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Podcast #51 – The Return of Coding Horror

08-05-13 by . 18 comments

Welcome to Stack Exchange Podcast #51, with special guest Jeff Atwood and the usual suspects Joel Spolsky, David Fullerton, and Jay Hanlon. Today’s show was brought to you by Pan-American World Airways!

  • We kick off the discussion with a topic not on the agenda… which is reminiscing about who used to prepare the agenda on the old Joel & Jeff podcasts.
  • Site Milestones! Spaaaace is now in public beta, so you should check it out. We also closed the India proposal, after much discussion about the possibilities for location-based sites.
  • Five years ago today (7/31) was the start of the Stack Overflow private beta! (It’s also Harry Potter’s birthday.)
  • We have a new feature starting this week: featured sites! We’ll grab the most interesting questions from a particular site to highlight the things people might not be aware of. This week, we’re highlighting Open Data. “What’s open data, Jay?” Glad you asked! It’s a site for developers and researchers who are trying to use publicly available data to translate it into more functional systems. (We make our data available, too.) We were reached out to by the contractor running data.gov - neat!
  • We did a minor feature tweak: a new privilege. At 500 rep, you get access to the Late Answers and First Posts review queues. Congratulations!
  • We’re working on an Android app. You can help test it! We’ve started rolling it out to alpha testers. It’s mostly functional – you can view questions, ask, answer, comment, vote, and view your inbox. (Ben wrote a great blog post about what he learned while developing for Android – you should read it.)
  • Let’s turn to our special guest Jeff Atwood. He’s got many honorifics, and Jay got most of them wrong. Jeff has young children, and our hosts have lots of opinions about child things.
  • So! Jeff’s new project is Discourse. Like Stack Overflow, Discourse was born from the negative experience of having to go to ugly, nonfunctional places on the internet because you have to. Jeff walks us through the process of refining this idea and creating the product and highlights some of its best features.
    • Here’s the link to Jeff’s presentation at ForumCon.
    • Side note: Forums and chat systems are incredibly similar, with one key difference: on a forum, you type in a complete thought. In a chat system, you write in half-clauses, and maybe three or four messages together make a thought.
    • Discourse is an instant improvement over many commenting systems (as opposed to forum systems). It was never intended to compete with Disqus, but that’s how BoingBoing is using it and it seems to be working well.
  • Jeff is looking for three major partners. He’s got two already. Listen in to hear the Stack Exchange exclusive on the third Discourse partner! (DISCLAIMER: there is no actual announcement.)

Thanks for listening to the Stack Exchange podcast featuring Jeff Atwood! Check out BoingBoing’s forums or How-To Geek’s forums to see Discourse in action. Until next time!

Filed under podcasts

18 Comments

Love to see Jeff back on one of these; looking forward to listening. Discourse is a phenomenal project that will surely replace the PHPBBs out in the wild. And as always, it’s so well built.

That song at the end is awesome. Is that the Stack Exchange theme song?

The link to Ben’s Android development post isn’t working for me.

That’s funny but not fair. To all indians: I love india (although I never was there).. You are very polite and nice people!

Happy Birthday from Stage.

Giri Aug 5 2013

One thing I am not clear is how discourse is different from these wordpress forums?

Can startups use any of these features with limitations? I hope they won’t be considered as small business.

about India, that’s not fair

@Ben. Works for me. Check again.

onABoat Aug 6 2013

U should really put a compressor on the recordings to flatten out the volume spikes in your guys speak volume, also maybe turn down on the cut off.

AlbeyAmakiir Aug 6 2013

Still want statistics on how the name of the last podcast affected the listener count.

Thenrich Aug 6 2013

When Jeff doesn’t like a few features in a software, the whole software sucks for him. Few forum software from years ago where you have to search your post to see if someone replied exist now. Nowadays forums email you reply notifications. Either lame forums use lame forum software or the host is lazy to use something better. Most forum software are free and open source.

Even stackoverflow has a feature that sucks in my opinion. You can’t post a question which might produce anything resembling a list of good answers. So no “What’s a good x to y” type of questions. I questioned a few features on meta and got enough downvotes from meta sheeple to ban me from asking again (this was cleared later). That’s another feature that sucks because it can’t differentiate between abusers or someone who is just active and has ideas most people don’t agree with.
At least the stackechange people weren’t hard headed and eventually introduced the “on hold” question status.

As for the comment about clicking to collapse a non-interesting thread which Jeff says is an extra effort. Which is faster? Clicking to collapse a multipage thread and getting the next reply to your eye level or scrolling down.. scrolling down.. scrolling down trying to find the end of the thread? Yeah.. web usability is a subjective matter.

The current forum software can be improved a lot with some basic usability enhancements. I don’t understand why their developers are not improving them quickly enough.

I wish Jeff good luck with Discource. Will it displace the current forums software, time will tell.

rgripper Aug 7 2013

I also find these comment plugins on some third party websites glaring. The first seconds I see it thinking: “OMG! My avatar’s here, I must have already posted something I have no idea why”.

Ugh, just-in-time loading. I *hate* this. I HATE it with a firey passion. Ever since Facebook took all their photo and activity lists and replaced the pagination with a slow, buggy, never-ending stream of crap that I can’t seek through at will but have to painstakingly load one “segment” at a time, even if I know that what I want is right at the end. Please don’t be part of — nay, encourage — this horrendous trend, Jeff. PLEASE.

Jeff returns, and all of a sudden the deep, focused discussion that was great about the Stack Overflow podcast is back.

Stack Exchange podcast’s recurring theme “oh man, this is so bad, we cannot use *any* of this” never happened with Jeff. He was driving this show without being aware of it.

> Can startups use any of these features with limitations?

Of course, Discourse is 100% open source (GPL v2) software now and forever:

https://github.com/discourse/discourse

> Either lame forums use lame forum software

But nobody is upgrading all these “lame” forums and they seem content to sit at the old version basically forever. Another problem within the forum industry is massive resistance to any change, even a “minor” upgrade to a newer, slightly-less-sucky version of the forum software they already use.

But do watch the first 10-15 minutes of this, if you can:

http://blog.discourse.org/2013/06/forums-are-dead-long-live-forums/

Ortzinator Aug 7 2013

@Thenrich: That’s not a “feature”, that’s a type of question that the community has explicitly decided to not allow and for good reasons. And abusers are accounted for because downvoting sacrifices some of your own rep.

Unfortunately, cannot agree to you on Disqus. Never really liked it, not nice, not cool – just nothing. I like more vBulletin, interface is clear and understandable. Comments and the blog itself look cool.

As for me, I prefer more Discourse that WordPress. And I cannot say why – it’s how I feel about it. The post is nice, I’m glad you are back, I enjoyed reading the article.