site title

Topic: announcement

Stack Exchange for the iPad is here – and iOS apps now support iOS 8

11-03-14 by Kasra Rahjerdi. 20 comments

When we launched our iOS and Android apps, we were pretty sure they’d help our most active users in a couple of ways:

  • Push inbox notifications are epic – you can know the minute you get an answer or someone comments on your post.
  • The personalized mobile feed lets you browse all content relevant to you, whether it’s posts from your communities or replies to your posts.
  • Voting, commenting, and minor edits are all things you often want to do when you’re away from your desktop, and an interface built for touch makes them a breeze.

Those were a huge success; a ton of our most active users loved them. Here’s what we didn’t expect:

A lot of people are posting from the app.

  • Over twenty-five thousand posts have been made from the app…
  • …More than 69% of them are answers!
  • The average quality of the posts is significantly higher than the overall average.1

Those on-screen buttons may not have the same satisfying click your Cherry MXs do, but despite your freakishly large thumbs, an amazing number of you are helping others from the bus. Or in line at the DMV. Or at other times that you’re… just not at your computer. (They tell me I can’t make a “or while in the bathroom” joke here. Because of course that would be a joke, right?) That’s not just a reflection of how dedicated our users are to sharing their knowledge; it’s also awesome for my personal job security, so thanks!


(Phil Schiller with actual-size prototypes.)

Bigger is Better

So that’s all great. But we still had a problem. Sure, the iPhone 6+ is big – but even the new iPhone 6+ probably can’t show you all the upvotes you’ve earned today from all the knowledge you’ve dropped lately.

So, what are you supposed to do? Scroll? Like an animal?!?

We thought not. So, we’re ecstatic to announce Stack Exchange for iPad, built from the ground up for the ideal tablet experience.2

Go download it now! What if we raised the price to $0.99 next week? Think about how long you’d agonize over paying nearly a dollar for this wonderful app. We really don’t want that stress for you, so go get it now. (Okay, we’re probably not going to charge for it. But why risk it? Isn’t life stressful enough?)

The Feed: Bigger than Ever

Thanks to the bigger screen real estate, we were able to let the feed display way more of your recent notifications, achievements, and recommended questions. If you haven’t downloaded it yet, there’s a screenshot at the top of this post – just look at all that information!


There’s also a dedicated, swipe-browsable hot questions section at the top. Did you ever wish you could swipe new things onto your screen, without the sense of guilt that comes from swiping a human out of your life based entirely on their looks? Have you ever wanted to know if a society could evolve without wood, or if submarines technically “float”? Your day has come.


Editor and Preview Just Might be Better than on the Web

We can’t overstate how happy we’ve been to see people writing actual, great posts on the go. This new update makes that even easier, with touch-optimized Markdown tools in the composer, and a live preview that’s right next to the compose window, so you can see your beautiful formatting as you type (without scrolling!)

This is just the start. Given how much you’re posting using the applications, we’re going to be focusing a lot on making the entire process nicer.

When we started out, we thought the iPad standard browser experience was pretty solid, and we decided we weren’t going to build an iPad app unless we thought it actually improved that experience. Between the touch optimized browsing and interface elements, side-by-side composing, and a much more integrated experience going from one site to the next, we’re convinced it does just that – we’ve been testing it a lot internally for the last few months and I can’t live without it; hopefully you’ll feel the same.

So, if you’ve got an iPad, get to the store and download it now. (No worries, it’s still free. For now…)  If you’re an iPhone user, the new update also includes lots of quality of life changes for you too (including full iOS 8 support), so upgrade or install it today!

Not an iOS user?

  • If you’re an Android tablet user, don’t worry, we’re working on things to make you happy too.
  • If you’re a Windows Phone pioneer, check out this meta discussion.
  • If you’re anxiously waiting for a Symbian or WebOS version, please submit your request via betamax video, ideally delivered by a human being riding on a horse, don’t forget to have another person following to clean up after the horse.

Feedback

These apps couldn’t have happened without our incredible beta testers from the community, and we’re counting on you to tell us how to make it even better! Please post any feature requests you have on Meta – and if you find a bug, please report that too.


1 To be fair, there’s probably a lot of selection bias there – the app users are likely our most active, experienced users, but the point is this: the posts from the app are good.
2 Technically, it’s iOS 1.2.0, a universal app available now for iPhone and iPad.

Editing is essential: new badges and review enhancements

10-07-14 by Shog9. 34 comments

Explainer - Edited and answered 1 question (both actions within 12 hours, answer score > 0)
Refiner - Edited and answered 50 questions (both actions within 12 hours, answer score > 0)
Illuminator - Edited and answered 500 questions (both actions within 12 hours, answer score > 0)

We rolled out three new badges last week!

