to a network of 84 sites. Our audience is large enough to allow a considerable amount of specialization: Apple, Ubuntu, WordPress and Database Administrators all cover topics that previously belonged on Super User, Stack Overflow or Server Fault. But the same philosophy still applies: before you can decide where to ask, you need to know who to ask. And who you ask will depend (at least in part) on who you are…

That’s the philosophy. Putting it into practice creates a few wrinkles: some sites have overlapping communities; some sites are named after their audience, but the name doesn’t quite match up to how the community actually sees themselves; in some cases, the community is defined purely by a topic of interest and not any particular occupation or field. These ambiguities lead to some undesirable behaviors:

  • Cross posting: technically multi-posting, asking the same question verbatim on different sites without tailoring it to that site’s audience.
  • Scope Gerrymandering: attempting to micromanage what’s on-topic in order to avoid overlap with other sites or simply drive away users seen as undesirable.
  • Migration hot potato: kicking a question around from site to site until one of them finally accepts it.

Over time, these conflicts tend to work themselves out: a community may form around a topic or shared interest, but soon develops into something more than that. No one would mistake Ask Ubuntu for Unix and Linux. The types of questions and answers on Programmers or Ask Different will show you at a glance that you’re not on Stack Overflow or Super User. Spending a few minutes looking around before you post – or reading the site’s FAQ – should tell you all you need to know about what questions belong there, and how the community expects them to be asked. There’s no substitute for taking the time to get to know the locals.

With that in mind, here are a few strategies for avoiding these problems as a member of a young Stack Exchange site:

Respecting your own community

As members of a community, your first loyalty should be to that community. When evaluating a question, you shouldn’t be looking to push it off on some other site; instead, ask if it could be appropriate and on-topic for you, the experts who the author decided to ask. Be a bit jealous of your site – don’t blithely turn askers away simply because their question could be asked somewhere else. Don’t hit them over the head with your scope, help them tailor their question to fit into it – and if that means your site’s scope overlaps a bit with another site’s, so be it.

Obviously, there are questions you’ll have to turn away, either because their only connection to your site is via the audience (“How do I make bread as a programmer?”), because it’s completely off-topic (“How do I cook a fish in a dishwasher?” obviously belongs on Cooking, not Home Improvement) or because they’re simply not useful or constructive. But that should be your last resort. Close questions with an eye toward improvement and re-opening, not driving users away.

Respecting other communities

The migration tool was created to help those unfortunate users who asked good questions on the wrong site. Do your best to remember this, whether as a user (flagging or voting to close) or as a moderator (responding to flags).

  • Don’t migrate poorly-asked or non-constructive questions. Just close them. If you want to help the asker out by recommending a site where their question would be on-topic, go ahead – but also recommend they read that site’s FAQ first!
  • Do leave comments on questions that might get better answers somewhere else. The good folks on English Language and Usage might well be able to give the history of some bit of technical jargon, but if you think that question would get a better answer on the site dedicated to the field where that jargon is used – suggest that! If the asker is unhappy with the answers he got, he’ll have a ready source of better ones. Ditto for unanswered questions gathering cobwebs.
  • Along the same lines, don’t attempt to scavenge on-topic questions from other sites by asking the moderators there to migrate them to yours. Again, there’s no harm in leaving a comment suggesting that a question would be a better fit somewhere else. But focus on the questions that aren’t on-topic, or aren’t getting answered – snatching someone’s question (or answer) away without any forewarning is a slap in their face.
  • Finally, be extremely reluctant to migrate old, answered questions. The votes and answers on these reflect the opinions and work of the community where they originated, and in most cases they’ll be somewhat out of place elsewhere – you want your greatest hits to reflect the best that your community has to offer, not someone else’s. And, again, the migration can come across as rude: if someone has invested serious effort into an answer and has linked to it on their blog or from their résumé, then snatching it from them without due consideration won’t endear them to you. Only migrate these questions when the alternative is deletion.

The Stack Exchange software has grown to be extremely powerful, but it’s important to remember that, at their core, these sites run on human beings – and without respect for each other, clever tools solve nothing.

