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Announcing The Launch Of Meta Stack Exchange

04-17-14 by Tim Post. 14 comments

We’re very pleased to announce that as of today, we’re (finally) splitting the site formerly known as Meta Stack Overflow into two sites:

Meta Stack Overflow is a brand-spanking new site for discussions specific to the Stack Overflow (programming) community:

 Meta Stack Overflow

Meta Stack Exchange will cover feature requests, bugs, and any discussion topics that affect the entire network:

 Meta Stack Exchange

Meta has always been one of the most important things that make our network… work. Almost all of our most important features, improvements, and community rules were partly or entirely based on our users telling us how we could help you help more people. Hell, even the idea of Meta itself came from the community – and we fought it hard before we realized how right you guys were. But meta has always had two key functions:

  1. Local governance – communities have to decide what’s on- and off- topic, what tags to use, and how to deal with topic-specific guidelines like how sources should be cited.
  2. Federal law and product feedback – Most changes to the engine affect all sites, and some guidelines and rules (“be nice”) are the same network wide.

And that’s why every site except Stack Overflow has always had its own meta site, so it could focus on the “local governance” issues that were specific to that community. But as the network has grown, many users have shown enthusiasm not just about the sites where they participate, but also about how the whole system should work. It’s time to give these discussions a place of their own.

Prior to today, Meta Stack Overflow doubled as the home of both discussions about broad network changes, and discussions around the unique issues that Stack Overflow faces (often due to its enormous scale). The percent of problems Stack Overflow shares with its smaller sister sites has become exceedingly low, which has created an awkward dissonance when it comes to how folks perceive and approach challenges.

For example, some new sites embrace the idea of highly specific, narrowly-scoped questions that seek product recommendations, – something that is perfectly acceptable to explore on many sites but completely off-limits on Stack Overflow.

Someone else might be interested in strategies to better promote and grow new sites when they come out of private beta, which might apply to many network sites, but is obviously a problem that the Stack Overflow community is not facing. The scale of Stack Overflow puts an interesting twist on almost every discussion that the Stack Overflow community has; they needed a place of their own to work on their own challenges. Similarly, someone outside of the Stack Overflow community that wants to propose a new feature isn’t likely to be super interested in XML tag synonyms.

When you visit Meta Stack Exchange, you’ll see that the split is still a a work in progress. We’re in the process of migrating quite a few Stack Overflow specific discussions that are still relevant and unresolved, to help to show the kind of topics that belong on the new MSO. Over time we’ll continue to migrate discussions that clearly belong on Meta Stack Overflow back over the fence.

If you’re interested in the nuts and bolts and mechanics of the split itself (such as how rep is going to work, moderators, etc), have a look at the initial project announcement. The plan was extremely simple, and we stuck to it.

Now, we realize that we weren’t exactly hurting for “more challenges in figuring out where to put my post”. That’s why we’re making this really simple:

When in doubt, you can always post your question on your local meta. If it’s clearly relevant to the engine or network as a whole, we’ll move it.

You can always find your local meta right under the main site in the site switcher in the upper left corner of the site:

If you have any input or ideas to share, just go right to your favorite site’s meta and do it there; there’s no need for you to go to Meta Stack Exchange at all.

That said, any time you know your question applies to the the whole network, you’re of course perfectly welcome to participate on Meta Stack Exchange directly.

The largest beneficiary of this split is probably the Stack Overflow community; our flagship site went without a town hall all of its own for way too long. Splitting the two opens up many more possibilities while alleviating noise for everyone.

Young sites don’t generally have, and may never have the sorts of challenges that Stack Overflow did. Now, there’s a place for our smaller communities to come together and figure out what works for them.

Do you have some great ideas that could make quite a few communities even better? Take them to your site’s own little town hall, or feel free to bring them to the capital city directly. Do you have ideas that suit the scale of Stack Overflow? Well then, c’mon, get meta, as it was intended.

Changes and guidelines for the Protected Question status

04-08-14 by Shog9. 18 comments

Protected status is an often-overlooked feature of Stack Exchange. It’s based loosely on Wikipedia’s semi-protection, and like that tool is meant to be a reaction to persistent abuse from anonymous or unproven participants: when a page attracts a lot of noise or vandalism from outside the community, Protecting it reduces the amount of clean-up needed later on.

Protected questions are not answerable by folks who haven’t earned at least 10 reputation from activity on the site where the question resides. This effectively means you need to have posted an answer somewhere else that’s attracted an up-vote or a question that’s earned two.

Originally, this functionality was limited to moderators, but during the past several years we’ve made a few changes to encourage more productive use:

  • Privileged users can protect and unprotect any question over a day old. Previous unprotect restrictions lifted as of today.

  • The system (in the guise of the Community user) will automatically protect questions that’ve had either

    1. 3 answers from new users deleted – this handles questions that tend to attract large amounts of spam over time.
    2. 5* answers from new users scoring <= 0 posted in the past 24 hours - this handles questions that are somewhat topical, and are attracting large numbers of "participants" who aren't actually contributing anything useful. This is also new as of today.

*This value can be higher or lower on sites that have demonstrated “special” patterns of new-user interaction.

Guidelines for Protecting questions:

  • Do protect questions that are attracting a lot of non-answers or very poor answers (spam, etc.) from new users.

  • Don’t protect questions just because they’re linked to on a high-traffic news site like Reddit or Ars Technica. While there’s certainly some correlation between sudden spikes in popularity and associated non-answers, not all popular questions suffer from this.

  • Do unprotect questions that aren’t currently attracting a lot of attention and don’t have a long history of unproductive answers.

Judicious use of this feature is critical to allowing these sites to handle large amounts of external attention, but over-using it breaks the system: Stack Exchange sites depend on a constant influx of new blood, both to answer new questions and provide updated information on old ones. When in doubt, err on the side of letting new users prove themselves before locking them out.

