site title

Topic: announcement

Andreessen Horowitz Invests in Stack Exchange

01-20-15 by Joel Spolsky. 79 comments

(Note: This is a cross post from Joel on Software).

Stack Exchange Raises $40m

Today Stack Exchange is pleased to announce that we have raised $40 million, mostly from Andreessen Horowitz.

Everybody wants to know what we’re going to do with all that money. First of all, of course we’re going to gold-plate the Aeron chairs in the office. Then we’re going to upgrade the game room, and we’re already sending lox platters to our highest-rep users.

But I’ll get into that in a minute. First, let me catch everyone up on what’s happening at Stack Exchange.

In 2008, Jeff Atwood and I set out to fix a problem for programmers. At the time, getting answers to programming questions online was super annoying. The answers that we needed were hidden behind paywalls, or buried in thousands of pages of stale forums.

So we set out to build Stack Overflow with a single-minded, compulsive, fanatical obsession with serving programmers by building a better Q&A site.

Everything about how Stack Overflow works today was designed to make programmers’ jobs easier. We let members vote up answers, so we can show you the best answer first. We don’t allow opinionated questions, because they descend into flame wars that don’t help people who need an answer right now. We have scrupulously avoided any commercialization of our editorial content, because we want to have a site that programmers can trust.

Heck, we don’t even allow animated ads, even though they are totally standard on every other site on the Internet, because it would be disrespectful to programmers to strain their delicate eyes with a dancing monkey, and we can’t serve them 100% if we are distracting them with a monkey. That would only be serving them 98%. And we’re OBSESSED, so 98% is like, we might as well close this all down and go drive taxis in Las Vegas.

Anyway, it worked! Entirely thanks to you. An insane number of developers stepped up to pass on their knowledge and help others. Stack Overflow quickly grew into the largest, most trusted repository of programming knowledge in the world.

Quickly, Jeff and I discovered that serving programmers required more than just code-related questions, so we built Server Fault and Super User. And when that still didn’t satisfy your needs, we set up Stack Exchange so the community could create sites on new topics. Now when a programmer has to set up a server, or a PC, or a database, or Ubuntu, or an iPhone, they have a place to go to ask those questions that are full of the people who can actually help them do it.

But you know how programmers are. They “have babies.”  Or “take pictures of babies.” So our users started building Stack Exchange sites on unrelated topics, like parenting and photography, because the programmers we were serving expected—nay, demanded!—a place as awesome as Stack Overflow to ask about baby feeding schedules and f-stops and whatnot.

And we did such a good job of serving programmers that a few smart non-programmers looked at us and said, “Behold! I want that!” and we thought, hey!  What works for developers should work for a lot of other people, too, as long as they’re willing to think like developers, which is the best way to think. So, we decided that anybody who wants to get with the program is welcome to join in our plan. And these sites serve their own communities of, you know, bicycle mechanics, or what have you, and make the world safer for the Programmer Way Of Thinking and thus serve programmers by serving bicycle mechanics.

In the five years since then, our users have built 133 communities. Stack Overflow is still the biggest. It reminds me of those medieval maps of the ancient world. The kind that shows a big bustling city (Jerusalem) smack dab in the middle, with a few smaller settlements around the periphery. (Please imagine Gregorian chamber music).

View of Jerusalem

View of Jerusalem

Stack Overflow is the big city in the middle. Because the programmer-city worked so well, people wanted to ask questions about other subjects, so we let them build other Q&A villages in the catchment area of the programmer-city. Some of these Q&A villages became cities of their own. The math cities barely even have any programmers and they speak their own weird language. They are math-Jerusalem. They make us very proud. Even though they don’t directly serve programmers, we love them and they bring a little tear to our eyes, like the other little villages, and they’re certainly making the Internet—and the world—better, so we’re devoted to them.

One of these days some of those villages will be big cities, so we’re committed to keeping them clean, and pulling the weeds, and helping them grow.

But let’s go back to programmer Jerusalem, which—as you might expect—is full of devs milling about, building the ENTIRE FUTURE of the HUMAN RACE, because, after all, software is eating the world and writing software is just writing a script for how the future will play out.

So given the importance of software and programmers, you might think they all had wonderful, satisfying jobs that they love.

But sadly, we saw that was not universal. Programmers often have crappy jobs, and their bosses often poke them with sharp sticks. They are underpaid, and they aren’t learning things, and they are sometimes overqualified, and sometimes underqualified. So we decided we could actually make all the programmers happier if we could move them into better jobs.

