site title

Topic: community

Please welcome Jon Ericson, Community Manager

08-09-13 by Shog9. 32 comments

With over 100 sites on various and sundry topics, Stack Exchange has become something of a juggernaught: keeping this many different communities healthy and well-supported can be a bit overwhelming at times. We’d never be able to pull it off if there weren’t so many of you pitching in to help, and so I’m more than happy to announce that we’ve managed to convert another dedicated volunteer to full-time cat-wrangler:

Jon Ericson

Jon became fascinated with computers when he got to play with his cousin’s Commodore 64 circa 1986. Over the years, Jon went on to write many fine Hello World programs, and dabbled in one online community after another: BBSes, AOL forums, Usenet, mailing lists, etc.

Jon has had an interesting relationship with Stack Exchange. Five years ago, he read about the Stack Overflow beta and signed up. A year and a half later, after asking and answering a respectable number of questions, Jon lost interest. That could have ended the story, but when the network expanded to topics outside of technology Stack Exchange’s not-so-secret sauce of voting, editing, focused Q&A, and, yes, reputation dragged him back in. Jon got involved in a few more beta sites, and his renewed interest was solidified by several amazing answers to his Bible questions.

Jon’s always been active in supporting the development of the communities he’s a part of, debating policies and suggesting improvements going all the way back to the User Voice days on Stack Overflow. For a long time, Jon didn’t see the point in closing questions and deleting posts (indeed, he once wrote a (long!) answer titled, “Closing Questions Considered Harmful”) after all, it wasn’t like disk space was too expensive. But after years of getting great answers from people who knew their stuff, the idea finally clicked: it wasn’t disk space, but the time of great participants that is at a premium. This sort of knowledge gained from experience has proved instrumental in helping Jon to provide guidance to folks using Stack Exchange for the first time.

Just about every minute Jon isn’t online is a minute he spends with family: his wife, ten-year-old son, and boy/girl twins born in January. They enjoy camping, reading, playing games, travel, and church.

Jon has repeatedly impressed us with his ability to analyze a situation and produce thoughtful, well-reasoned advice – we’re looking forward to seeing him bring this skill to bear on the various challenges facing the network.


Do you have the talent and experience to manage the communities on Stack Exchange? We’re always looking for more help, and would love to hear from you – whether you’re near our NYC HQ or anywhere else in the world. You get to work with awesome people like Jon and help us guide Stack Exchange as it grows. (And on the off-chance you’re fluent in Japanese, you should definitely apply – we have a special project for you…)

Welcome Tim Post, our latest Community Manager

05-31-13 by Shog9. 19 comments

Community management at Stack Exchange is an… Interesting job. Parts sociologist, cat-wrangler, therapist, software analyst and cheerleader, this small band of dedicated people work daily to make sure each individual community has the tools and support you need to be as awesome as you are. Of course, we don’t do it alone: from the very start, Stack Exchange attracted some amazingly helpful and insightful folk who’ve donated their time and effort to help out – and I’m pleased to announce that we’re adding one of them, Tim Post, to our full-time staff of Community Managers.

Tim comes from a systems programming background, starting out way back in the dial-up BBS days. He’s been working with and managing communities of various sizes ever since, and describes finding Stack Overflow back in the winter of ’08 like “getting stuck in a huge spiderweb”. His fascination with the system itself (both the software and the game-like aspect that drives so much participation here) led him to become a moderator, first on Webmasters then on Stack Overflow in the spring of ’11. Since then, he’s been a constant help and guide to the many folks using Stack Overflow and Stack Exchange.

When he’s not working, Tim still enjoys programming (nowadays simply to satisfy his whims), photography, DIY projects and tinkering with whatever he can get his hands on. He resides in the Philippines, thus extending the reach of our global team into the west Pacific.

Tim’s been working with us on a trial basis for a little while now, and enjoyed our motley crew enough to sign on full-time. You’ll be seeing a lot more of him in the coming months, so please give him a warm welcome when he drops in on your site.