Reputation and Historical Archives

03-05-12 by Shog9. 20 comments

If you’ve been around Meta Stack Overflow the past few days, you’ve seen a fair bit of conversation sparked by the recent changes to how reputation is calculated:

To be clear: reputation values are not changing, every action in the system is still worth the same amount. Here’s what will be different:

  • Your reputation will be correct at all times
  • Deletions will have a much more immediate effect on reputation, not waiting on a recalc (but reputation sync takes up to 5 minutes on a delete/undelete action; as to not block the user’s response thread, it’s offloaded to a background queue)
  • Recalcs will no longer be necessary
  • Up/Down vote reversals will restore the correct reputation amount
  • Up/Down vote reversals will correctly adjust to the reputation cap
  • The reputation history in your profile will be more detailed and accurate (e.g. when a post is deleted, you’ll see that in the reputation tab of your profile)

This may sound pretty boring – and it is – but it’s a big deal for some of our most avid users, for whom that number at the top of the screen is an at-a-glance indicator of how their contributions are faring on the site. Up until now, the reputation visible next to your name on your profile was a rough aproximation of your real reputation – only a recalculation would resolve all the discrepancies that crept in over time.

Unfortunately, we botched what should have been a much-welcomed roll out for this feature. See that last bullet quoted above? The one about deleted posts? Anyone who’s been on Stack Overflow for a while has at least a few deleted posts attached to their reputation history, especially those of us who participated early on when exact details of what Stack Overflow is were still being hammered out. Questions that weren’t really questions, answers to one of the many polls or Getting To Know You threads that sprung up, things that were reasonably normal at one time but have since been deleted as we’ve become more focused, or even just information that became obsolete as technologies changed. Deletion is a critical part of the site’s question lifecycle – as Jeff wrote recently,

We know that closing the cookie jar is painful. We feel your pain. Nobody likes having their fun taken away. But it’s too addictive and too easy, and in the absence of any moderation, the community would do nothing but add and upvote the easy, fun stuff.

And nothing makes you feel that pain quite like reminding you of it with a bright red line every time you visit your profile:

As you can see in that screenshot, there’s an actual link to the deleted answer – this is the first time we’ve made that information available! And the response to it was immediate: folks went through their histories, looked at all the deleted questions and answers, and found a bunch of stuff that, while not strictly compliant with current practices on Stack Overflow, probably shouldn’t have been deleted.

In short, fixing one bug (inaccurate reputation history) exposed several others (a flawed deletion process and a lack of respect for important past contributions) and created a new one (humiliating display of reputation on deleted questions).

So after much discussion on Meta Stack Overflow as to how this should be handled, we came up with the following four fixes:

First, if you’ve contributed something worthwhile to the site, you should keep the reputation for that even if it eventually gets deleted. “Worthwhile” here is defined as,

  • A score of 3 or greater
  • Visible on the site for at least 60 days

In fast-changing professions, there should be no shame in contributing valuable information just because it eventually goes out of date – and there shouldn’t be a penalty for deleting it when it does. Naturally, editing to bring an answer up-to-date is preferable – but if someone else already posted a good answer with current information, you should be able to remove yours and keep the reward for the time it was useful.

Second, we won’t display reputation lost to deleted questions on your profile unless you explicitly ask for it, and won’t display it at all to other people (apart from moderators). This was an egregious privacy violation, and we sincerely apologize for not catching it sooner.

Third, it should be easier for the community to both delete AND undelete most questions. Previously, it could take hundreds of votes to remove some of these extremely popular questions – that sounds good, but in practice it just meant folks gave up voting and asked moderators to delete for them. Creating more grief for moderators and less democracy was never the intention – from here on out, it will take at least three and at most 10 votes to delete even the most popular questions, and an equivalent number to undelete them.

Last but not least, we’re experimenting with ways to keep some of the more useful – or even just fun – questions from the site’s history accessible in some way. To be clear: most of these are not great examples of questions that should be asked today… But some of them are, quite frankly, brilliant – and losing them entirely just because they aren’t a good fit for our strict Q&A format is wrong. For now, we’ve provided a “Historical Artifact” lock that completely freezes a question and its answers, preventing all further editing, voting, answering, and flagging. It will also remove it from the usual lists of questions on the site while allowing it to remain fully accessible and visible to everyone with a link to it. At the moment, this is a completely manual and moderator-only feature: depending on how it works out, we’ll tweak and expand it as time goes on.

