site title

Topic: community

JNat and animuson: workin’ on ur problemz

04-22-15 by Abby T. Miller. 26 comments

The Community Team’s first and most important job is to help you, the users. Every day, we hang out on meta sites and in chat, watching to make sure that someone is working on your problems. Until very recently, community managers also fielded each and every request that came through our support ticketing system.

(And before that, Jeff Atwood handled them all. The whole team@ inbox, singlehandedly.)

Our approach to customer service via email has changed as the network has grown: we’ve tried many new processes and tools over the years to help community managers handle team@ efficiently and still have brainpower left over for the rest of their jobs. (If you’re curious about it, you can take a look at Jon Ericson’s ongoing blog series.) But still, support tickets stack up and all too often lose out to more pressing issues on the sites themselves; more and more often, we found ourselves struggling to resolve problems as they came in, much less fix them in two ways.

Some companies respond to this problem by just giving up, hiding support emails and shunting requests into a poorly-monitored forum somewhere. We know this because we’ve repeatedly gotten emails from members of such sites, from people searching desperately to find anyone willing to help. But we don’t believe in treating our users – the people whose patronage we depend on – as annoyances to be brushed off and forgotten. So we decided to double down on our commitment to friendly and efficient user support: we’ve hired two new staff members to handle email support full-time. And we hired them from the communities they will be supporting.

Please join me in welcoming our two new Community Growth Operations Specialists

Kyle, aka animuson:

profile for animuson

Kyle was an elected moderator on Stack Overflow, spending a significant amount of his time helping out others on the site. Some personal background:

  • He visited Australia for 18 days as a student, which is probably longer than you’ve ever spent in Australia (unless you live there);
  • He plays an obsessive amount (his words) of video games, and has over 100 platinum trophies on the PlayStation Network;
  • He previously worked at his county’s Election Commission, which is (unintuitively) the most non-political job one can have.

João, aka JNat:

profile for JNat

João was a pro tempore moderator on Anime & Manga SE, contributing greatly to the health and growth of that community. Some personal background:

  • He studied Arts in high school and has a masters degree in Architecture and Urbanism, so it should be obvious how he ended up in operations for an internet Q&A community;
  • He’s Portuguese, so Gabe now has some assistance in supporting the needs of our Portuguese-speaking members.
  • He credits his love for anime and manga with getting him this awesome new job.

You might be thinking: “Wait. Operations Specialists? I thought they were just handling emails.” But that would be a waste of their considerable talents. Once João and Kyle have tackled team@, there’s no telling how many new and efficient ways they’ll find to help make our team better at supporting our communities.

If ever you find yourself having to contact us, it’s likely that these brave souls will be fielding your request. Feel free to say hi, or tell them what the best part of your week has been so far!

Stack Overflow Developer Survey 2015: The Results

04-07-15 by Sam Brand. 58 comments

Every year we ask our users to tell us a little about themselves. This year we asked our users to tell us a lot.

For 2 weeks in February 2015, we ran a 45 question survey. We asked where you live, what programming languages & frameworks you use, how much money you make, how much coffee you drink, and whether you prefer tabs or spaces when writing code. More than 26,000 of you responded, making this year’s survey quite possibly the most authoritative developer survey ever conducted.

A few findings:

This is just a start. Check out the full results.

devsurvey-01

Massive thanks to everyone who shared information about themselves. There’s a huge benefit in being able to see who your peers are and what they’re interested in, and we hope this survey is as interesting to all of you as it is to us.

For those of you who want to dive into the data yourselves, we’ll be releasing a full dump of all line-by-line responses within the next couple weeks.

And if you took the survey and counted M&Ms, or if you’re just curious about how well devs can estimate packing density (spoiler: not very well), see how many M&Ms were in the jar.

Have ideas for what we should ask next year? Let us know in the comments.

Stack Exchange Year in Review 2014

01-08-15 by Matt Sherman. 28 comments

We – which is to say, you, the Stack Exchange community – had another great year in 2014.

