site title

Topic: Beta

Google’s OpenIDs are Unique Per-Domain

04-30-09 by Jeff Atwood. 31 comments

If you’ve been trying to log in to the serverfault.com private beta and haven’t been able to, here’s probably why:

  1. You use Google’s (otherwise excellent) OpenID support on Stack Overflow.
  2. As we just discovered, Google’s OpenIDs are unique per-domain.
  3. Thus, the OpenID string key “fingerprint” that we use to identify you on Stack Overflow is not the same as the OpenID string key that Google returns for Server Fault.

Until we come up with a better workaround, what we recommend is adding an alternate Stack Overflow OpenID from myopenid or another service where the OpenID URL is stable. For example, one of my OpenID accounts is codinghorror.myopenid.com which works fine in both places.

It’s easy to add an alternate OpenID, just make sure you’re logged into your Stack Overflow account, first, then click the “New Login” link as described here.

(this strange behavior is documented by Google as well.)

Server Fault Private Beta begins

04-30-09 by Jeff Atwood. 58 comments

We’re launching the Server Fault private beta tonight. What is Server Fault?

Server Fault is for system administrators and IT professionals, people who manage or maintain computers in a professional capacity. If you are in charge of …

  • servers
  • networks
  • many desktop PCs (other than your own)

… then you’re in the right place to ask your question! Well, as long as the question is about your servers, your networks, or your desktops, anyway.

In other words, it is exactly like Stack Overflow, but instead of being a community for programmers, it’s a community for sysadmins and IT pros.

press any key to visit serverfault.com

We are seeding the beta with programmers who also happen to be sysadmins. The private beta is open to any interested Stack Overflow users with reputation scores of 100 or higher; to get started, simply go to serverfault.com and provide this password:

alt.sysadmin.recovery

Yes, this is a reference to the alt.sysadmin.recovery FAQ, which is absolutely hilarious.

Once you’ve entered the password, log in normally using your existing OpenID. As a Stack Overflow user in good standing, you will get a few Server Fault new account perks: all your user information will be transferred over automatically, and an initial reputation bonus of 101 points added.

(note that if you use Google OpenID exclusively, there may be an issue with the OpenID string that is returned for a different domain, so please try our workaround.)

For feedback purposes, we have also set up a Server Fault uservoice site, and a Server Fault team email address. Just like on Stack Overflow, these are both linked from the bottom of every page on the site.

If you’d like to be a part of the Server Fault beta, but do not have a Stack Overflow account with 100 or more rep, then do this:

  1. Sign up for an OpenID if you do not have one already; we continue to recommend myopenid.
  2. Send a request to team@serverfault.com with your OpenID URL.

Once we have your OpenID we’ll add it to the beta list and you’ll be able to log in, but you will not get the reputation bonus that existing Stack Overflow users get. (Note that requests without an OpenID URL will not be honored, so please make sure you have an OpenID URL before requesting access!)

We don’t expect major problems since the site is based on the now-mature Stack Overflow codebase — but if you do encounter beta issues, please let us know via the Server Fault uservoice site linked on the bottom of every page!

The private beta should run for about 1 to 2 weeks. Have fun, and feel free to forward this private beta information to any sysadmins or IT pros you think might be interested; everyone is welcome!

Then a Miracle Occurs – Public Beta

09-15-08 by Jeff Atwood. 42 comments

stackoverflow.com is now live and open to the public, as a public beta.

I think you should be more explicit here in step two.

Our heartfelt thanks to all the software developers who so patiently helped us test the site during the private beta. You are the true heroes of this project, contributing your time in creating over 8,500 questions in a month and a half — not to mention putting up with our bugs and errors. Your beta badges are forthcoming.

society-for-asking-stupid-questions

We’ll see how long Stack Overflow manages to stay up now that it’s in public view. We did some last minute caching and optimizations that should help.

I, for one, am keeping my fingers crossed.

Help Us Beta Test

09-11-08 by Jeff Atwood. 20 comments

If you’d like to help us beta test Stack Overflow, in advance of the Monday launch, here’s how:

  1. Go to beta.stackoverflow.com
  2. Enter “twitter@twitter.com” and “falkensmaze” to gain access (note that this is NOT an account: it’s merely a password to gain access to the beta)
  3. Please do bear in mind the beta test guidelines.

When asking questions, try to keep them on topic:

  • Is your question about programming?
  • We prefer questions that can be answered, not just discussed.
  • Provide details, but write clearly and simply.

I thought these guidelines were straightforward, but they haven’t stopped anyone from asking anything they damn well please. Every time I visit the site, I half expect to see “How do I make a peanut butter and jelly sandwich?”

If you’re wondering what’s so special about Stack Overflow, the answer is — well, nothing, really. It’s a programming Q&A website. The only unusual thing we do is synthesize aspects of Wikis, Blogs, Forums, and Digg/Reddit in a way that is somewhat original. Or at least we think so.

stackoverflow-venn-diagram

Stack Overflow is that tiny asterisk in the middle, there.

But hopefully you’ll see what I mean when you experience it for yourself.

I Guess That’s Why They Call It “Beta”

08-28-08 by Jeff Atwood. 40 comments

Just a quick note to the beta participants:

We apologize for the recent spate of outages. We’re currently diagnosing a sporadic hang in the website that we haven’t quite got a handle on yet. Until we figure it out, we’re forced to restart the web service every few hours.

I’ll update this post when we get it licked, but until then, expect a bit more turbulence than usual. We appreciate your patience.

Edit: Problem solved; see Podcast #20 for explanation.