site title

Topic: announcement

About Page 2.0: The QuickStartening

01-29-13 by Jay Hanlon. 22 comments

We’ve just rolled out a new Quick Start guide to help new users learn the basics. Here’s one example, but you can find any site’s version by going to sitename.com/about.

2013-01-28_20-36-00

Imagine you’re visiting a new friend’s home and…

“Please, make yourself at home. Oh, actually, could you not sit on that? Yes, it looks like a couch. That’s what makes it so avant-garde. But it’s actually art. Whoah, careful there, too – I see your confusion, as that does resemble a doorknob, but it’s actually a very small furnace. And – I’m sorry, but – could you NOT use a coaster? We’re testing the effects of wet drinks on finished wood, and coaster usage generates noise in our data.”

When you’re surrounded by familiar things, but using them the way you normally do leads to different, negative outcomes, it’s extremely disorienting.

At Stack Exchange, “weird” is a feature, not a bug.

Our sites are different. And that difference is deliberate. The things that confuse folks who are used to forums, or those broad, “ask anything” sites are the very things that we believe make us work better.

I'm a little embarrassed I couldn't turn this up sooner.

I’m a little embarrassed I couldn’t turn this up sooner.

For us, different is good. Just like my mommy always told me. But it’s still jarring. And when it’s too jarring, potentially valuable contributors are put off and leave. They didn’t get help, and we lost an expert. Being jarring came at a high cost.

Easing them into our weirdness.

To mitigate new users’ frustration, we need a page that can do three things:

1. Describe just the ways that we’re different.

We don’t bother telling users about the things that are similar to the other sites they’ve used. Instead, we focus on the delta – the things that are likely to be surprises to them. For example:

  • Posts are collaboratively edited
  • Chit chat and pure discussion are generally not welcome
  • Some things that sound a lot like what’s on topic are expressly off-topic here, and questions about those things get closed.

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Now, obviously, users could just discover these things as they use the site, but however much you do or don’t grok our system, surprises suck. Most of life’s surprises fall closer to the kind involving gum discoveries in improbable locations than the ones that come in pony-shaped boxes. Whatever you think about a rule’s merit, learning about it after you’ve broken it tends to adversely impact your view of it. There’s a big difference between giving your wife a poem you wrote her, only to recieve a red-lined markup, complete with suggestions as to how to be less derivative, and having her edit one that you’re hoping to submit to a journal after she offered to give you feedback.

2. Explain why we’re different.

If you’re going to make someone think, or god forbid, try to change the way they do something, you damn well better convince them there’s a good reason.

  • Why allow users to edit each other’s posts? Because it makes the average quality of our content higher than sites where responses are limited to a single user’s experiences.
  • Why edit out harmless chit chat? Because we want to make the best answers more findable than they are in traditional forums.

If you tell someone you don’t allow chit-chat, but you fail to give them the reason, the first time they have their “thank you!” deleted as noise, they’re less likely to think about our “answer findability optimization” than our “tendency toward pedantic, manners-hating fascism”.

3. Get them to actually read it.

Research tells us that pages like this are significantly less effective if no one reads them. The challenge is that, surprisingly, most people who arrive at a website with a problem to solve do not seem to have the following first instinct:

“I wonder if they have any detailed, hopefully exhaustive documentation that covers their rules, best practices and societal mores. I’d just love to read it in its entirety before trying to get help with my problem!”

Does it cover typing in boxes on websites?  That's what I need to learn about.

Does it cover typing in boxes on websites? That’s what I need to learn about.

Now, I do realize that some non-trivial portion of this blog’s audience is like us, and is thinking that that’s actually exactly what we might do. Which is why we love you so much. But, most people, even most experts, are not like us. Please trust me when I tell you this:

Most people do not believe they should need to expand their education in any way whatsoever prior to typing in a box on the internet.

They just don’t. So, if you want any shot at getting them to read a primer, you need to make it easy on the eyes, and keep it to a length that respects their time, rather than one that implies that they may need to secure some provisions or sled dogs prior to proceeding.

So, we pared it to just those topics that were absolutely necessary for a new user to get started successfully. Which was the hardest part; it’s much easier to be comprehensive than brief. Some of our choices may surprise you, but they all resulted from analysis, testing, and discussion. “Tags? Really?” Yep, we felt the same way. Until we did some user testing and almost every single user on the non-tech sites expressed some variation of the following:

“You said I had to add a tag. I didn’t even know what a tag WAS, but I used my context clues and I figured it out. And added one. And now it’s telling me that I NEED MORE REPUTATION TO CREATE NEW &*%$ing tags. I hope a rock falls on you. A heavy one.”

