site title

Topic: community

Please welcome jmac, Community Manager of the Rising Sun

07-23-14 by Shog9. 52 comments

As Stack Exchange continues to expand to serve new audiences, we’re constantly on the lookout for folks who can take the principles and practices we all hold dear and communicate them effectively to the folks who would otherwise find them strange and difficult. I’m happy to announce we’ve found another of these rare specimens in the form of Joshua Maciel:

Josh joins us remotely from beautiful Kansai Japan, where youthful ignorance brought him for a two-year stay (maximum!) to teach English. Eleven years later he still hasn’t left, having found gainful employment doing international sales for Japanese manufacturers, along with something he refers to as a ‘social life’ in Western Japan.

After living extensively in two cultures, and working in a half-dozen more, Josh decided that humans are really interesting, despite all their peccadilloes. And what better way to study these humans in their natural habitat than by participating on Stack Exchange!

Josh first caught our attention on Meta, gaining the admiration and respect of us all by politely pointing out how incredibly wrong and delusional most of my opinions are. After a few months of respectable participation on Stack Overflow, he joined our site for questions about workplace and career-related issues and proved me wrong once again by helping the good folk there to push that site out of the beta doldrums and into graduation. He then proceeded to get himself elected as a moderator, where he continued to demonstrate the sort of dedication and tact that has been his hallmark.

Josh can usually be found in his natural habitats: at a baseball game somewhere in the world, sitting with a book in Ubud, or finding a local watering hole to escape the Japanese summer heat. Please join me in toasting to his health as he takes on this new challenge.


Do you have a unique set of skills that would benefit the growing communities here on Stack Exchange? We’re always looking for more help, and would love to hear from you – whether you’re near our NYC HQ or anywhere else in the world. You get to work with enthusiastic folks like Josh and help us guide Stack Exchange as it grows!

Putting the Community back in Wiki

04-22-14 by Grace Note. 32 comments

Ever seen this diagram?

That’s the visual elevator pitch for Stack Exchange. We were the little dot in the middle, a potent mix of useful traits from other tools, a wiry mutt full of hybrid vigor. The purpose of this blend was to allow and encourage the construction of a library of solutions, by providing communities with the tools they needed to share their experiences and challenges with others who might struggle with the same issues.

The diagram illustrated where we stole drew inspiration for the design of those tools, and their influence occasionally shows up in the results. Sometimes, a question will end up more like a wiki, other times more like a blog, other times more like a discussion. Because of these roots, we’ve never been too stuck on the purity of the idea of Q&A: over time, when communities using this software needed to deviate a bit, we’ve tried to build in features to give them what they needed to help solve more problems:

  • Users wanted to “blog” about questions where they’d already found solutions, so we introduced self-answered questions
  • People occasionally found themselves needing ongoing discussion to solve a problem, so we added chat forums

…And sometimes, folks realized that they needed a bunch of people to contribute meaningfully to create a post. Not just the collaborative, minor editing that occurs on most questions here; these were cases where multiple users needed to pitch in just to do a topic justice. But there were two points of friction:

  1. Originally, most users couldn’t edit others’ posts, (we didn’t have suggested edits yet)
  2. It’s hard to ask people to put a lot of effort into creating something together when the asker is going to keep all the credit and all the reputation. I don’t care about rep and attribution when I’m self-motivated to improve a post I come across, but it feels different when someone outright asks me to pitch in while intending to keep all the fake internet points for themselves!

That’s where Community Wiki came in – it killed those friction points by eliminating rep generation from those posts and lowering the bar on who could edit them. Which made it much easier for people who wanted to create collaborative, ensemble works – true community owned and edited resources.

But, much like dynamite, this well-intentioned invention was quickly weaponized into an instrument of destruction. Our big mistake: thinking we could systematically detect when such collaboration was happening, and automatically convert those posts to Community Wiki. It sounded awesome – “we’ll help you collaborate even more! When we see enough editors, we’ll save you the trouble of making it community wiki yourself and do it for you…”

Yeah, we are dumb.

In which we stop being dumb

By using ridiculously simplistic heuristics to detect these scenarios, we turned what should have been an act of generosity – an invitation to the community to participate in building a shared resource – into a hidden pitfall for the unwary. Too many helpers? NO ONE GETS CREDIT!!! It was a system that converted helpfulness and generosity into a slap in the face – from a robot.

Therefore, we have removed all automatic Wiki conversion triggers from the software. No longer will answers with more than some arbitrary number of edits, or questions with more than a page of answers suddenly lose their owners. To handle those rare situations where unusual activity levels may indicate misuse, we’ve added some new moderator flags in these scenarios: they can respond when necessary by closing or locking the post – but when there is no fire behind the smoke, they can silently dismiss the flag without disruption.

The once again future of Community Wiki

An author can still apply the status manually when posting or when editing their own answer, and moderators retain the ability to apply it when they deem it truly necessary (for instance, a question attracting very large numbers of partial answers can be a sign of a topic that wants to be a wiki). For the most part, we’ve turned it back into something that you can choose to use in cases where it lets you work together to create something wonderful:

Sometimes these are single, collaborative answers, other times questions where all contributions must be made in the form of edits. In all cases, the results are clearly that of a sum greater than the whole of its parts, a true community project.


source: Wikimedia Commons

Collaboration isn’t a rare thing on our network – the whole system, from posting and editing to voting to moderation, is based on the interaction of multiple users to produce a final product. Community wiki is for a special scenario, something built not by the expertise of one individual, then improved or iterated on by a few others, but rather something created by the concerted efforts of the community as a whole.