That’s why we built Stack Overflow Careers. This was the first site that was built for developers, not recruiters. We banned the scourge of contingency recruiters (even if they have big bank accounts and are just LINING UP at the Zion Gate trying to get into our city to feed on programmer meat, but, to hell with them). We are SERVING PROGRAMMERS, not spammers. Bye Felicia.

Which brings us to 2015.

The sites are still growing like crazy. By our measurements, the Stack Exchange network is already in the top 50 of all US websites, ranked by number of unique visitors, with traffic still growing at 25% annually. The company itself has passed 200 employees worldwide, with big plush offices in Denver, New York, and London, and dozens of amazing people who work from the comfort of their own homes. (By the way, if 200 people seems like a lot, keep in mind that more than half of them are working on Stack Overflow Careers).

We could just slow down our insane hiring pace and get profitable right now, but it would mean foregoing some of the investments that let us help more developers. To be honest, we literally can’t keep up with the features we want to build for our users. The code is not done yet—we’re dedicating a lot of resources to the core Q&A engine. This year we’ll work on improving the experience for both new users and highly experienced users.

And let’s not forget Stack Overflow Careers. I believe it is, bar-none, the single best job board for developer candidates, which should  automatically make it the best place for employers to find developer talent. There’s a LOT more to be done to serve developers here and we’re just getting warmed up.

Scent

So that’s why we took this new investment of $40m.

We’re ecstatic to have Andreessen Horowitz on board. The partners there believe in our idea of programmers taking over (it was Marc Andreessen who coined the phrase “Software is eating the world”). Chris Dixon has been a personal investor in the company since the beginning and has always known we’d be the obvious winner in the Q&A category, and will be joining our board of directors as an observer.

This is not the first time we’ve raised money; we’re proud to have previously taken investments from Union Square Ventures, Index Ventures, Spark Capital, and Bezos Expeditions. We only take outside money when we are 100% confident that the investors share our philosophy completely and after our lawyers have done a ruthless (sorry, investors) job of maintaining control so that it is literally impossible for anyone to mess up our vision of fanatically serving the people who use our site, and continuing to make the Internet a better place to get expert answers to your questions.

For those of you who have been with us since the early days of Our Incredible Journey, thank you. For those of you who are new, welcome. And if you want to learn more, check out our hott new “about” page. Or ask!

 

Stack Exchange Year in Review 2014

01-08-15 by Matt Sherman. 28 comments

We – which is to say, you, the Stack Exchange community – had another great year in 2014.

We cracked Quantcast’s top 50 networks in the US. We did this without posting celebrity gossip, top 10 lists, or cat pictures. We did it by creating artifacts: useful, canonical bits of information, edited, refined, and curated by our community.

By donating your knowledge to the largest community of developers in the world, you’ve been able to create a slice of the Internet that is indeed a better place. Amidst the noise, clutter, and chaos of the web, you’ve built one of the largest, most trusted knowledge repositories ever created.

How many times did people looking for help find your solutions last year? If you were to take the number of visitors to Stack Exchange sites in 2014, it would be larger than the populations of the United States, Russia and Brazil combined.

(Accommodating this many visitors would not be possible without our remarkably lean infrastructure, which served 6.4 billion pageviews last year alone.)

By the Numbers

Let’s focus on how much you did in 2014 to share your knowledge:

  • 3.1 million new questions asked
  • 4.5 million answers submitted
  • 2.7 million edits, which made those posts even more helpful
  • 17 million comments
  • 3.6 million reviews
  • 21 million upvotes; 3.2 million downvotes; 1.8 million accepted answers

Community Highlights

  • We released native mobile apps for iPhone, Android, and iPad, (with an Android Tablet version in the works). Just a year in, hundreds of thousands of you have installed them, and you’ve posted more than 15K posts from the bathroom mobile apps.
  • We launched Portuguese and Japanese Stack Overflows, our first non-English SOs.  Portuguese is now officially our second fastest-growing community ever after hitting 10,000 questions in only 9 months.
  • Stack Overflow Careers added 3,700 new company pages and 29,000 job listings. Finding a better job should be as easy for developers as finding answers on Stack Overflow.

Content Superlatives

Numbers are fine, but answers are better. Let’s look at some of your top posts from 2014.