These recognize a pattern that sets Stack Exchange apart from the forums and message boards that came before it: answering and editing questions, the ability to not only write an answer that can be useful beyond the immediate asker but also re-write the question such that it can be found and understood by future readers. Thanks to this capability, brilliant explanations need not languish under titles such as “C++ problem” or “Java doubt” – having written an answer that ably fixed the problems in the asker’s code, it is possible to also fix the problems in his writing!

It’s no surprise then that the top editors tend to include an awful lot of the top answerers. If you’re good at writing, good enough to consistently hammer out insightful answers, you’d be a fool not to make sure the introductions to those answers – the questions being answered – were of similar quality. Yet, this seemingly-obvious technique remains unknown to many – indeed, I’ve heard some express shock at the notion that answerers would be allowed to touch the words of those whose questions they strive to interpret and address.

Well, you are allowed. And now, encouraged!

As with previous sets of badges, the bronze level exists to provide a form of “just in time” learning for new users, while the silver and gold levels offer increasingly lofty goals to strive for.

Recent changes to suggested edits

With the introduction of suggested edits, we sought to make the immense power of editing available to anyone reading the site. Instead of going into effect immediately, suggested edits required approval from some number of people who had already earned full editing privileges, thus ensuring some resistance to spammers, vandals and griefers as well as a path by which inexperienced editors could be guided by those with more exposure to community norms. However, several serious deficiencies in this system became apparent over the past few years, so we’ve now taken steps to correct them:

  1. We’re now notifying editors of past rejections when they load the edit form.

    There are some checks in place to avoid hassling folks with occasional rejections, but for a new editor whose edits are being rejected these should help them to improve before they waste too much of their time.
  2. Reviewers are given a limited period of exclusivity for edits they’re reviewing, during which the edit won’t be assigned to anyone else for review. This should greatly reduce the frustration for conscientious reviewers, who might previously find the edit they were reviewing (or improving) already approved or rejected by the time they submitted their review.
  3. Reviewers who wish to perform edits themselves have the option of either approving and editing on top of the suggestion, or rejecting and replacing it with a different edit.

    This replaces both the previous “Improve” option, and the “too minor” rejection reason, allowing edits that make small changes while overlooking large flaws to be quickly discarded, while ensuring that truly helpful edits – even small ones – are more consistently approved. Combined with change #2, this gives a great deal more power to reviewers who are comfortable editing – and who better to review edits than editors?
  4. Finally, we’ve revamped the rest of the predefined suggested edit rejection reasons, improving their context-sensitivity and focusing more specifically on common mistakes and outright abuse.

Together, these changes should offer better guidance to both editors and reviewers, helping both work together effectively.


Big thanks to everyone who chimed in on the meta discussions linked above, as well as those who’ve repeatedly reported these problems over the past few years. Gratitude is also due to the developers who patiently worked to implement these changes, Geoff Dalgas (badges, review changes) and Kevin Montrose (edit rejection feedback). And of course, huge thanks to everyone who uses this tooling in spite of the occasional rough edges.

These changes are part of a project intended to help improve the quality of Q&A on Stack Exchange. Stay tuned for even bigger, better changes in the coming months!

Introducing Runnable JavaScript, CSS, and HTML Code Snippets

09-16-14 by David Haney. 94 comments

On Stack Overflow and our other code-related sites, creating a minimal, complete, and verifiable example is the best way to get an answer to your question. We’ve always loved JSFiddle and sites like it because they let both askers and answerers reference runnable, working code that demonstrates their problem or solution.

Unfortunately, the use of these external sites introduces a few problems:

  1. If the link breaks, the post becomes worthless.
  2. If the code isn’t embedded in the page, visitors are forced to go elsewhere to get the full content of the question or answer.
  3. Also, because the code isn’t a part of our post Markdown, changes to it don’t show up in the revision history.

The community voiced similar concerns around external sites, which eventually led us to block posts that contain links to JSFiddle and similar sites without a corresponding code block. This is an unnecessary burden for both askers and answerers.

So we’ve created our own way to embed runnable JavaScript, CSS, and HTML code blocks right in the body of a post. As of today, we’re launching “Stack Snippets,” a fully integrated feature available on Stack Overflow and any other code-related Stack Exchange sites.

How Do Stack Snippets Work?

With Stack Snippets, a code block:

Code block

Can become a runnable code block:

Runnable code block

The code will not run until you press the “Run code snippet button:

Runnable code block that has been executed

How Do I Make A Stack Snippet?

Stack Snippets work for both questions and answers. In the Markdown editor window, there’s a new button that you can click to launch the Stack Snippets editor.

