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Archive for January, 2012

The Trouble With Popularity

01-31-12 by Jeff Atwood. 50 comments

Way back in 2008, we had Alexis Ohanian and Steve Huffman, the founders and co-creators of Reddit, on the Stack Overflow podcast. We chatted about a bunch of stuff, but one of the things they said that always stuck with me was that Reddit always took an explicitly hands-off, no moderation approach to their content from the very beginning.

I found that a bit shocking, since I’ve… never seen that work. Certainly on Stack Overflow and Stack Exchange we are very much pro-moderation — and more so with every passing year. We have literally hundreds of community moderators. We spend a ton of time appointing and electing moderators, as well as conducting weekly moderator chats in the Teacher’s Lounge chatroom, and emailing all our mods a monthly moderator newsletter.

The Reddit founders maintained that evil things which require active moderation didn’t happen too often, provided you build the right kind of community voting and flagging mechanisms. I can agree with that. We’ve found that to be true on Stack Exchange as well. It’s almost enough to make you a believer in the fundamental goodness of human beings.

Almost.

But there’s a deeper, more insidious problem that creeps into systems when the community is unmoderated. Stuff like, say, compilable James Bond Java ASCII art

… or mountain-climbing Skyrim horses and wounded Skyrim NPCs with vivid imaginations.

Let us not forget the classics, either:

… and so, so many more.

These sorts of posts are wildly popular with the community. The cartoon question alone had over a million views by our extremely strict view counter — which easily translates to at least two million views, possibly three million. We don’t hate fun here, but we discovered that these posts become so popular over time that they truly start to drown out everything else on the site.

Ironically, the Reddit community itself now recognizes that moderation is fundamental and essential:

One thing thing that does concern me, however, is that [as this subreddit gets more popular] the amount of image macros, memes, rage comics and generally low-quality content hitting the front page has grown to annoying proportions.

The problem with image macros and rage comics (besides generally lacking wit or anything genuinely insightful) is that they’re quick and easy to digest, and thus tend to get upvoted faster than self posts and actual discussions which take thought and time before an appropriate response can meted out. If you’re not careful you end up with something akin to /r/gaming, which is now a burbling, deformed wreck of its former self, with anything remotely resembling intelligent discussion being buried under a sea of vacuous meme-repetition.

In my view what this subreddit needs is a touch more moderation to ensure that we don’t end up with a front page full of imgur/memegenerator links, and that people who want to use this subreddit as a medium to discuss the [topic] can do so without having to sift through the crap with a shovel.

This is as clear a call for active moderation as I’ve ever seen. And the moderators, to their credit, took charge and instituted changes to help guide their community away from the fatty junk food content:

We’ve heard your concerns over the direction the community is heading. We were hoping we could ride it out and things would balance themselves, but it just isn’t working, and things need to change. It’s plain to see that meme-based content attracts many upvotes, and we all love a good laugh, but it is not what we want this community to be. But this isn’t just about memes, it’s about the general tone of the community. We’re making changes to our rules for posting, commenting, and voting here — necessary changes to make [this] the community we first envisioned.

This community is for sharing thought-provoking stories, high-level tactics discussions, videos/images of the awesomeness of [topic], suggestions or discussions on mechanics, and it can all be done without resorting to memes or complaining. Reddit never ceases to amaze, I expect to be surprised! If you have any questions, message the mods! We hope you agree and understand these changes.

We know that closing the cookie jar is painful. We feel your pain. Nobody likes having their fun taken away. But it’s too addictive and too easy, and in the absence of any moderation, the community would do nothing but add and upvote the easy, fun stuff.

This is why community moderators have real power; they need that power to intervene, educate, and refocus the community’s exuberance on more substantive content. People will fight you almost literally to the death over their right to be entertained, and to entertain others:

Why can’t you just not look at these fun posts? Why do they have to be deleted? You guys suck!

The same reason the moderators and community on that subreddit didn’t decide to “not look” at the fun posts, really:

  1. Broken windows. Every ‘fun’ post users see is an open invitation for them to participate in the fun by adding their own fun question or answer. The stuff spreads like kudzu! Pretty soon the entire site is overrun with nothing but that kind of fun. And even if you grandfather a few in, you’ll enjoy neverending requests asking why their fun question or answer has to be removed, while this one over here is allowed to remain. 
  2. Opportunity cost. Every minute spent participating in an entertaining ‘fun’ post is time that someone could have spent asking or answering a substantive question, something practical that solves an actual problem for hundreds or thousands of people. Entertainment, within reason, is by no means a bad thing — but I experience almost physical pain when I think about a brilliant topic expert spending 10 minutes on one of our sites deciding which hilarious cartoon is their favorite.