More Highlights

  • We worked on a lot of open source projects this year, not least bosun, a sophisticated monitoring system.
  • Everything we’ve achieved is thanks to the generosity of our users, so we’re proud to give back. We donated over $60,000 to some of our favorite projects on behalf of our invaluable moderators.
  • We grew to 205 employees here at Stack Exchange (the company), more than 20% of whom work remotely. We now have people in 11 countries with physical offices in New York, London, and Denver. If you want to join us in serving the world’s programmers while building a better, smarter Internet, we’re hiring.

You blew us away last year. Thank you. We can’t wait to see what you’ve got in store for 2015.

So long Winter Bash 2014

01-06-15 by Jon Ericson. 36 comments

While testing hats before the start of Winter Bash 2014, a snowflake notification told me I’d earned the Treasure Hunter hat. After adjusting pirate paraphernalia to fit my head, I tried to remember what triggers this particular hat. As it happens, I’d just received a gold badge on Cooking that I would’ve totally ignored if not for the associated hat. Suddenly I understood why this time of year resonates with our most accomplished users. Earning cosmetic items, as silly as they are, temporarily reminds us of what it was like to begin participating on Stack Exchange months or years ago. Plus, hats look really cool.

This year 84,439 users earned a total of 244,865 hats, which is slightly up from last year.

Secrets revealed

The most common hat (awarded 70,361 times to 39,499 distinct users) turned out to be the secret Chameleon. On Meta Stack Exchange folks correctly noted that it was triggered by editing certain fields in your profile. Our intention was that it would be triggered by changes in a user’s avatar. However, due to an otherwise low-priority bug, the hat seemingly was awarded randomly after profile edits. So the theme of this hat is less camouflage and more Mixed Up Chameleon.

Two more secret hats, Fascinating (34,026 times to 25,017 users) and Fascinating, Ma’am (12,342 times to 10,526 users) were earned by voting on posts that were already quite well received. (The first was for upvoting an accepted answer with a score of 5 or more and the second was for voting up a question with 10,000+ views and a score of at least 25.) These are, of course, Star Trek references which brings the total to three. That compares to one Star Wars reference last year, for those keeping score.

We awarded Warm Welcome (14,430 times to 9,597 users) to people who upvoted another user’s first post. It was gratifying to see so many of these hats awarded. Upvoting quality posts sets up a positive feedback loop encouraging a new user to post again. Each time I was awarded this hat, I felt good knowing that I’d done just a little bit to improve the overall quality of content on the site.

Last year, abby hairboat did such a great job of wrangling hats we descided to prank her honor her with a hat awarded to those responding to one of her posts or comments. Hence, the HairBoat (awarded 699 times to 569 distinct users). She was so pleased that she promised to send me a gift: a box of live spiders. What a kidder! (In unrelated news, my oldest child will now earn a little extra allowance in exchange for his new title: Family Postal Inspector.)

The last four secret hats were harder to earn than the most common four by more than an order of magnitude. Time Lord (404 times to 378 distinct users) was given for people who edited at least 5 questions more than a year old. Plenty of people edit older posts once in a while, but not many update that many out-of-date posts in a short period of time. One of my goals for designing hat triggers was to test potential permanent badge ideas. This trigger (which we also explored with the “A Link to the Past” hat last year) is something I hope to evaluate as a badge idea in the coming year.

I was somewhat surprised with how few people earned Waffles (365 times to 331 users) for downvoting a question, editing it, and upvoting it in that order. Looking at the data, it turns out that only about 2% of people who edit a question and later upvote it had downvoted it first. During Winter Bash 2014, the ratio increased to about 10%. Likely some of the increase in pre-downvoting came from dedicated breakfast hat hunters. When you think about it, downvoting a post you are about to edit amounts to wasted effort. Either fix a post until it’s better or downvote and move on. In sum, a fun concept for a hat (especially if you like waffles), but not a good badge idea.

Finally, we awarded 15 detectives with the Eureka! light bulb for correctly and independently guessing the trigger conditions for secret hats. We didn’t award Eurekas for guessing Eureka! itself this year since it was largely unchanged from last year.

