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Introducing Runnable JavaScript, CSS, and HTML Code Snippets

posted under by on 09-16-14 43

On Stack Overflow and our other code-related sites, creating a minimal, complete, and verifiable example is the best way to get an answer to your question. We’ve always loved JSFiddle and sites like it because they let both askers and answerers reference runnable, working code that demonstrates their problem or solution.

Unfortunately, the use of these external sites introduces a few problems:

  1. If the link breaks, the post becomes worthless.
  2. If the code isn’t embedded in the page, visitors are forced to go elsewhere to get the full content of the question or answer.
  3. Also, because the code isn’t a part of our post Markdown, changes to it don’t show up in the revision history.

The community voiced similar concerns around external sites, which eventually led us to block posts that contain links to JSFiddle and similar sites without a corresponding code block. This is an unnecessary burden for both askers and answerers.

So we’ve created our own way to embed runnable JavaScript, CSS, and HTML code blocks right in the body of a post. As of today, we’re launching “Stack Snippets,” a fully integrated feature available on Stack Overflow and any other code-related Stack Exchange sites.

How Do Stack Snippets Work?

With Stack Snippets, a code block:

Code block

Can become a runnable code block:

Runnable code block

The code will not run until you press the “Run code snippet button:

Runnable code block that has been executed

How Do I Make A Stack Snippet?

Stack Snippets work for both questions and answers. In the Markdown editor window, there’s a new button that you can click to launch the Stack Snippets editor.

The Markdown toolbar with the new Stack Snippet button

The editor appears and allows you to enter HTML, CSS, and JavaScript (or any combination of them):

The Stack Snippet editor

Once you’ve got your code working, press “Insert into Post” at the bottom and you’re done! You can test your snippet, or load it back into the Snippets editor from right in the Preview screen:

The run and edit options of Stack Snippets in the editor preview

When answering a post containing a snippet, you can easily include a modified version of the original in your answer – just click the “Copy snippet to answer” button.

Under the Hood

A great feature of Stack Snippets is that they are inserted as regular Markdown code blocks:

The actual Markdown of a Stack Snippet

This makes them instantly backwards-compatible with our normal revision history and diffs, and also any API clients including our own mobile apps.

The runnable snippets behavior is triggered by a few new HTML comments that are not rendered by Markdown. You can even edit the code right from the Markdown editor and the snippet will still be runnable.

Are Stack Snippets Safe?

Yes, as much as the web in general is safe. You are not in any more danger than you are when browsing any site with JavaScript enabled. With that said, the snippets are running client code in your browser, and you should always exercise caution when running code contributed by another user.

We isolate snippets from our sites to block access to your private Stack Exchange data:

  • We use HTML5 sandboxed iframes in order to prevent many forms of malicious attack.
  • We render the Snippets on an external domain (stacksnippets.net) in order to ensure that the same-origin policy is not in effect and to keep the snippets from accessing your logged-in session or cookies.

Like all other aspects of our site, Stack Snippets are ultimately governed by the community. Because users can still write code that creates annoying behaviors like infinite loops or pop-ups, we disable snippets on any post that is heavily downvoted (scoring less than -3 on Stack Overflow, -8 on Meta). If you see bad code that you think should be disabled, downvote the post. If you see code that is intended to be harmful (such as an attempt at phishing), you should flag it for moderator attention.

What About Other Languages?

Our initial release supports HTML, CSS, and JavaScript because questions on these topics use external code hosting sites the most frequently. These languages also run client-side in the user’s browser, making them self-contained and easy to support. Server-side languages are much more complicated and require significant infrastructure changes in order to properly implement. We don’t have any specific plans at this time to implement other languages, but it’s something we might consider in the future.

What About Sites Like JSFiddle?

You can still use sites like JSFiddle if you prefer them. JSFiddle and similar sites still have a bunch of features that we have not implemented yet. The normal rules for a link still apply: make sure you copy the relevant code into your question or answer so that it can be accessed if the external site is unavailable.

We decided to implement our own version instead of embedding a third-party site for the reasons mentioned earlier:

  • There’s no need to copy-paste the code into the post. It’s all embedded in the post automatically, so revision history and diffs just work.
  • There’s no need to visit another site to get your answer. The best experience is one where your question and answer(s) are complete and on the same page.
  • Since we host it, we can guarantee performance and up-time. We have high standards when it comes to performance and up-time, and want to make sure that the ability to run a snippet is always available.

Give Stack Snippets A Try

We’re excited to see how the community uses Stack Snippets, and looking forward to your feedback:

  • If you find bugs, or you’d like to give specific feedback on Stack Snippets, you can post on Meta Stack Exchange using the tag stack-snippets.
  • If you just want to try it out, we’ve created a sandbox on Meta Stack Exchange.
  • If you feel that a particular site should have Stack Snippets, post a feature-request on that site’s meta – if there’s support from the community there, we’ll enable them.