Popularity is a tough thing. I’m tempted to call it a curse, but what we try to do at Stack Exchange is make sure that questions and answers are popular for the right reasons — because they are amazing resources for learning from your peers. If you want to slip a few jokes in there with the learning, that’s fine, but when the question devolves into little more than entertainment, I hope you can understand why our community moderators are obliged to step in and protect the community from, well … itself.

Welcome Valued Associates Anna, Rachel, CarleeJean and Charles!

01-26-12 by Alison Sperling. 6 comments
Anna Lear is joining the Stack Exchange Team as a Community Manager working remotely from Ontario Canada. Many of you may know or recognize her from her role as a Programmers moderator, and – most recently – Stack Overflow moderator. Anna is a software developer and a longtime SO user. In her spare time she writes code for fun, plays video games, occasionally acts on stage, and tries to carve out time to learn guitar as well.
Anna Lear

The Stack Overflow Careers Sales Team welcomes three new members to Stack Exchange’s NYC office!

Rachel Boyman was born & raised in Michigan.  Rachel has a background in media and she loves to read books, magazines and newspapers the “old school” way.  In her spare time, Rachel enjoys travelling, especially to Michigan games (Go Blue!), practicing yoga and exploring NYC.

Rachel Boyman

CarleeJean Cook originally hails from Denver, so needless to say she’s an avid skier.  Although she’s quite cooped up in NYC’s concrete jungle, CarleeJean makes the most of her time indoors; she’s a conferences/professional events junkie and has taken courses to become a wine sommelier.  During the summer months, CarleeJean loves living on the Jersey Shore.

CarleeJean Cook

New Jersey born and raised, Charles Bernoskie spent his college years in Washington D.C. playing baseball for Georgetown University.  When he’s not at work or spending time outdoors, Charles loves reading reddit and also epic fantasy series novels.  Charles is particular about his beverages, preferring black coffee and craft beers.

Charles Bernoskie

Welcome Anna, Rachel, CarleeJean and Charles!

State of the Stack 2011 (a message from your CEO)

01-16-12 by Joel Spolsky. 13 comments

2011 was another year of fantastic growth at Stack Exchange. We continued our tradition of doubling every year, going from 16 million to over 32 million monthly visitors. We added 42 new sites, bringing us to a grand total of 78. We hired 22 new employees, and raised another $12 million in venture capital, some of which was invested in a remote-controlled, floating shark and clownfish for the office.

We’re now ranked #160 on Quantcast, which makes me wonder if maybe our big goal of becoming a “top 50 site on the Internet” was perhaps not ambitious enough. And the question and answer quality throughout our network is still rock solid, with 93% of questions getting at least one upvoted or accepted answer.

Anyway, we did one of those fun infographics you kids like so much, to highlight some of the accomplishments of the last year in vivid color, so check it out for more details.

Stack Exchange Data Explorer 2.0

01-15-12 by Sam Saffron. 4 comments

It has been a year and a half since we launched Data Explorer. In the past few months Tim Stone (on a community grant) and I have pushed a major round of changes. Thanks Tim!

Recap on last years changes

Since we publicly launched data explorer, the most notable change contributed back from the community was support for query plans, big thanks to Justin for submitting the patch.

We also added quite a few bug fixes/features, mostly around merging users. Some features were added to defend data.se against an onslaught of public queries. A few features were added to support non Stack Exchange data dumps, most notably a system for white listing. Our very own Rebecca Chernoff ported Data Explorer to ASP.NET MVC3 amongst many other fixes.

The current round of changes offers some very cool new functionality, which is worth listing:

Query revisions

When we created Data Explorer there was no way to track a query’s “lineage”. This was particularly problematic because we had no way of updating featured queries or shared queries. Even I complained about this on meta.

The new pipeline works just like Gist, you can track the history of your query as you are editing (attributing the various editors along the way):


You can link to a specific revision, or simply share a “query set” by using the permalink. By sharing a “query set” you can later on fix up any issues the query has, without needing to update the link. The new pipeline allows you to “fork” any query created by other users and tracks attribution along the way.

Graphs

We added some basic graphing facilities, supporting 2 types of line graphs:

The first type is a simple graph, where the first column represents the X-axis and the other columns the data points. For example: a graph of questions and answers per month.

The second type is a bit trickier, it unpivots the second column in the result set. For example: a graph of questions per tag for top 10 tags.