2013 Stack Overflow User Survey Results

02-19-14 by Alison Sperling. 45 comments

In 2013, our Stack Overflow community grew from 21.5 million to 26.9 million monthly visitors from 242 countries around the world. We’re doing a lot to keep growing with the community — we now have localized versions of Careers 2.0 for French and German audiences, we’re developing iOS and Android mobile apps for our entire network, and our first ever localized version of Stack Overflow with the Portuguese site currently in beta. As a way for us to make sure we’re doing the most for our users and community on Stack Overflow, we conduct a survey every year to see what you’re up to, how you’re using our site and what else is on your mind. This year, we analyzed a survey sample of 7,500 responses from 96 countries. As a thank you for the time you spent filling it out, we donated an additional $12,000 to our Stack Exchange Charities.

Observations

This is the second year we’re calling out mobile, and yes mobile is still growing.

While only 7.9% of you classified your occupation as a Mobile Application Developer, the majority of respondents (51.5%!) said that their company has a native mobile app. This is an increase from 2012 when 48.2% of respondents had a mobile app.

Android continues to climb while iPhone declines

Not only is the Android Phone the most popular mobile device with 63.8% of respondents saying they have one, the most popular native mobile platform supported is an Android Phone app with 39.5%. The iPhone lost more traction with developers this year with 30.7% of respondents saying they own an iPhone compared to 35.2% in 2012.

Working Remotely

As our Stack Exchange team is growing and we have more employees working remote, we added a number of questions about remote work. While only 10.6% of respondents said they are full-time remote, 63.9% of total respondents say they work remotely at least occasionally.

Here’s a special infographic to sum up our survey findings. If you’d like to do your own analysis you can download the survey results.

developers_final

Stack Exchange Gives Back 2013

12-23-13 by Robert Cartaino. 42 comments

This is a time of year of traditions and celebrations — and we have a tradition at Stack Exchange where we set this time aside each year to give back to the groups and organizations that need our help. Each year, we reach out to our moderators and offer to make a $100 donation to charity on behalf of each moderator for their Stack Exchange community. It’s just a small gesture of thanks for the tremendous amount of work every community has contributed to make this entire thing possible.

This “giving back” program actually goes waaay back to the beginning when we started with only 18 moderators and three sites. As our ranks grew, so did the donations. So on behalf of the 375 moderators this year, we have made the following donations to charity:

SE Gives Back 2013 Blog

It is also important to remember and support the tools and organizations that make what we do possible, so we also made the following donations:

  • HAProxy — $1,000.00
  • jQuery Foundation — $1,000.00
  • Linux Foundation — $1,000.00
  • OpenSTV, the voting engine that drives our elections — $1,000.00

In addition, we continue to be a MathJax Partner with a donation of $20,000 in our commitment to helping math and science communities on the web.

As we approach 2014, I think a lot about what we have built here together. I think about the fact that this is all made possible by people who DONATE their time and GIVE freely their knowledge to benefit future readers who come here seeking help. It’s your contributions here that make all this possible. It’s what keeps the lights on and the wheels turning… and what makes this small gesture of giving back possible.

I take a lot of pride in what we do — and you should, too. This giving back program is just one of the many things we as a community do that is easy to feel pretty good about. It makes me delighted to be a part of this organization and part of a community that works so hard to help people they will probably never meet.

Take care, and see you in 2014!

SE Gives Back 2013 Blog Pic

Raised on The ꞌNet: please welcome Ana Hevesi, Community Manager

11-08-13 by Shog9. 32 comments

We’ve spent a good portion of the year trying to build out our teams to handle the increasing load of work here at Stack Exchange. A big part of this has involved bringing on new community managers: with both a larger number of sites *and* greater numbers of users on those sites, we hadn’t exactly been keeping up with the demand for help and guidance across the network. Tim Post signed on in the spring, followed by Jon Ericson, Gabe Koscky and Pops “Kevin” Chang.

Community Management at Stack Exchange is primarily a support role: assist folks in learning how to use the software, then help them learn to work together as they work to build something awesome. Our goal is to facilitate more than to dictate: if you’ve spent some time on a mature site, you know what we’re all working toward, but sometimes folks need a bit of help figuring out how to get there. Jon compares the job to the art of bonsai: patient observation, deliberate and judicious intervention and correction, more patient observation. We’ve been very lucky to attract so many patient, observant gardeners thus far, and I’m excited to announce that we’ve just hired one more:

Ana Hevesi was raised in New York and socialized on The Internet as much as in “real life”. She grew to be wildly fascinated with how social norms developed on the web, finding the factors that led people to bond, collaborate or conflict with one another to be endlessly intriguing. She was a drama major at a competitive performing arts high school before studying web design and development in college. Dropping out to pursue a more self-directed path as a programmer, Ana attended events and got to know people within the (then rather small) New York tech community. Her new friends threw a wrench into her dev career plans by repeatedly asking for help in managing their relationships with customers. She was hired as the first community manager at Shapeways, helping designers and engineers share their 3D printing expertise and sell their designs. It was at Shapeways where Ana was first introduced to Stack Exchange, observing with interest our approach to community development. She gained further experience in community management at Nodejitsu, as well as knowledge of running a tech support team and the idiosyncrasies of the JavaScript and Node.js communities.

Ana has a keen eye for patterns in social interaction, and delights in finding ways to help folks work together more effectively. When she’s not working, she can be found hanging out in her Brooklyn neighborhood, finding the weirdest and most fun electronic music, hacking on small projects, organizing developer conferences, or digging into a sci-fi novel or a book about behavioral psych.

We’re still in the process of introducing Ana to all of our communities, so please join me in giving her a warm welcome when she drops in on yours.