These changes are currently in the process of being tested and rolled out across all sites. Please report any bugs on Meta Stack Overflow.

The Trouble With Popularity

01-31-12 by Jeff Atwood. 50 comments

Way back in 2008, we had Alexis Ohanian and Steve Huffman, the founders and co-creators of Reddit, on the Stack Overflow podcast. We chatted about a bunch of stuff, but one of the things they said that always stuck with me was that Reddit always took an explicitly hands-off, no moderation approach to their content from the very beginning.

I found that a bit shocking, since I’ve… never seen that work. Certainly on Stack Overflow and Stack Exchange we are very much pro-moderation — and more so with every passing year. We have literally hundreds of community moderators. We spend a ton of time appointing and electing moderators, as well as conducting weekly moderator chats in the Teacher’s Lounge chatroom, and emailing all our mods a monthly moderator newsletter.

The Reddit founders maintained that evil things which require active moderation didn’t happen too often, provided you build the right kind of community voting and flagging mechanisms. I can agree with that. We’ve found that to be true on Stack Exchange as well. It’s almost enough to make you a believer in the fundamental goodness of human beings.

Almost.

But there’s a deeper, more insidious problem that creeps into systems when the community is unmoderated. Stuff like, say, compilable James Bond Java ASCII art

… or mountain-climbing Skyrim horses and wounded Skyrim NPCs with vivid imaginations.

Let us not forget the classics, either:

… and so, so many more.

These sorts of posts are wildly popular with the community. The cartoon question alone had over a million views by our extremely strict view counter — which easily translates to at least two million views, possibly three million. We don’t hate fun here, but we discovered that these posts become so popular over time that they truly start to drown out everything else on the site.

Ironically, the Reddit community itself now recognizes that moderation is fundamental and essential:

One thing thing that does concern me, however, is that [as this subreddit gets more popular] the amount of image macros, memes, rage comics and generally low-quality content hitting the front page has grown to annoying proportions.

The problem with image macros and rage comics (besides generally lacking wit or anything genuinely insightful) is that they’re quick and easy to digest, and thus tend to get upvoted faster than self posts and actual discussions which take thought and time before an appropriate response can meted out. If you’re not careful you end up with something akin to /r/gaming, which is now a burbling, deformed wreck of its former self, with anything remotely resembling intelligent discussion being buried under a sea of vacuous meme-repetition.

In my view what this subreddit needs is a touch more moderation to ensure that we don’t end up with a front page full of imgur/memegenerator links, and that people who want to use this subreddit as a medium to discuss the [topic] can do so without having to sift through the crap with a shovel.

This is as clear a call for active moderation as I’ve ever seen. And the moderators, to their credit, took charge and instituted changes to help guide their community away from the fatty junk food content:

We’ve heard your concerns over the direction the community is heading. We were hoping we could ride it out and things would balance themselves, but it just isn’t working, and things need to change. It’s plain to see that meme-based content attracts many upvotes, and we all love a good laugh, but it is not what we want this community to be. But this isn’t just about memes, it’s about the general tone of the community. We’re making changes to our rules for posting, commenting, and voting here — necessary changes to make [this] the community we first envisioned.

This community is for sharing thought-provoking stories, high-level tactics discussions, videos/images of the awesomeness of [topic], suggestions or discussions on mechanics, and it can all be done without resorting to memes or complaining. Reddit never ceases to amaze, I expect to be surprised! If you have any questions, message the mods! We hope you agree and understand these changes.

We know that closing the cookie jar is painful. We feel your pain. Nobody likes having their fun taken away. But it’s too addictive and too easy, and in the absence of any moderation, the community would do nothing but add and upvote the easy, fun stuff.

This is why community moderators have real power; they need that power to intervene, educate, and refocus the community’s exuberance on more substantive content. People will fight you almost literally to the death over their right to be entertained, and to entertain others:

Why can’t you just not look at these fun posts? Why do they have to be deleted? You guys suck!