Huge open source upgrade

Data Explorer consumes a fair amount of open source libraries. In the past year and a half many have evolved. We took the time to upgrade them all.

The excellent Code Mirror was updated to the 2.0 version, the new version no longer uses messy iframes. Marjin wrote a great post explaining the changes, a fantastic read for any JavaScript developers.

SlickGrid, which in my opinion is the best grid control built on jQuery, was upgraded to version infinity.

100% more Dapper

Dapper our open source micro ORM is the only ORM Data Explorer uses. We took the time to port the entire solution to Dapper. I even added a few CRUD helpers so you are not stuck hard coding INSERT and UPDATE statements everywhere.

Data Explorer is a good open source example of how we code web sites at Stack Overflow. It is built on our stack using many of our helpers. Dapper and related helpers are used for data access. It uses the same homebrew migration system we use in production and an interesting asset packaging system I wrote (for the record, Ben wrote a much more awesome one that we use in production, lobby him to get it blogged). It also uses MiniProfiler for profiling. MiniProfiler is even enabled in production, so go have a play.

Lots of smaller less notable fixes

  • We now have a concept of “user preferences”, so we can remember which tab you selected, etc.
  • We remember the page you were at and try to redirect you there after you log on.
  • We attribute the query properly to the creator / editor from the query show page.
  • You can page through your queries on your user page.
  • Support for arbitrary hyperlinks
  • Revamped object browser, you can collapse table definitions
  • Lots of other stuff I forgot :)

You too can run Data Explorer

At Stack Exchange we run 3 different instances of Data Explorer. We have the public Data Explorer and a couple of private instances we use to explore other data sets. The first private instance is used for raw site database access. The other is used to browse through our haproxy logs.

There is nothing forcing you to point Data Explorer at a Stack Exchange data dump, the vast majority of the features work fine pointed at an arbitrary database.

Hope you enjoy this round of changes.

If there are any bugs or feature requests please post them to Meta Stack Overflow. Data Explorer is open source, patches welcome.

Hot Topics: A Contest Formula that Works

01-05-12 by Lauren Gundrum. 12 comments

CHAOS has been searching for the perfect way to promote activity on our sites for a while now. After all, before you can try to recruit new users, you need to engage your existing community. Since we’re a network of Q&A websites, a natural place to start is having question-asking contests. Some of our contests have been more successful than others, but it seems like we’ve finally found one that works:

What: Hot Topic of the Week

How it works: Pick a topic of the week, and enter everyone who asks a question related to that topic into a random drawing to win a prize. The number of entries a person gets is equal to the number of questions they ask about the topic of the week.

This is similar to the weekly topic challenge being held on Jewish Life & Learning, but adapted to a contest model. It’s pretty simple, but surprisingly effective, and there are a few key reasons why it works.

First of all, this contest incentivizes question-asking by offering a small prize, but the prize is not so large that it encourages users to cheat the system. The prize is randomly awarded, and you get more entries based on the number of questions you ask rather than the number of up votes you get, so there is no danger of sock puppet voting.  More importantly however, the topic of the week acts as an idea-generator; it gives people a specific topic to think about, and reminds them that they can ask questions about that topic (and other topics like it) on Stack Exchange. We’re always trying to come up with new ways to increase the amount of good content on our sites, and a contest makes asking questions more fun. A contest that increases the number of questions without threatening the quality of the information on our sites is the ideal way to go.

It’s important to remember that this contest will be better suited for some sites than others. For example, there are a greater number of possible topics for Literature and Philosophy (e.g. authors and philosophers) than there are for Apple and Android. However, that doesn’t mean the contest won’t have an effect on those sites.  The easiest way to maximize the effectiveness of this type of contest is to time it with the release of a hot new item. We recently ran Ice Cream Sandwich Week on Android (shortly after the Galaxy Nexus was released) and it was very successful. Before the start of the contest, there were 18 questions tagged “4.0-ice-cream-sandwich.”  That number more than doubled during Ice Cream Sandwich Week and continues to rise even after the contest is over. We did something similar on Literature by having Stieg Larsson Week close to the release of the US film adaptation of The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo.

If you don’t know what topics are hot right now, ask your community for suggestions. Active Stack Exchange users will know about exciting new releases and classic topics that everyone on their site will be familiar with. Keep in mind that there won’t be hot new items coming out every week though, so some topics will get more questions than others and you may need to tweak the rules to account for that.  In general, this contest has been pretty well-received and we will probably expand it to even more sites in the future. In the meantime, if you have ideas for a weekly topic challenge on your site, we encourage you to try it out and are happy to help with the little details.