site title

Stack Exchange Traffic Still Growing

We had a crazy month last month, growing about 18% across the board. Today I was excited to log onto Quantcast, which measures our traffic, to see that for the first time, our network rank now fits into a single unsigned byte!

There are several different ways we measure our traffic, and each of them gets vastly different results. For example, Quantcast puts us as 14.1 million people a month (globally). They measure that using a little JavaScript widget you’ll find at the bottom of the HTML on every one of our pages.

Quantcast doesn’t provide very robust measurement tools, so we use Google Analytics (“GA”) for internal tracking. GA has great reporting features, but there is one major difference in the methodology: if the same person visits stackexchange.com and superuser.com, for example, because of the way cookies work, GA considers that to be two unique visitors. So with GA we end up “overcounting” people if they visit more than one of our domains. We decided that was OK for our own internal tracking. Someone who visits superuser.com AND serverfault.com is worth “twice as much” as someone who only visits one site.

Also, for reasons we have never figured out, Google Analytics just gets larger numbers than Quantcast. Right now GA is showing more visitors (15 million) on stackoverflow.com alone than Quantcast sees on the whole network:

Why? I don’t know. Either Google Analytics loses cookies sometimes, or Quantcast misses visitors. Counting is an inexact science.

As I said, for our own purposes, we decided to sum up all the GA visitors numbers on the six top level domains we operate, which puts as at about 24 million unique visitors.

The one source that’s absolute, complete rubbish is compete.com. They seem to think that we only have 659,000 visitors to stackoverflow.com and that we’re shrinking. This “data” is so utterly and completely out of whack with every other source that actually measures our traffic that I just don’t know what to make of it.

The fact that they manage to be off by a factor of 22, and that they think we’re shrinking when everyone else (Quantcast, Google Analytics, even Alexa with their goofy toolbar methodology) has measured us as growing, makes me wonder just what the heck is going on at compete.com. To put it politely.

Filed under stackexchange

17 Comments

Richard Gadsden Apr 12 2011

Could the difference be as simple as that more people have Google unblocked in NoScript than quantcast, or is NoScript not pervasive enough?

Can you get any data from analyzing your server logs?

Sorry about deleting my cookies so much and throwing off your metrics. Seriously though, Except for a few whitelisted sites (google not included), I have configured my browser to delete all cookies every time I restart my browser. I’m guessing a lot of other stackoverflow users have things configured the same way. Also javascript blocking seems to be quite popular these days. It’s always important to remember that with web analytics of any kind, the numbers aren’t completely accurate.

These tests are never accurate. See this http://www.johnsankey.ca/visitors.html
I don’t know why people look at these stats so much and then to compare with GA and compete.com, it’s not worth it. You have a good business model, a strong team, and you’re exciting to keep moving ahead.
Push the numbers aside for the time being. Numbers are never constant, look at wall street, look at gas prices. We have our good days vs. our bad days. Just keep to the plan and like some say ‘get her done!’

I’d love to know the browser / platform mix on (some of) your stats- be interesting to compare and contrast with what OReilly reports.

Joel Coehoorn Apr 12 2011

@JonH – It’s simple. Those numbers feed directly into how much pull you have with advertisers. They translate directly to $$.

Like Adam said, what do your server logs say? Thats the only true measure in my book…

@Kolchy: server logs are likely to undercount since they don’t see content delivered by proxies or views of pages cached by the browser. JavaScript techniques can mitigate this although, as others have pointed out, are subject to inaccuracies of their own.

SO surely has a huge number of its own metrics that are far more useful: number of registered users, number of questions asked, frequency of answers, etc.

Also, I would have thought that discrepancies between analytics services can be explained by many factors, including what they define as a ‘visit’. For example, a session will time out after some period of inactivity and register as a new ‘visit’; that timeout period will vary between services.

We try to look at visiTORS, not visits. Server logs don’t necessarily help because they still rely on cookies placed in a browser to identify unique users.

Congratulations Joel! 14+ million visitors and an 8-bit rank are quite an achievement. GA counts 30% more unique visitors on our site than the Comscore Direct beacon. Google bought Urchin to give away as GA so businesses could track their AdWords campaigns, so they have no incentive to aggressively filter out people with multiple browsers or devices.

FWIW – I use the following two scripts to analyze my servers (running Apache on CentOS)

********
the daily edition
********

#! /bin/bash
# dumps potentially useful, semi-processed raw data about
# apache logs – unique ip addresses and timestamps for each request
# written by warren m myers
# last updated 20081031@1014
# usage:
# ipcount logfile1 [logfile 2 [logfile 3...]]
# example:
# ls *log | xargs ipcount
#
# this version only cares about access from today’s date

DAY=`date +%d`
MONTH=`date +%b`
YEAR=`date +%Y`

until [ -z "$1" ] # Until all parameters used up . . .
do
echo $1
printf “\tUnique IP addresses:\t”
grep $DAY $1 | grep $MONTH | grep $YEAR | cut -d ‘ ‘ -f1 | sort -u | wc -l
printf “\tUnique timestamps:\t”
grep $DAY $1 | grep $MONTH | grep $YEAR | sort -uk4 | wc -l
echo
shift
done

********
and the full edition
********

#! /bin/bash
# dumps potentially useful, semi-processed raw data about
# apache logs – unique ip addresses and timestamps for each request
# written by warren m myers
# last updated 20081031@1030
# usage:
# ipcount logfile1 [logfile 2 [logfile 3...]]
# example:
# ls *log | xargs ipcount
#

until [ -z "$1" ] # Until all parameters used up . . .
do
echo $1
printf “\tUnique IP addresses:\t”
cut -d ‘ ‘ -f1 $1 | sort -u | wc -l
printf “\tUnique timestamps:\t”
sort -uk4 $1 | wc -l
echo
shift
done

Warren – unfortunately they’re using IIS.

I get 20,000 page views a month for a non-important coding site, but 10,000 are from 2 of the 50 or so pages and I’ve earned $3 in 2 years of hosting from google ads. I wonder how accurate those GA stats are and how biased they might be towards Google selling impression figures to their banner click empire.

@Chris – did you have to pay taxes on the 3 bucks ?
If that is all you earned it’s probably best to get rid of the ads.

R. Bemrose Apr 14 2011

I guess I’m not counted at all, since I the Firefox plugin Ghostery to block things like Google Analytics and Quantcast.

See related question on webmasters about accepted cookie-to-user ratios. Some great answers.

http://webmasters.stackexchange.com/questions/12195/standard-ratio-of-cookies-to-visitors

Would love to see what Alexa says about this — you said they show you growing, but how accurate are they for total numbers when compared to GA and Quantcast?