The same reason the moderators and community on that subreddit didn’t decide to “not look” at the fun posts, really:

  1. Broken windows. Every ‘fun’ post users see is an open invitation for them to participate in the fun by adding their own fun question or answer. The stuff spreads like kudzu! Pretty soon the entire site is overrun with nothing but that kind of fun. And even if you grandfather a few in, you’ll enjoy neverending requests asking why their fun question or answer has to be removed, while this one over here is allowed to remain.

  2. Opportunity cost. Every minute spent participating in an entertaining ‘fun’ post is time that someone could have spent asking or answering a substantive question, something practical that solves an actual problem for hundreds or thousands of people. Entertainment, within reason, is by no means a bad thing — but I experience almost physical pain when I think about a brilliant topic expert spending 10 minutes on one of our sites deciding which hilarious cartoon is their favorite.

Popularity is a tough thing. I’m tempted to call it a curse, but what we try to do at Stack Exchange is make sure that questions and answers are popular for the right reasons — because they are amazing resources for learning from your peers. If you want to slip a few jokes in there with the learning, that’s fine, but when the question devolves into little more than entertainment, I hope you can understand why our community moderators are obliged to step in and protect the community from, well … itself.

Stack Exchange Data Explorer 2.0

01-15-12 by Sam Saffron. 4 comments

It has been a year and a half since we launched Data Explorer. In the past few months Tim Stone (on a community grant) and I have pushed a major round of changes. Thanks Tim!

Recap on last years changes

Since we publicly launched data explorer, the most notable change contributed back from the community was support for query plans, big thanks to Justin for submitting the patch.

We also added quite a few bug fixes/features, mostly around merging users. Some features were added to defend data.se against an onslaught of public queries. A few features were added to support non Stack Exchange data dumps, most notably a system for white listing. Our very own Rebecca Chernoff ported Data Explorer to ASP.NET MVC3 amongst many other fixes.

The current round of changes offers some very cool new functionality, which is worth listing:

Query revisions

When we created Data Explorer there was no way to track a query’s “lineage”. This was particularly problematic because we had no way of updating featured queries or shared queries. Even I complained about this on meta.

The new pipeline works just like Gist, you can track the history of your query as you are editing (attributing the various editors along the way):


You can link to a specific revision, or simply share a “query set” by using the permalink. By sharing a “query set” you can later on fix up any issues the query has, without needing to update the link. The new pipeline allows you to “fork” any query created by other users and tracks attribution along the way.

Graphs

We added some basic graphing facilities, supporting 2 types of line graphs:

The first type is a simple graph, where the first column represents the X-axis and the other columns the data points. For example: a graph of questions and answers per month.

The second type is a bit trickier, it unpivots the second column in the result set. For example: a graph of questions per tag for top 10 tags.

Huge open source upgrade

Data Explorer consumes a fair amount of open source libraries. In the past year and a half many have evolved. We took the time to upgrade them all.

The excellent Code Mirror was updated to the 2.0 version, the new version no longer uses messy iframes. Marjin wrote a great post explaining the changes, a fantastic read for any JavaScript developers.

SlickGrid, which in my opinion is the best grid control built on jQuery, was upgraded to version infinity.

100% more Dapper

Dapper our open source micro ORM is the only ORM Data Explorer uses. We took the time to port the entire solution to Dapper. I even added a few CRUD helpers so you are not stuck hard coding INSERT and UPDATE statements everywhere.

Data Explorer is a good open source example of how we code web sites at Stack Overflow. It is built on our stack using many of our helpers. Dapper and related helpers are used for data access. It uses the same homebrew migration system we use in production and an interesting asset packaging system I wrote (for the record, Ben wrote a much more awesome one that we use in production, lobby him to get it blogged). It also uses MiniProfiler for profiling. MiniProfiler is even enabled in production, so go have a play.