We’ve already started piloting it on Code Review and are seeing some neat results. Don’t hesitate to share interesting examples you come across – or create – here in the comments.

Have fun!

43 comments

Please welcome jmac, Community Manager of the Rising Sun

posted under by on 07-23-14 45

As Stack Exchange continues to expand to serve new audiences, we’re constantly on the lookout for folks who can take the principles and practices we all hold dear and communicate them effectively to the folks who would otherwise find them strange and difficult. I’m happy to announce we’ve found another of these rare specimens in the form of Joshua Maciel:

Josh joins us remotely from beautiful Kansai Japan, where youthful ignorance brought him for a two-year stay (maximum!) to teach English. Eleven years later he still hasn’t left, having found gainful employment doing international sales for Japanese manufacturers, along with something he refers to as a ‘social life’ in Western Japan.

After living extensively in two cultures, and working in a half-dozen more, Josh decided that humans are really interesting, despite all their peccadilloes. And what better way to study these humans in their natural habitat than by participating on Stack Exchange!

Josh first caught our attention on Meta, gaining the admiration and respect of us all by politely pointing out how incredibly wrong and delusional most of my opinions are. After a few months of respectable participation on Stack Overflow, he joined our site for questions about workplace and career-related issues and proved me wrong once again by helping the good folk there to push that site out of the beta doldrums and into graduation. He then proceeded to get himself elected as a moderator, where he continued to demonstrate the sort of dedication and tact that has been his hallmark.

Josh can usually be found in his natural habitats: at a baseball game somewhere in the world, sitting with a book in Ubud, or finding a local watering hole to escape the Japanese summer heat. Please join me in toasting to his health as he takes on this new challenge.


Do you have a unique set of skills that would benefit the growing communities here on Stack Exchange? We’re always looking for more help, and would love to hear from you – whether you’re near our NYC HQ or anywhere else in the world. You get to work with enthusiastic folks like Josh and help us guide Stack Exchange as it grows!

45 comments

Podcast #60: Are We That Predictable?

posted under by on 07-16-14 22

Welcome to Stack Exchange Podcast episode number 60, brought to you by The National Pepperjack Cheese Council. Your hosts today are Joel Spolsky, Jay Hanlon, and David Fullerton (aka Fake Producer Abby).

Stack Exchange PodcastWe’ll jump right into things with Community Milestones, but we promise to make them quick.

  • Puzzling is now in public beta, and it’s about puzzles.
  • Data Science (DAY-ta, not DAH-ta) is in public beta, and doing better than that topic’s previous iterations.
  • Craft CMS, yet another CMS site, is now in public beta as well.
  • Buddhism is now also in – surprise! – public beta.
  • Last one: Hinduism is in public beta as well.

Whew. Time to let Uncle David walk us through about a hundred new features that have launched since our last podcast.

  • Curtail Recidivism of Q-Blocked/Suspended Accounts on Deletion. This is exactly what it sounds like (unless it sounds like nonsense). This makes it so that people who are blocked or suspended can no longer delete their accounts and create a new, non-suspended account.
  • New badges: CuriousInquisitive, and Socratic. These badges go to folks with a consistent pattern of asking good questions, which we hope will help encourage our users to ask more questions.
  • We redesigned the Stack Exchange homepage… again. (The pendulum swings.) Make it your homepage! (Or don’t.)
  • We also redesigned the Hiring page. You should come work with us!
  • And we redesigned the mobile website, which you can check out by visiting any Stack Exchange site from your mobile device (unless it’s a BlackBerry).
  • The Community Bulletin got redesigned as well.
  • Careers got a new feature, too: City Pages.

And that’s everything we’ve done for the last few months, except for the secret stuff David won’t tell us about.

It’s time for our Featured Community. This time around it’s User Experience!

It’s time to talk about quality again. Jay is hopeful, because we had a great fight about this last time. Briefly: the perceived quality on Stack Overflow has been in decline for years. And this time, we’ve got numbers and things. Our current homepage algorithm was actively highlighting unanswered questions. We did this on purpose, but that was a long time ago. The effect of that system is that unanswerable questions stay on the homepage, because the average and good ones get answered almost immediately. So it makes Stack Overflow look like a site full of bad, unanswered questions.

So here’s the new recommended tab. It’s doing two things:

  1. Not filtering out unanswered stuff.
  2. Weighting toward the tags that you’re interested in, but now with more randomness.

You see a broader distribution of stuff. It’s not perfect, and that’s why it’s a little hidden for now, but we’ll keep working on it!