Tagging may not seem like something a new user needs to be thinking about, but it’s actually critical because almost invariably, they get it wrong. The same is true for comments and even editing. The subject-matter experts who do stick around long enough to make a few mistakes will learn, but often after frustrating themselves – and site regulars – in the process. Knowing roughly what to expect going in should help to ease the transition for all involved.

Which is good, because we can’t afford to have a site’s next Jon Skeet wasting his time casting geologic hexes on me, when we really need him to focus his energy on answering questions. Hopefully, this guide will help.

Announcing a new way to change your profile picture

01-15-13 by Jeremy Tunnell. 31 comments

One of our New Year’s resolutions here at Stack Exchange is to take a hard look at our user experience. As the network has grown and our audience expanded, the system has grown with it – but there are some rough edges in places that can use a bit of smoothing. You’ll be seeing a lot of improvements over the next few months, but today I’d like to announce the first bit of polish: built-in profile pictures.

We have used Gravatar to let you manage your profile picture since roughly six to eight weeks before Stack Overflow entered beta. Gravatar is a wonderful service that lets you use a consistent, recognizable image for yourself across many different services and sites. It’s free, it’s fairly easy to add support for it (which made it a great fit for Stack Overflow in the early days), it doesn’t require any special configuration to make it work on multiple sites (which made it a great fit as Stack Exchange grew) and best of all it supports distinct, recognizable default images for folks who haven’t uploaded their own.

There’s one problem: if you don’t have a Gravatar account, you can’t have a custom picture. One basic bit of personalization turns into Yet Another Username & Password, which is annoying if Stack Exchange is the only place you would ever use it, and somewhat embarrassing considering our support for OpenID means you don’t need another set of credentials to use Stack Exchange itself!

So from now on, anyone who wants a custom picture can simply upload one from their computer or the web. If you hover your mouse over your picture on your profile page, you’ll see a new link to ”change picture”:

new change picture option

Click on that, click the “Upload a new picture” button, select a picture from your computer (or enter the URL of an image on the web), and finally click the “Upload” button. That’s it.

If you decide to switch back to your Gravatar, you can do that at any time:

selection UI

As always, you can have a different picture and bio for each site, or use the button at the bottom of your profile edit page to copy everything network wide. And since we default to Gravatar for profile pictures, your existing photos (or abstract patterns) will remain unchanged until you want them to change.

We would like to thank Alan and team at Imgur for doing the image hosting and being incredibly helpful during the whole process. They turned what would’ve been a major development effort into something we could roll out in a couple of weeks.

Try it out, and let us know what you think on meta!

Apptivate.MS: the results are in!

12-20-12 by Abby T. Miller. 16 comments

After almost three months, Apptivate – the application development contest collaboration between Stack Overflow and Microsoft – has come to an end.

Let’s get to the big news right off the bat. Congratulations to our two Apptivate.MS Grand Prize Winners: Piano Time and Layout!

Congratulations to Piano Time and Layout!

Layout is a powerful tool for interaction design that makes prototyping in the early stages of development and design a breeze. Piano Time is a multitouch piano keyboard for your Surface or other Windows 8 tablet device. (It also supports using your keyboard as, well, a keyboard.) It includes recording and playback, a metronome, a learning mode, and more.

As grand prize winners, these two apps win a $5,000 cash prize! They will also be featured in MSDN Flash and on the DevRadio show, and they will be promoted by Microsoft throughout the developer community.

The grand prize winners came from a pool of 15 finalists and were chosen by a panel made up of Stack Overflow’s own Joel Spolsky and David Fullerton, as well as Microsoft developer evangelists Doris Chen and Jeff Brand. There was some stiff competition for the judges to choose from, and we congratulate all of our finalists. They won’t be going home empty-handed, either – along with the winners of the Reviewer Sweepstakes, they’ll go home with some great prizes, too. The first place winners from each category group win a Surface plus a $500 cash prize. The second and third place winners go home with good stuff, too. Johnny, tell ‘em what they’ve won!

And you get a Surface! And you get a Surface! EVERYONE gets a Surface!

The 15 finalists came from a pool of 50 semi-finalists, which in turn came from the list of over 300 fully eligible submissions to Apptivate. Some more stats about the event:

  • There were 456 apps submitted overall, including deleted and ineligible apps
  • The third week of November was the best week for app submission, with 49 apps coming in that week
  • Apptivate users posted 2646 questions and answers in the [windows-8] and [microsoft-metro] Stack Overflow tags
  • Over the course of the event, 3163 users voted (on apps or on comment threads) 7454 times

That’s all for Apptivate… in 2012! The response to this was so positive, we’re already on the lookout for similar collaborations in the new year… So stay tuned!