Non-secret hats

The most common non-secret hat was Saint Lucia (25,444 times to 19,390 users). It was also the first awarded (December 14 at 1200 UTC). Yes, that’s a day late. Other time-based hats were: Solstice (7,581 times to 6,858 users), Kofia (4,152 times to 4,019 users), Gelt (813 times to 757 users), Bill Lumbergh (325 times to 318 users), Resolution (244 times to 222 users), Stockings Hung by the Fire (223 times to 196 users), and Mistletoe (207 times to 154 users). Due to timezones, we were pretty generous with the timing. But not Mistletoe, which required chatting within a ten minute period around January 1, 2015 0000 UTC. Thankfully our chat servers handled the load just fine.

The mobile app must have been on our mind recently since there are a number of hats that required it: Bugdroid (7,115 times to 4,776 users), Not a cherry (3,829 times to 2,403 users), On The Road (511 times to 451 users), and Got a Tablet for Christmas (231 times). I personally got an iPhone 6 for Christmas and used the iOS app to earn “Not a cherry”. Verdict: my fingers are still too big for phone-sized keyboards. Maybe I should get a tablet.

Right in the middle of Winter Bash, balpha allowed hats to be rotated 360°. Lot’s of folks took advantage of this to concoct brand new hats such as the Praying Mantis, Soccer Necklace, Crab Face Googly Eyes, Next Generation Earpiece, and, of course, the Mulletbeard™.

The most difficult hat was the Red Baron earned by just 26 users. It required posting an answer that was so good it changed they way people looked at the question. A great example of how this works is this answer, which was submitted while the question was at -7. After the answer (and a strategic edit to the question), the question got 10 straight upvotes to bring the score to +3 at the time of writing. Without the hat, this amazing accomplishment would have gone unrecognized. Especially pleasing for us: the idea for this hat came from a user suggestion to replace the existing Reversal badge. When it comes to amazing, talented and dedicated users, Stack Exchange’s cup overflows.

We’ve been asked to share statistics about hats this year, which we are happy to do. In the weeks to come, I will be reporting things we learned from Winter Bash over on Meta Stack Exchange. In the meantime, enjoy a few more of my favorite hat-wearing avatars:

As last year, the hats were illustrated by Elias Stein. I hope you enjoyed his work as much as we did. Thanks Elias!

Announcing the winners

Everyone who participated is a winner! Okay, that’s not what you are here for. Four individuals top the network-wide leaderboard:

Network-wide leaderboard

Please join me in congratulating the users who earned all 38 hats across the network:

And with that, we must say a fond farewell to the hats of 2014. If you have any feedback on this year’s event, please weigh in on Meta Stack Exchange.


* The leaderboard counts hats earned across the network. While all four earned the maximum network-wide, the tiebreaker goes to the person who scored the most hats on their home site. Mike Miller’s 36 hats on Mathematics was the maximum he could earn. The two he missed on Math were HairBoat, since Abby hadn’t posted on his site and Kofia, which is awarded to brand-new posters only.

Stack Overflowへようこそ

12-15-14 by Joshua Maciel. 100 comments

Hi English-language readers! This blog post is not for you; perhaps you’d like a hat instead? No? Well, when last we spoke of creating non-English versions of Stack Overflow, some of you were certain we should’ve gone the easy route and just leveraged a machine translation service instead of creating real sites for real people to use. I humbly invite you to read the rest of this post using the mechanical babelfish of your choice, and see if you think such tools can be relied on for important work…

2008年にStack Overflowが設立された目的は、プログラミングに関する質問の全ての回答をまとめあげ、それらを提供する場を作る事でした。Stack Overflowの誕生以前は、プログラマー自身が自身の貴重な時間を使い、複数のブログ、掲示板やニュースグループで回答を検索した上で、その回答が有効か否かを自分自身でチェックするしかありませんでした。

現在、Stack Overflowは700万個以上の質問をまとめている事で、毎月4,400万人のプログラマーをサポートしています。そしてそのうち60万人以上もの人が日本からアクセスしています。Stack Overflowは英語のサイトにも関わらず、日本のプラグラマーのプログラミング問題を解決する為の必要なツールになってきました。

Stack Overflow日本語版へようこそ

日本には100万人以上のプログラマーがいます。

Stack Overflow日本語版の誕生により今後は、英語と格闘しながらプログラミング問題を解決する必要が無くなります。

2014年12月2日にStack Overflow日本語版のプライベートベータを開始し、1週間で1000人以上のユーザーと100個以上の質問が集まりました。そして今、日本の全てのプログラマーに開放する運びとなりました。Stack Overflow英語版と同じ様に皆様と一緒に日本語でのリソースを作成しましょう。

日本のプログラマーを応援しましょう

これからは日本語でのプログラミングに関する質問や回答の投稿が可能となります。今日から投稿して頂く質問は将来の日本人プログラマーのサポートとなります。日本のプログラミング能力を集結し皆様の知識のレベルアップを図れるチャンスです!