Think you have what it takes to manage the communities on Stack Exchange? We’re hiring community managers, and if you’re not near our NYC HQ, that’s okay – we love remote workers. You get to work with awesome people like Tim and help us guide Stack Exchange as it grows. (And on the off-chance you’re fluent in Portuguese, you should definitely apply – we have a special project for you…)

VOTE NOW in the 2013 Stack Overflow Moderator Election

03-08-13 by Shog9. 9 comments

It’s time once again to cast your vote for the next Stack Overflow moderators. The primaries have just ended, and the top ten candidates can be found here: http://stackoverflow.com/election.

Why more moderators?

We’re running the election now (rather than a year from the last election in June) because veteran moderator Tim Post is stepping down in order to work with us as a Community Manager! While we’re extremely lucky to have his hard-working brilliance brought to bear on the problems we face managing all these sites, his transition does create an immediate need for a replacement on the SO mod team.

But of course, we’d be running an election soon anyway; as amazing as the current Stack Overflow moderators are, the workload continues to grow:

What moderators do

Jeff laid out the basic philosophy in A Theory of Moderation:

Moderators are human exception handlers, there to deal with those (hopefully rare) exceptional conditions that should not normally happen, but when they do, they can bring your entire community to a screaming halt — if you don’t have human exception handling in place.

As the previous graph indicates, flags – the primary embodiment of those exceptions – are a fairly frequent occurrence on Stack Overflow, purely because of its size. That said, a lot of flags aren’t identifying things that are particularly exceptional: in particular, posts that need to be closed (duplicates, off-topic questions, etc) or are of extremely poor quality aren’t all that uncommon on a site that gets over 7000 new questions and 11K answers each day. While moderators are well-equipped to handle these quickly, they don’t actually require moderators when a sufficient number of experienced users are willing and able to help.

The effects of improved community moderation tools

I mentioned last year that we were working on tools that would help to distribute the load more evenly between the elected moderators and the community as a whole. Well, eight months after their introduction, I’m happy to report that the revamped Review system is doing exactly that:

As Jeff wrote:

We designed the Stack Exchange network engine to be mostly self-regulating, in that we amortize the overall moderation cost of the system across thousands of teeny-tiny slices of effort contributed by regular, everyday users.

That’s not empty rhetoric – on a site the size of Stack Overflow, it’s absolutely essential. Geoff Dalgas came up with the design for the new review system based on his observations of wikiHow’s Community Dashboard: individual tasks, each focused on a specific need with specific actions to be taken and specific guidance provided for new users. The philosophy: don’t just give people stuff to do – help them learn how to do it.

Geoff, Emmett and Kevin have done some amazing work in making these new tools as fast and effective as possible; while there have been some growing pains and a few unexpected challenges, it’s great to see folks jumping in to help so enthusiastically. In the past 30 days, we’ve seen:

(a detailed breakdown of actions to first posts and late answers can be found here.)

That’s a lot of work being done by a lot of people… Heady stuff. To be sure, that still leaves a huge amount of work for elected moderators, but I think it demonstrates the ability of the whole community to step up and assist when the opportunity is provided, that thousands of you are still willing and able to work together to created and maintain the site that you want to be a part of.

So as you go to cast your votes today, looking over each candidate’s stats and reflecting on what they’d do as a moderator… Remember that moderation doesn’t start with winning an election.

2012 Stack Overflow User Survey Results

01-25-13 by Bethany Marzewski. 42 comments

In December, we launched our 3rd annual Stack Overflow Annual User Survey to learn more about our site demographics and user trends throughout 2012. Compared to last year, we received an even larger sample size this year with almost 10,000 respondents!

Here are a few larger trends we’ve observed over the past three years:

You like us…you really like us!

Since 2009, site traffic to Stack Overflow has grown by a whopping 261.7%! As if this weren’t enough, we’re also now the 86th largest global site, according to Alexa. Our crazy goal of breaking into the top 50 is looking less crazy!

Mobile is on the move.