Welcome to Winter Bash 2012!

12-18-12 by Aarthi Devanathan. 21 comments

It’s been an amazing year for Stack Exchange, both as a network of experts and enthusiasts and as an organization. We launched twenty new sites, rolled out tons of user-requested features, and are helping 99% more visitors get answers than we were a year ago.

Last year, we celebrated the holidays on Gaming with Hat Dash, where users collected virtual hats by doing various (good, helpful) things on the site. They were sort of like festive, temporary badges (and, like badges, borrowed another good idea from the XBox – earning the ability to customize your avatar).

The response from that event was so positive, we decided to extend that to the entire network1 this holiday season.

Welcome to Winter Bash 2012!

What is Winter Bash?

From 19 December to 4 January you’ll be able to decorate your gravatar with a special hat. The hats used on Arqade smelled a bit funny, so we made up an all-new set of hats for you to earn this year. In fact, many of these “hats” aren’t even hats! There are sunglasses, moustaches, masks and other assorted headgear.

Each hat has different criteria to unlock it, and there are even some secret hats that you won’t find out about until you happen to stumble across them accidentally.


Hats show up all over the site, wherever your gravatar is shown (well, except for a few places where they didn’t fit, like chat). To change which hat you’re wearing, or to admire your lovely hat collection, just visit http://winterba.sh or check out your user page:

You’ll also get a notification when you earn a new item:

For all those of you who really hate hats, there’s an “I hate hats” link in the Winter Bash dropdown. But give it a shot before you turn it off — you might find a hat you like!

Check out the Winter Bash FAQ for more details.

Why are we doing this?

Because it’s fun, and we love fun – at least, constructive fun, in moderation, at the end of a long, exciting and eventful year. Also, hats are awesome.2


1Well. Only those sites that opted to participate. You must opt-in on Stack Overflow.

2 Please note: virtual hats do not protect against the harmful rays of the sun – always wear sunscreen!

Stack Overflow localizes Careers 2.0 in German

12-12-12 by Bethany Marzewski. 9 comments

After months of work from our dev team, last week marked the official launch of our first localized site with Careers 2.0 in German. We celebrated the occasion in style on December 5 with a blow-out party at Betahaus in Berlin complete with product demos, free food, free t-shirts, oh, and German beer of course.

But why Germany? Well, aside from the fact that it gave us a great excuse to make these really cool t-shirts, we have a few other pretty good reasons for this expansion:

 

  • Germans are the largest non-English-speaking group of Stack Overflow users in Europe
    To date, visitors from Germany represent the fourth largest global audience who visit Stack Overflow on a monthly basis—making this the largest non-English speaking European userbase. And even though many of these users do speak English (at least for programming), employers or hiring managers who don’t speak English can’t use the Careers 2.0 global site as easily as fluent English speakers. With this localization, we hope to bring Careers 2.0 to everyone on both sides of the hiring equation.
  • Better exposure for our German candidates

    We have more than 3,600 German candidate profiles in our Careers 2.0 database, and in a job market where German tech hiring needs have more than doubled in the past three years, programmer jobs are in hot demand. (In fact, a couple of guys even showed up to our launch party wearing QR code t-shirts in their search for a developer.) Making a German site will hopefully give these candidates even more exposure to all great local companies—not just those who have a hiring manager who speaks English.

  • Germany’s tech market has been growing exponentially

    It’s been estimated that 11 billion Euros are lost in possible output because German companies can’t hire enough engineers. And as the world’s largest resource for programmers (Google analytics counted more than 30 million unique visitors last month!), we hope to help solve that problem by connecting companies with the software developers they need.

  • It was a good excuse for us to start accepting Euros

    If you log onto careers.stackoverflow.com/de, you’ll be prompted to pay for your job listings in Euros. If you’ve ever tried to buy something on a site in a foreign currency, you know what a pain it can be to deal with the exchange rates and credit card fees. Now we’re just more accessible for a lot more people. (We’re also now accepting the British Pound on the UK site.)

 

All in all, it’s been a great project for our team (though also a difficult one, as you’ll hear about in a future blog post) and localizing the site was an important way for us to support the German-speaking community on Stack Overflow.  As always, we’re open to hearing your feedback, so let us know what you think.

 

P.S. We know we missed some things, so if you speak German, feel free to check out the site and let us know what we still need to fix.