Stack Overflowは皆様のサイトです

Stack Overflowはコミュニティのものです。参加者は投票する事で最も有効な質問や回答を示す事が出来、権限において投稿の編集や管理を行う事も出来ます。そして、コミュニティ内で当サイトの改善案を自由にメタで討議する事ができます。コミュニティは既にリスト質問リンクのみの回答をどうするべきか討議を開始しています。

当サイトは日本語のプログラミング問題・回答のベストリソースを目指しています。皆様と一緒に作り上げましょう!

Winter Bash 2014

12-14-14 by Jon Ericson. 30 comments

There is no better antidote, at least for the worst hours and eclipses of the soul, than to conjure up …
serious frivolity.—Friedrich Nietzsche

Winter Bash 2014

What’s Winter Bash again?

No, it’s not a new flavor of Unix shell. Rather, Winter Bash is an ancient tradition of Stack Exchange. (2011 is ancient according to Internet time.) Here’s how it works:

  1. Starting right now, when you complete one of 30-odd challenges while logged on a participating site, you will be awarded the associated hat. To notify you, an icon will light up on the top bar. In addition, admire your hat collection on the Winter Bash 2014 site. Finally, your profile includes the number of unique snowflakes hats (You have a hat to wear!) you’ve earned all around the network.
  2. Once you acquire an item, click your avatar to pick a hat that you earned—not just on the current site, but anywhere. When you are satisfied the hat’s position, click “Wear hat” and it will be visible everywhere your avatar is displayed. Optionally, you may have a different look on each site. Once you are wearing a hat, you’ll also see an option to go unadorned. (But really, why would you want that?)

    I'm a pirate!

  3. On January 4, 2015 at 23:59:59 UTC, all hats will be returned to the Stack Exchange vault. The best way to preserve holiday memories is to take plenty of pictures before they are gone.

Again with the hats? What happened to “We hate fun”?

In the face of the darkening days of winter, we put aside our steely, businesslike frowns to wear virtual cosmetic items. It’s our solemn duty to cut out the nonsense leaving pure, unadulterated knowledge as permanent artifacts helpful to future visitors. And that task is no laughing matter.

Yet, to quote G. K. Chesterton:

About what other subjects can one make jokes except serious subjects?

The truth is, we don’t really hate fun. Contributing to a volunteer effort should be an enjoyable experience. Heck, fake internet points are integral to how these sites operate. Winter Bash reminds us that there’s more to life than nose-to-the-grindstone work and quality content. We don’t stop having fun when the event ends. We go back to having fun with a larger purpose.

Is everything going to be the same as last year?

Management gave us a clear mandate when it came to building new features into Winter Bash:

We were not allowed to spend weeks on snow animation.

Thankfully, we could reuse last year’s start-of-the-art snowfall algorithm for the official Winter Bash 2014 homepage. There you can discover a nearly* complete list of hats and how you can earn them. The activities this year are mostly fresh and (hopefully) all fun. If you could go ahead and answer 5 questions on Saturday, that’d be great. Mmmkay?

Once again, we are delighted with the work of freelance illustrator, Elias Stein. It’s difficult to express how satisfying it feels to think up a concept (Tam o’ Shanter!) and have it manifest a few days later:

Tam o' Shanter

In the past, some people have had trouble getting hats to fit properly. Last year, we added the ability to reposition hats, but that did little to satisfy folks with especially large or disembodied heads. So, this year hats can be resized and twisted to fit your head. (Thanks, balpha!)

Shog The Hunter

If you have any questions about the event, try the Frequently Asked Questions. If your question isn’t covered there, please ask it on Meta Stack Exchange, our Q&A site about our network of Q&A sites.

Before signing off, I apologize to our Southern Hemisphere friends for the name. I wanted to go with something season-neutral like HAT ATTACK or December Fling, but tradition ruled the day. Just remember: while you are sipping refreshing drinks and enjoying the sunshine, it’s cold, wet, and dark up here.

Act now and get an exclusive hat only available today!


* status-bydesign