The Markdown toolbar with the new Stack Snippet button

The editor appears and allows you to enter HTML, CSS, and JavaScript (or any combination of them):

The Stack Snippet editor

Once you’ve got your code working, press “Insert into Post” at the bottom and you’re done! You can test your snippet, or load it back into the Snippets editor from right in the Preview screen:

The run and edit options of Stack Snippets in the editor preview

When answering a post containing a snippet, you can easily include a modified version of the original in your answer – just click the “Copy snippet to answer” button.

Under the Hood

A great feature of Stack Snippets is that they are inserted as regular Markdown code blocks:

The actual Markdown of a Stack Snippet

This makes them instantly backwards-compatible with our normal revision history and diffs, and also any API clients including our own mobile apps.

The runnable snippets behavior is triggered by a few new HTML comments that are not rendered by Markdown. You can even edit the code right from the Markdown editor and the snippet will still be runnable.

Are Stack Snippets Safe?

Yes, as much as the web in general is safe. You are not in any more danger than you are when browsing any site with JavaScript enabled. With that said, the snippets are running client code in your browser, and you should always exercise caution when running code contributed by another user.

We isolate snippets from our sites to block access to your private Stack Exchange data:

  • We use HTML5 sandboxed iframes in order to prevent many forms of malicious attack.
  • We render the Snippets on an external domain (stacksnippets.net) in order to ensure that the same-origin policy is not in effect and to keep the snippets from accessing your logged-in session or cookies.

Like all other aspects of our site, Stack Snippets are ultimately governed by the community. Because users can still write code that creates annoying behaviors like infinite loops or pop-ups, we disable snippets on any post that is heavily downvoted (scoring less than -3 on Stack Overflow, -8 on Meta). If you see bad code that you think should be disabled, downvote the post. If you see code that is intended to be harmful (such as an attempt at phishing), you should flag it for moderator attention.

What About Other Languages?

Our initial release supports HTML, CSS, and JavaScript because questions on these topics use external code hosting sites the most frequently. These languages also run client-side in the user’s browser, making them self-contained and easy to support. Server-side languages are much more complicated and require significant infrastructure changes in order to properly implement. We don’t have any specific plans at this time to implement other languages, but it’s something we might consider in the future.

What About Sites Like JSFiddle?

You can still use sites like JSFiddle if you prefer them. JSFiddle and similar sites still have a bunch of features that we have not implemented yet. The normal rules for a link still apply: make sure you copy the relevant code into your question or answer so that it can be accessed if the external site is unavailable.

We decided to implement our own version instead of embedding a third-party site for the reasons mentioned earlier:

  • There’s no need to copy-paste the code into the post. It’s all embedded in the post automatically, so revision history and diffs just work.
  • There’s no need to visit another site to get your answer. The best experience is one where your question and answer(s) are complete and on the same page.
  • Since we host it, we can guarantee performance and up-time. We have high standards when it comes to performance and up-time, and want to make sure that the ability to run a snippet is always available.

Give Stack Snippets A Try

We’re excited to see how the community uses Stack Snippets, and looking forward to your feedback:

  • If you find bugs, or you’d like to give specific feedback on Stack Snippets, you can post on Meta Stack Exchange using the tag stack-snippets.
  • If you just want to try it out, we’ve created a sandbox on Meta Stack Exchange.
  • If you feel that a particular site should have Stack Snippets, post a feature-request on that site’s meta – if there’s support from the community there, we’ll enable them.

We’ve already started piloting it on Code Review and are seeing some neat results. Don’t hesitate to share interesting examples you come across – or create – here in the comments.

Have fun!

Stack Exchange for iPhone is here!

05-08-14 by Kasra Rahjerdi. 39 comments

Earlier this year, we announced the release of our Android application and the public feedback was fantastic. Well, it turns out we offended our designers by not doing an iPhone application too. So, after spending the last few months apologizing and bribing them (turns out designers love moleskins in pantone colors), we’re excited to announce the release of Stack Exchange for your iPhone.

Feed Me, Seymour

At the heart of our mobile applications is The Feed which gives you a deeply personalized selection of content customized to what’s relevant to you.

It includes any new answers, comments, or upvotes on your posts, and even new questions we think you’d like based on your previous activity. It basically does all the hard work to make it so you always have something interesting waiting for you a tap on a blue icon away. Since it’s personalized, try not to judge me based on how nerdy the following sample is:

Real time feedback

Stack Exchange for iPhone sends you instant notifications any time someone interacts with you, so when you urgently need to figure out how long cooked chicken lasts in the fridge (turns out, a couple days) you’ll get a notification the second someone answers your question.

And you can always customize the notifications in your iPhone’s built in Settings, in case you don’t want to get a message in the middle of the night (and end up dreaming of chicken).

Like Stack Exchange on your computer, but better.