We cracked Quantcast’s top 50 networks in the US. We did this without posting celebrity gossip, top 10 lists, or cat pictures. We did it by creating artifacts: useful, canonical bits of information, edited, refined, and curated by our community.

By donating your knowledge to the largest community of developers in the world, you’ve been able to create a slice of the Internet that is indeed a better place. Amidst the noise, clutter, and chaos of the web, you’ve built one of the largest, most trusted knowledge repositories ever created.

How many times did people looking for help find your solutions last year? If you were to take the number of visitors to Stack Exchange sites in 2014, it would be larger than the populations of the United States, Russia and Brazil combined.

(Accommodating this many visitors would not be possible without our remarkably lean infrastructure, which served 6.4 billion pageviews last year alone.)

By the Numbers

Let’s focus on how much you did in 2014 to share your knowledge:

  • 3.1 million new questions asked
  • 4.5 million answers submitted
  • 2.7 million edits, which made those posts even more helpful
  • 17 million comments
  • 3.6 million reviews
  • 21 million upvotes; 3.2 million downvotes; 1.8 million accepted answers

Community Highlights

  • We released native mobile apps for iPhone, Android, and iPad, (with an Android Tablet version in the works). Just a year in, hundreds of thousands of you have installed them, and you’ve posted more than 15K posts from the bathroom mobile apps.
  • We launched Portuguese and Japanese Stack Overflows, our first non-English SOs.  Portuguese is now officially our second fastest-growing community ever after hitting 10,000 questions in only 9 months.
  • Stack Overflow Careers added 3,700 new company pages and 29,000 job listings. Finding a better job should be as easy for developers as finding answers on Stack Overflow.

Content Superlatives

Numbers are fine, but answers are better. Let’s look at some of your top posts from 2014.

More Highlights

  • We worked on a lot of open source projects this year, not least bosun, a sophisticated monitoring system.
  • Everything we’ve achieved is thanks to the generosity of our users, so we’re proud to give back. We donated over $60,000 to some of our favorite projects on behalf of our invaluable moderators.
  • We grew to 205 employees here at Stack Exchange (the company), more than 20% of whom work remotely. We now have people in 11 countries with physical offices in New York, London, and Denver. If you want to join us in serving the world’s programmers while building a better, smarter Internet, we’re hiring.

You blew us away last year. Thank you. We can’t wait to see what you’ve got in store for 2015.

Editing is essential: new badges and review enhancements

10-07-14 by Shog9. 34 comments

Explainer - Edited and answered 1 question (both actions within 12 hours, answer score > 0)
Refiner - Edited and answered 50 questions (both actions within 12 hours, answer score > 0)
Illuminator - Edited and answered 500 questions (both actions within 12 hours, answer score > 0)

We rolled out three new badges last week!

These recognize a pattern that sets Stack Exchange apart from the forums and message boards that came before it: answering and editing questions, the ability to not only write an answer that can be useful beyond the immediate asker but also re-write the question such that it can be found and understood by future readers. Thanks to this capability, brilliant explanations need not languish under titles such as “C++ problem” or “Java doubt” – having written an answer that ably fixed the problems in the asker’s code, it is possible to also fix the problems in his writing!

It’s no surprise then that the top editors tend to include an awful lot of the top answerers. If you’re good at writing, good enough to consistently hammer out insightful answers, you’d be a fool not to make sure the introductions to those answers – the questions being answered – were of similar quality. Yet, this seemingly-obvious technique remains unknown to many – indeed, I’ve heard some express shock at the notion that answerers would be allowed to touch the words of those whose questions they strive to interpret and address.

Well, you are allowed. And now, encouraged!

As with previous sets of badges, the bronze level exists to provide a form of “just in time” learning for new users, while the silver and gold levels offer increasingly lofty goals to strive for.