Lots of smaller less notable fixes

  • We now have a concept of “user preferences”, so we can remember which tab you selected, etc.
  • We remember the page you were at and try to redirect you there after you log on.
  • We attribute the query properly to the creator / editor from the query show page.
  • You can page through your queries on your user page.
  • Support for arbitrary hyperlinks
  • Revamped object browser, you can collapse table definitions
  • Lots of other stuff I forgot :)

You too can run Data Explorer

At Stack Exchange we run 3 different instances of Data Explorer. We have the public Data Explorer and a couple of private instances we use to explore other data sets. The first private instance is used for raw site database access. The other is used to browse through our haproxy logs.

There is nothing forcing you to point Data Explorer at a Stack Exchange data dump, the vast majority of the features work fine pointed at an arbitrary database.

Hope you enjoy this round of changes.

If there are any bugs or feature requests please post them to Meta Stack Overflow. Data Explorer is open source, patches welcome.

Stack Exchange API V2.0 Public Beta

12-26-11 by Kevin Montrose. 7 comments

More than a year and a half ago we unveiled the first version of the Stack Exchange API to the wider world.  Since then we’ve had a minor point release, improved app and script listing, and shared some statistics about the consumers of our API.

I’ve been pretty pleased with version 1.1, stackexchange.com and our chat software make extensive use of it, there are a good number of useful applications listed, and a couple of parties are pulling interesting statistics out using it.  It’s been a success, but the shine’s definitely come off; there are some use cases we didn’t support, some missing features, and just some plain-old mistakes.

That’s why I’m pleased to announce…

The public beta for Version 2.0 of the Stack Exchange API

We’ve been consuming this internally for a bit, and a rather low-key private beta has been going on for the last few weeks.  With any luck we’ve flushed out any really bad bugs and functional deficiencies.

If you want to hop right in, go take a look at the documentation and then register an app.

Just like last time, we’re running a contest to encourage some applications that exercise the sweet new features in V2.0.

First Prize

For the most awesome application, you’ll get an iPad 2.

Second Prize

Second place will get an Acer Aspire One.

Third Prize

For third place, a 160 GB Intel SSD.

Library

We’ve tried to make the API easy to understand and use, we’re aware of the great advantages of wrapping some complexity away in a library.  Building an awesome library makes it easier for future developers to get up and running against our API.

The author of the best library will get a Kindle Fire.

Bug Reports

Even if you don’t have any app ideas, and can’t afford to invest the time needed in building a full library, you can still participate in the contest.  Each bug you find makes the API a little bit better for the rest of the community.

Those who we feel have contributed substantially to the quality of the API with their bug reports will get to choose between a Kindle Touch 3G, or a Lilliput Mini USB Monitor.

 

The Rules

  • Contest open to every man, woman, and child on planet Earth, except those men, women, or children living in places where contests like this are somehow illegal.
  • Only applications and libraries/wrappers listed on the apps tab of stackapps.com are eligible for consideration.
  • The application or library/wrapper must be written using our API, and work against all of our sites.
  • Libraries must expose all available methods in the API in some fashion.  I’d advise comprehensive examples to make it clear you’ve covered everything.
  • While we do have a prize to recognize the best library/wrapper, to be eligible for the first 3 prizes you must build an application.
  • If you live in an area of the world where it is logistically impossible for us to get your prize to you — like, say, because your nearest Apple retailer is 3000 nautical miles away — we’ll make something work.
  • Your app must work against the final, 2.0 released version of the API.  The “beta” moniker will have come off the API before the contest ends.
  • If your app depends on an app store for distribution, you must have some way of getting the app to us to judge if it is not yet approved when the contest ends.  We’ll contact you to get a copy, but you’ve got to get our notice first so put some real effort into your Stack Apps post.

We’ll be judging apps based on how awesome and useful we, the rapidly increasing employees of Stack Exchange, find them.

The library prize will be chosen by the development team, and who knows we may pull it into our projects (as Stacky, the previous winner, was into stackexchange.com).  While we don’t care about platform, we do care about documentation and examples, so make yours exemplary.

The bug report prizes will be sent to anyone we feel went above and beyond in finding bugs in the API, there’s no limit to the number of people who may win.

All entries must be listed on Stack Apps by 11:59 PM UTC February 29th, 2012, we’ll be judging entries in the first few weeks of March and announcing winners subsequently.