You can ask, answer, comment, and vote, and there’s even a built-in Markdown keyboard. Plus, you can upload images straight from your device.

The next time you want to identify a cool font you see on a poster, you can immediately post a question with a picture of it from your iPhone.

What about feature [...]?

While the application currently has some awesome features, it doesn’t have everything. If you find something wrong or missing, please let us know. Use your fancy new app to post a question on Meta using the ios-app tag.

There are already some great suggestions, and while we’re currently working on a dedicated tablet interface for both iPads and Android, the urgency of our iPhone improvements will be pretty closely related to the vote count of posts on meta.

Speaking of which, we’d like to give a huge thanks to the awesome people who answered our call to arms (well, thumbs) to test this application, and who provided us with great feedback (including the list of suggestions above).

So, what are you waiting for? Go download Stack Exchange on your iPhone now and you’ll  never have to wait until you get back home to figure out “What was that movie with the guy and that thing?” again!

Putting the Community back in Wiki

04-22-14 by Grace Note. 32 comments

Ever seen this diagram?

That’s the visual elevator pitch for Stack Exchange. We were the little dot in the middle, a potent mix of useful traits from other tools, a wiry mutt full of hybrid vigor. The purpose of this blend was to allow and encourage the construction of a library of solutions, by providing communities with the tools they needed to share their experiences and challenges with others who might struggle with the same issues.

The diagram illustrated where we stole drew inspiration for the design of those tools, and their influence occasionally shows up in the results. Sometimes, a question will end up more like a wiki, other times more like a blog, other times more like a discussion. Because of these roots, we’ve never been too stuck on the purity of the idea of Q&A: over time, when communities using this software needed to deviate a bit, we’ve tried to build in features to give them what they needed to help solve more problems:

  • Users wanted to “blog” about questions where they’d already found solutions, so we introduced self-answered questions
  • People occasionally found themselves needing ongoing discussion to solve a problem, so we added chat forums

…And sometimes, folks realized that they needed a bunch of people to contribute meaningfully to create a post. Not just the collaborative, minor editing that occurs on most questions here; these were cases where multiple users needed to pitch in just to do a topic justice. But there were two points of friction:

  1. Originally, most users couldn’t edit others’ posts, (we didn’t have suggested edits yet)
  2. It’s hard to ask people to put a lot of effort into creating something together when the asker is going to keep all the credit and all the reputation. I don’t care about rep and attribution when I’m self-motivated to improve a post I come across, but it feels different when someone outright asks me to pitch in while intending to keep all the fake internet points for themselves!

That’s where Community Wiki came in – it killed those friction points by eliminating rep generation from those posts and lowering the bar on who could edit them. Which made it much easier for people who wanted to create collaborative, ensemble works – true community owned and edited resources.

But, much like dynamite, this well-intentioned invention was quickly weaponized into an instrument of destruction. Our big mistake: thinking we could systematically detect when such collaboration was happening, and automatically convert those posts to Community Wiki. It sounded awesome – “we’ll help you collaborate even more! When we see enough editors, we’ll save you the trouble of making it community wiki yourself and do it for you…”

Yeah, we are dumb.

In which we stop being dumb

By using ridiculously simplistic heuristics to detect these scenarios, we turned what should have been an act of generosity – an invitation to the community to participate in building a shared resource – into a hidden pitfall for the unwary. Too many helpers? NO ONE GETS CREDIT!!! It was a system that converted helpfulness and generosity into a slap in the face – from a robot.

Therefore, we have removed all automatic Wiki conversion triggers from the software. No longer will answers with more than some arbitrary number of edits, or questions with more than a page of answers suddenly lose their owners. To handle those rare situations where unusual activity levels may indicate misuse, we’ve added some new moderator flags in these scenarios: they can respond when necessary by closing or locking the post – but when there is no fire behind the smoke, they can silently dismiss the flag without disruption.

The once again future of Community Wiki

An author can still apply the status manually when posting or when editing their own answer, and moderators retain the ability to apply it when they deem it truly necessary (for instance, a question attracting very large numbers of partial answers can be a sign of a topic that wants to be a wiki). For the most part, we’ve turned it back into something that you can choose to use in cases where it lets you work together to create something wonderful:

Sometimes these are single, collaborative answers, other times questions where all contributions must be made in the form of edits. In all cases, the results are clearly that of a sum greater than the whole of its parts, a true community project.


source: Wikimedia Commons

Collaboration isn’t a rare thing on our network – the whole system, from posting and editing to voting to moderation, is based on the interaction of multiple users to produce a final product. Community wiki is for a special scenario, something built not by the expertise of one individual, then improved or iterated on by a few others, but rather something created by the concerted efforts of the community as a whole.