Recent changes to suggested edits

With the introduction of suggested edits, we sought to make the immense power of editing available to anyone reading the site. Instead of going into effect immediately, suggested edits required approval from some number of people who had already earned full editing privileges, thus ensuring some resistance to spammers, vandals and griefers as well as a path by which inexperienced editors could be guided by those with more exposure to community norms. However, several serious deficiencies in this system became apparent over the past few years, so we’ve now taken steps to correct them:

  1. We’re now notifying editors of past rejections when they load the edit form.

    There are some checks in place to avoid hassling folks with occasional rejections, but for a new editor whose edits are being rejected these should help them to improve before they waste too much of their time.
  2. Reviewers are given a limited period of exclusivity for edits they’re reviewing, during which the edit won’t be assigned to anyone else for review. This should greatly reduce the frustration for conscientious reviewers, who might previously find the edit they were reviewing (or improving) already approved or rejected by the time they submitted their review.
  3. Reviewers who wish to perform edits themselves have the option of either approving and editing on top of the suggestion, or rejecting and replacing it with a different edit.

    This replaces both the previous “Improve” option, and the “too minor” rejection reason, allowing edits that make small changes while overlooking large flaws to be quickly discarded, while ensuring that truly helpful edits – even small ones – are more consistently approved. Combined with change #2, this gives a great deal more power to reviewers who are comfortable editing – and who better to review edits than editors?
  4. Finally, we’ve revamped the rest of the predefined suggested edit rejection reasons, improving their context-sensitivity and focusing more specifically on common mistakes and outright abuse.

Together, these changes should offer better guidance to both editors and reviewers, helping both work together effectively.


Big thanks to everyone who chimed in on the meta discussions linked above, as well as those who’ve repeatedly reported these problems over the past few years. Gratitude is also due to the developers who patiently worked to implement these changes, Geoff Dalgas (badges, review changes) and Kevin Montrose (edit rejection feedback). And of course, huge thanks to everyone who uses this tooling in spite of the occasional rough edges.

These changes are part of a project intended to help improve the quality of Q&A on Stack Exchange. Stay tuned for even bigger, better changes in the coming months!

Please welcome jmac, Community Manager of the Rising Sun

07-23-14 by Shog9. 45 comments

As Stack Exchange continues to expand to serve new audiences, we’re constantly on the lookout for folks who can take the principles and practices we all hold dear and communicate them effectively to the folks who would otherwise find them strange and difficult. I’m happy to announce we’ve found another of these rare specimens in the form of Joshua Maciel:

Josh joins us remotely from beautiful Kansai Japan, where youthful ignorance brought him for a two-year stay (maximum!) to teach English. Eleven years later he still hasn’t left, having found gainful employment doing international sales for Japanese manufacturers, along with something he refers to as a ‘social life’ in Western Japan.

After living extensively in two cultures, and working in a half-dozen more, Josh decided that humans are really interesting, despite all their peccadilloes. And what better way to study these humans in their natural habitat than by participating on Stack Exchange!

Josh first caught our attention on Meta, gaining the admiration and respect of us all by politely pointing out how incredibly wrong and delusional most of my opinions are. After a few months of respectable participation on Stack Overflow, he joined our site for questions about workplace and career-related issues and proved me wrong once again by helping the good folk there to push that site out of the beta doldrums and into graduation. He then proceeded to get himself elected as a moderator, where he continued to demonstrate the sort of dedication and tact that has been his hallmark.

Josh can usually be found in his natural habitats: at a baseball game somewhere in the world, sitting with a book in Ubud, or finding a local watering hole to escape the Japanese summer heat. Please join me in toasting to his health as he takes on this new challenge.


Do you have a unique set of skills that would benefit the growing communities here on Stack Exchange? We’re always looking for more help, and would love to hear from you – whether you’re near our NYC HQ or anywhere else in the world. You get to work with enthusiastic folks like Josh and help us guide Stack Exchange as it grows!