The other angle we’re attacking this from is the low-quality algorithm. Or rather, the quality score algorithm. (The algorithm itself is very high quality.) We did some science and we threw a bunch of data into Vowpal Wabbit(not a typo) and built a predictor of question quality, which has given us lots of interesting information to work with. We can use hard blocks and warnings to teach people asking questions things like “add some code!” or “make sure you explain what your code is doing!”. But we don’t want to just tell people not to use certain words, because then they’re only learning not to say “thanks”, not how to write a good question. So the low quality algorithm can flag your question to be sent to a review queue before it can show up on the homepage. Probably. (This is all still up for debate.)

This is primarily a Stack Overflow thing, so Meta Stack Overflow is the best place to discuss it. Have at it!

And finally, we’ll discuss the most important meta post of all.

Thanks for listening to Stack Exchange Podcast #60, brought to you by the National Pepperjack Cheese Council! We’ll see you next time.

22 comments

Podcast #59 – The Decline and Fall of Stack Overflow

posted under by on 05-29-14 47

Welcome to the 59th running of the Stack Exchange podcast, brought to you by Nutella! Your hosts Joel Spolsky, David Fullerton, and Jay Hanlon are joined this week by special guests Josh Heyer (aka Shog9) and Robert Cartaino (aka Robert Cartaino) of the Stack Exchange Community Growth team.

We’ve got a busy podcast scheduled, so let’s get down to business, starting with New Features with Uncle David.

Now we’ll come back around to Jay’s Boring Stuff, aka Community Milestones.

  • Data Science and Puzzling were in private beta at the time of this recording, and by the time we posted this, Puzzling had moved to public beta.

And now we get to switch over to our Big Meaty Topic for the day. At Stack Exchange (and particularly on Stack Overflow), we get a lot of complaints about quality declining on our sites. We split MSO and MSE, which gave people a chance to talk about their feelings (which is what we intended) and gave rise to questions like “Why is Stack Overflow so negative of late?“. It got a lot of interesting answers and comments.

Essentially, we are scaring legitimate, thoughtful people away from getting help. That’s one side of the problem. Additionally, some of our best users are getting more frustrated than we want them to be and (importantly) expressing that it’s hard for them to find questions that they want to answer. That part is something we can actually do something about.

Joel has two very very simple proposals to solve this problem.

  1. When a question gets upvoted by a user with x reputation (or maybe just upvoted), that upvote buys it y more impressions on the front page than the standard rate. Demonstrably good questions get more eyeballs than questions that haven’t been demonstrated to be good.
  2. Users that are relatively trusted by the system get more impressions on the front page for their questions. If you have a couple hundred reputation and you seem like a trusted user, your question gets more eyeballs.

Better questions get more eyeballs and therefore have a better chance of being answered well. Tune in for extensive discussion of the nuances and issues involved in Question Neutrality.

Thanks for listening to Stack Exchange Podcast #59, brought to you by Nutella!

47 comments

Podcast #58 – Pack ‘Em In Like Bees

posted under by on 05-19-14 15

Welcome to Stack Exchange Podcast #58 brought to you by the Stack Exchange iOS app! Our hosts Joel Spolsky, David Fullerton, and Jay Hanlon are joined this week by our guests, the Stack Exchange Design Team: Jin Yang, Stéphane “The French Guy” Martin, Courtny Cotten, and Josh Hynes.

Let’s kick things off with Community Milestones (assuming Joel knows where he is).

New Features

  • The iPhone app is coming! [Ed: it has now been released!]
  • We’re also working on instant automagical refresh in the apps.
  • The MSO/MSE split happened! But we already talked about it.
  • We’re busy breaking Super User by trying to migrate it over to CloudFlare.
  • Coming soon… Careers 2.0 City Pages!

Community of the Week: Travel

And now we turn to our special guests! Jin Yang is the founding member of the design team. Stéphane Martin is the French guy, and he’s in the U.S. for the first time! Courtny Cotten is from Indiana, and Josh Hynes is from Pennsylvania. Those places aren’t as cool as France (apparently).

So, what does the design team do? Jin gives us his memorized elevator pitch for what Stack Exchange designers do all day. (It includes beer pong, but probably not in the way you’re thinking.) Stéphane designed the new look and feel for Academia and tells us about the process creating the look and feel for that fully graduated community. Courtny’s worked on the new Careers 2.0 city pages, and Careers search results. Josh worked on reporting, messaging for Careers, and the new user profile page on the Q&A sites. Both of them are working on new features for Careers right now. We also delve deeper into Stack Exchange design culture and history. Anecdotes! Anecdotes galore!

Thanks for listening to Stack Exchange Podcast #58, brought to you by our iOS app… and Jay’s crappy Batman drawing.

15 comments