site title

Stack Exchange’s Greatest Hits

02-24-12 by . 11 comments

We have a lot of Q&A sites in the Stack Exchange network now. 84 at the current moment. That’s … a lot of Q&A sites. But most people* don’t find us by browsing the site directory; they find us by encountering a Stack Exchange page in their web search results.

So that may lead you to wonder: what are the most freqently found questions on a given Stack Exchange Q&A site? In other words, the “Greatest Hits” of that particular topic.



(Trivia: did you know that the Eagles’ Greatest Hits doesn’t include their most famous song?)

How do we, as community members, tell which questions are getting the most airplay, are the figurative “Bicycling’s Greatest Hits” or “RPG’s Greatest Hits” of our community? We have a page for this:

stackoverflow.com/questions/greatest-hits
superuser.com/questions/greatest-hits
serverfault.com/questions/greatest-hits
gaming.stackexchange.com/questions/greatest-hits
askubuntu.com/questions/greatest-hits
apple.stackexchange.com/questions/greatest-hits

Yep, just add /questions/greatest-hits to the address bar of any Stack Exchange site.

The [Greatest Hits page] divides the number of page views on a question by the total amount of anonymous question and answer feedback received (adding a bonus for high view counts). We exclude questions with less views than the median view count for the entire site.

For better or worse, these questions are what the world will see and remember your site for, and a big reason why popularity can be surprisingly troublesome.

We haven’t been publicizing the Greatest Hits page much to date because it relies heavily on a feature we only introduced about 6 months ago: anonymous user feedback. If you visited a Stack Exchange question as an anonymous user, there wasn’t much you could do other than answer it. So we added a feedback option under each post.

What we quickly learned is that anonymous users aren’t particularly, uh … talkative. Statistically speaking, they very rarely click these feedback buttons — and when they do, it’s often because the post itself is getting a lot of views. So you need quite a bit of time before you can even begin looking at anonymous user feedback, and it’s frequently only useful on large sites, or the super popular questions.

We now have a reasonable amount of anonymous user feedback after 6+ months. Enough to take action. We ought to be looking at the Greatest Hits for our sites every so often and actively tending to these highly visible questions and answers — because they truly represent how the world sees your site!

I sometimes go through and “touch up” the questions on the Greatest Hits list to make sure they’re as great as they should be. I’d encourage everyone in the community to do the same. Periodically check the Greatest Hits and see if these questions should represent what your site is all about; edit, vote, comment, and flag to ensure that the quality and relevancy of these questions and answers is making your site look as great to the outside world as you know it is.

Remember, if you’re not careful, you could end up like Chuck Berry — a rock legend who will forever be remembered for his only number one hit … “My Ding-A-Ling”.

* this is hardly new news, but for the year of 2011, Google delivered 91% of all incoming traffic to Stack Overflow. It’s not quite as high for Stack Exchange, “only” around 70-80%.

Filed under reference, stackexchange

11 Comments

Also, if you have 10k rep, you’ll definitely want to check out

/tools/post-feedback

which has some extremely useful views of anonymous feedback, such as “underrated” and “overrated”, where the anonymous feedback is outpacing official voting by a lot. One I find particularly useful is questions with no answers that have negative anonymous feedback.

Sweet! For someone with relatively low reputation (822), I’m proud to say I have 4 selected answers out of the 1000 hits on Stack Overflow :) Cool feature!

Ben Brocka Feb 24 2012

Sweet! Just yesterday I was wondering what/if you guys publicly shared of the anonymous feedback.

soandos Feb 24 2012

There is an age problem that is not controlled for. Given that the older posts have had more time to accrue more views etc, even as they go obsolete, they will remain there, making it harder for newer, more relevant stuff to get to the top. SU for example has a bunch of posts from 2009. Not the most relevant posts on SU.

As I recall, I believe the page already divides the viewcount by the creation date of the post, but Sam will have to clarify.

Eric K. Feb 24 2012

I love the feature, but wow… Based on the results you should rename ‘gaming’ SE to ‘skyrim’ SE. :)

Tim Post Feb 24 2012

It looks like the feedback on zero score questions might be compelling enough to start raising moderator flags, combined with other criteria of course.

Have you considered this? Or do you think more data would be needed before considering it? It seems like the signal is pulling up the floor boards and revealing everything that fell though the cracks.

Emmie MC Feb 26 2012

Hi. :) I’ve been looking around the StackExchange page trying to find a place to suggest a new site, but I’m just not seeing it. I was wondering if there were any plans to make a Chemistry site? I’m more than willing to bully some of my fellow grad students into answering questions. :)

Kyralessa Mar 5 2012

It appears that gaming.stackexchange.com will be remembered for nothing but Skyrim.

This is simply a fantastic feature, it lets you read Best of StackOverFlow quickly.