2013 Stack Overflow User Survey Results

02-19-14 by Alison Sperling. 45 comments

In 2013, our Stack Overflow community grew from 21.5 million to 26.9 million monthly visitors from 242 countries around the world. We’re doing a lot to keep growing with the community — we now have localized versions of Careers 2.0 for French and German audiences, we’re developing iOS and Android mobile apps for our entire network, and our first ever localized version of Stack Overflow with the Portuguese site currently in beta. As a way for us to make sure we’re doing the most for our users and community on Stack Overflow, we conduct a survey every year to see what you’re up to, how you’re using our site and what else is on your mind. This year, we analyzed a survey sample of 7,500 responses from 96 countries. As a thank you for the time you spent filling it out, we donated an additional $12,000 to our Stack Exchange Charities.

Observations

This is the second year we’re calling out mobile, and yes mobile is still growing.

While only 7.9% of you classified your occupation as a Mobile Application Developer, the majority of respondents (51.5%!) said that their company has a native mobile app. This is an increase from 2012 when 48.2% of respondents had a mobile app.

Android continues to climb while iPhone declines

Not only is the Android Phone the most popular mobile device with 63.8% of respondents saying they have one, the most popular native mobile platform supported is an Android Phone app with 39.5%. The iPhone lost more traction with developers this year with 30.7% of respondents saying they own an iPhone compared to 35.2% in 2012.

Working Remotely

As our Stack Exchange team is growing and we have more employees working remote, we added a number of questions about remote work. While only 10.6% of respondents said they are full-time remote, 63.9% of total respondents say they work remotely at least occasionally.

Here’s a special infographic to sum up our survey findings. If you’d like to do your own analysis you can download the survey results.

developers_final

Raised on The ꞌNet: please welcome Ana Hevesi, Community Manager

11-08-13 by Shog9. 32 comments

We’ve spent a good portion of the year trying to build out our teams to handle the increasing load of work here at Stack Exchange. A big part of this has involved bringing on new community managers: with both a larger number of sites *and* greater numbers of users on those sites, we hadn’t exactly been keeping up with the demand for help and guidance across the network. Tim Post signed on in the spring, followed by Jon Ericson, Gabe Koscky and Pops “Kevin” Chang.

Community Management at Stack Exchange is primarily a support role: assist folks in learning how to use the software, then help them learn to work together as they work to build something awesome. Our goal is to facilitate more than to dictate: if you’ve spent some time on a mature site, you know what we’re all working toward, but sometimes folks need a bit of help figuring out how to get there. Jon compares the job to the art of bonsai: patient observation, deliberate and judicious intervention and correction, more patient observation. We’ve been very lucky to attract so many patient, observant gardeners thus far, and I’m excited to announce that we’ve just hired one more:

Ana Hevesi was raised in New York and socialized on The Internet as much as in “real life”. She grew to be wildly fascinated with how social norms developed on the web, finding the factors that led people to bond, collaborate or conflict with one another to be endlessly intriguing. She was a drama major at a competitive performing arts high school before studying web design and development in college. Dropping out to pursue a more self-directed path as a programmer, Ana attended events and got to know people within the (then rather small) New York tech community. Her new friends threw a wrench into her dev career plans by repeatedly asking for help in managing their relationships with customers. She was hired as the first community manager at Shapeways, helping designers and engineers share their 3D printing expertise and sell their designs. It was at Shapeways where Ana was first introduced to Stack Exchange, observing with interest our approach to community development. She gained further experience in community management at Nodejitsu, as well as knowledge of running a tech support team and the idiosyncrasies of the JavaScript and Node.js communities.

Ana has a keen eye for patterns in social interaction, and delights in finding ways to help folks work together more effectively. When she’s not working, she can be found hanging out in her Brooklyn neighborhood, finding the weirdest and most fun electronic music, hacking on small projects, organizing developer conferences, or digging into a sci-fi novel or a book about behavioral psych.

We’re still in the process of introducing Ana to all of our communities, so please join me in giving her a warm welcome when she drops in on yours.

Community Management by Popular Demand: Kevin Chang Joins The Team

09-06-13 by Shog9. 14 comments

I’ve been posting rather a lot of these announcements lately, as we’ve worked to increase the size of our team to where we can actually do our jobs and still occasionally sleep. So I’m gonna cut right to the chase: we hired Kevin “Lord Popular Demand Torgamus” Chang!

Kevin lives on the east coast of the US, not too far from where he grew up. He’s been working as a software developer until now, and as such his first experience with Stack Exchange was on Stack Overflow, where he was fairly active until he found Meta Stack Overflow. He liked MSO because it was kind of like SE sites for psychology, UX, communication, HCI and programming all rolled into one, and his love for this tasty amalgam shows in the crazy amount of reputation he accumulated there. When not working, he likes to spend time on personal programming projects, being outdoors, trying out new restaurants and playing board/card/video games.

Kevin has been a pillar of the Stack Exchange community for many years, with some especially notable work on our venerable Meta site. His ability to understand human behavior and cut to the root of an issue with his writing has proved invaluable in the past, and we’re extremely happy to have him lending his expertise here full-time. As a sign of just how much he cares about the folks he’s here to serve, his first action as a community manager was to shorten his name to the much easier to remember and type “Pops”. Please give him a warm welcome when you see him pop up around the network!