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Careers 2.0: It’s About Reputation, Not “Rep”

I get an email like Arik‘s every day or two. He wrote:

The problem I see is that Careers 2.0 give advantage to developers with high Stack Overflow statistics (which I guess was the point, showing that you know stuff).

Unfortunately, SO succeeded so well, that practically no good question remained unanswered. Thus, gaining a respectful reputation in SO is practically impossible these days. Which gives an unfair advantage to veteran SO users.

First of all, whoa… have you seen the Stack Overflow homepage lately? We’re getting about 4,000—four thousand!—questions a day. There are puh-LENTY of opportunities to find a question to answer.

But more importantly, sheer reputation scores are not how Careers 2.0 works, and it’s not what Careers 2.0 hiring managers are looking for. What they want to see is a sample of your work. They don’t need to see your answers to 7000 questions—they want to see five really good ones.

A Careers 2.0 profile is designed to let you highlight your best software development work. You can link to open source projects, link to your favorite books, link to your blog posts, but most importantly, you can pick some of your favorite answers that you wrote on Stack Overflow and link to them. Four or five great answers is enough to prove to a recruiter that you know your stuff. (Here’s what my profile looks like. I’m not actually on the job market; please don’t try to hire me!)

If you want to build up a decent Careers 2.0 profile without spending hours a day, I recommend looking for five unanswered questions and just overkilling the answers. There are LOTS of easy questions on Stack Overflow. They tend to drive me crazy; many of them are “do my work for me” type questions. If we had a dollar for every time someone asked how to “replace a bunch of strings in a bunch of files with another bunch of strings, in Python” we wouldn’t have had to raise $18M in venture capital. There are hundreds of questions on Stack Overflow about how to replace strings. Some of them have good answers and some have bad answers but you know what I really want to see? A single, amazing, awesome, EPIC answer that kills this topic so well that it becomes the standard source on the Internet of how to write code that replaces strings. It might start with an exploration of how to use sed and goes into Knuth-like detail on searching strings efficiently. Make your answer so amazing that it gets onto Hacker News and gets dozens of upvotes. This is your chance to write one great answer which is going to prove to a hiring manager somewhere that you deserve an interview.

The theme of Stack Overflow is being awesome. Learning, teaching, and, at Careers 2.0, demonstrating your awesomeness. It’s not about hiring managers who want to hire the people with the most points… it’s about letting hiring managers see who you really are instead of just being a list of previous employers and schools.

Filed under careers

14 Comments

Chris Lutz Aug 10 2011

A dozen upvotes isn’t cool. You know what’s cool? A hundred upvotes.

Joel doesn’t make this part of the argument but here it is anyway: It would be really dumb for us to build a careers service giving unfair advantage to the high rep stackoverflow users. There simply aren’t enough of them out there to make it worth our while (and a bunch of them already have great jobs so we’d just annoy the crap out of them).

We used to have a feature where employers could sort by reputation, but it was dumb dumb dumb! Employers would all try to contact the same set of people because high rep beat out all the other signals. We’ve since ripped that out for a better algorithm that takes a more well rounded approach to ranking candidates.

The lesson here is tag your careers profiles appropriately so we can give you proper credit for everything.

Chris Lutz Aug 10 2011

On a more serious note, might it not also be a good idea to let people highlight excellent questions they’ve asked? I’ve seen quite a few questions (and written one or two, in my humble opinion) that show more understanding of the language than many answers to far more simple questions (even answers from me sometimes).

Antony Aug 10 2011

@Chris – great idea. Then Joel can link ‘how to move the turtle’ in his profile

Now if only I could get an invitation to Careers 2.0!

Now if only I ever got anyone searching my resume on Careers… Also, it kinda sucks that it only shows the top percentages for SO, my best SE site is U&L . Careers would do better to allow for more than just programming.

Stefan Aug 10 2011

What? Your top questions don’t include http://stackoverflow.com/questions/1003841/how-do-i-move-the-turtle-in-logo.

I find that absurd.

Stefan Aug 10 2011

A bout of confusion. Top questions might also be useful.

Jeff, while I agree with pretty much everything in your article, you seem to have completely missed the point of the question that triggered it: It’s not about users being afraid to have a low SO rep listed on their Careers 2.0 page. It’s about them not being able to even have a listing in the first place because they lack the rep points to receive an invite.

David Fullerton Aug 11 2011

@Oliver If you’re looking for an invite, fill out the form at http://careers.stackoverflow.com/cv/get-one. Even if you don’t have high rep, if you can link to some awesome answers you’ve given or other stuff you’ve done you’ll get an invite.

We used to have a feature where employers could sort by reputation, but it was dumb dumb dumb! Employers would all try to contact the same set of people because high rep beat out all the other signals. We’ve since ripped that out for a better algorithm that takes a more well rounded approach to ranking candidates.

And guess why that feature existed? Because employers asked for it… clearly part of the challenge of careers is educating employers.

Andomar Aug 11 2011

By any measurement, Stack Overflow is closer to a forum than to a wikipedia. 95% of activity is on new topics, and even the top questions die within a few hours. Wikipedia is about building a knowledge base, with 95% of activity on topics that are years old.

You can easily verify this on SE data.

@David: Thanks, but I already got my profile way back when they were free to get. Didn’t know about the get-one form. That certainly kind of evaporates my argument… ;)

I wish I could upvote Caleb’s comment … “Careers would do better to allow for more than just programming.”

I know you folks have a lot going on, but this is the next announcement I’m really looking for. Careers for other Stacks.