No real surprise here, but of the mobile family, the number of users who own Android devices increased 29.2% from 2010 to 2012—a bigger increase than owners of iPhones and iPads combined. Despite the rising mobile trend, we were surprised to learn that only 7.7% of you are employed as mobile apps developers and 51.8% of companies still don’t have a mobile app.

You’re getting happier at work.

Since 2010, we’ve seen a 2.2% uptick in workplace satisfaction, so 70% of you are happy in your current jobs. We’re not going to point fingers or anything, but we hope there may be some causation for those of you who found your current job from among the 10,000+ roles that were posted on Careers 2.0 last year.

Since we now have three years’ worth of data, we wanted to put together something a little special for this year’s overview, so check out the infographic below that our designer created to highlight some of our key findings.

In our effort to make all information publicly available, here is a basic report of the results or if you’d prefer to play around with the data yourself, just email alison@stackoverflow.com for the dataset.

 

UPDATED: Check out our European version of the infographic here.

Join the Stack Exchange team – we’re hiring!

10-01-12 by David Fullerton. 11 comments

We’re growing like crazy! Between launching exciting new sites, developing new features and promotions for existing ones, and branching out geographically, Stack Exchange can use all the help it can get – so we’re currently hiring for seven (7!) different positions, from developers to designers to sales to… well, just look at the list yourself:

We’re dogfooding Careers for these of course, since who better to help make the software running Stack Exchange more awesome than the folks using Stack Exchange. Here are a few positions that are especially appropriate to our community:

Product Manager – Q&A Team (telecommute or New York)

We’re looking for someone to help us design and build the next set of features and special projects for Stack Exchange.  We want someone with serious startup experience building and shipping products, from conception to deployment.  You’ll take ideas from us and the community, or come up with your own, and work with our designers and developers to get them shipped.

Web Developer – Q&A Team (telecommute or New York)

We’re looking for a top-notch web developer for the Core Q&A team.  You’ll work directly on the engine that powers all the sites to ship new features, fix bugs, and scale and grow the sites.  We want someone with serious front-to-back web development experience (C# not required), a track record of getting stuff done, and a history of activity in the community.

Web Developer – Careers Team (New York)

We’re looking for more top-notch web developers to work on building Careers into the best place for developers to find a job, anywhere.  You’ll work on lots of new features, fix bugs, and help us decide the future of Careers.  We want someone with serious front-to-back web development experience (C# not required), a track record of getting stuff done, and a history of activity in the community.

Senior Systems Administrator (telecommute or New York)

We’re looking for a veteran Windows / Linux systems administrator to join our team.  You’ll help build out our infrastructure and keep it ahead of the growth curve.  We want someone with experience working with both Windows and Linux systems (emphasis on Windows), and a track record of taking on big challenges and delivering blog-worthy solutions.

Product Designer (telecommute or New York)

Last, but not least, we need a product designer.  You’ll work with Jin to help our developers and product managers design new features, create and implement full brand identities for new Stack Exchange sites, and help improve user experience across the network.  We want someone with a portfolio of web design and experience working directly with developers and product managers to design products and features.

Telecommute?

Most of these positions are open to the world: we want to hire the best people, wherever they are.  However, there are a few things you should be aware of:

  1. You should be awesome at working remotely — self-motivated and aggressively communicative — to make sure you stay on the same page as the rest of your team
  2. We still believe in getting teams together at least once a week to talk, and that generally happens between 1 – 5pm EDT.  You’ll need to be flexible with your hours
  3. There may be some countries that are legally too difficult for us to work with…sorry!

A few positions are in-office only, but don’t worry: we have awesome offices.  In fact, a few people who started working remotely moved to New York just to get access to our catered lunches.  If you do want to move to New York (or our sales offices in Denver or London), we’ll assist you with relocation but you must already have the permanent right to work in the country of the office (US or UK).

Apply!

Each job has instructions to apply, and we’re hiring immediately.  If you see a job that might be a fit for you or someone you know, apply soon.  You can also always find a list of open positions at http://stackexchange.com/about/hiring, or click the “jobs” link in the footer of any Stack Exchange site.