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Real Questions Have Answers

01-17-11 by . 14 comments

In Good Subjective, Bad Subjective, we made a pretty solid first stab at defining a constructive subjective question, one that I’ve been happy with so far.

Constructive subjective questions:

  1. inspire answers that explain “why” and “how”.
  2. tend to have long, not short, answers.
  3. have a constructive, fair, and impartial tone.
  4. invite sharing experiences over opinions.
  5. insist that opinion be backed up with facts and references.
  6. are more than just mindless social fun.

But the six guidelines above depend partly on the questions, and partly on the answers. They’re a fine starting point for determining what a good subjective question generally looks like — but I couldn’t fully explain what makes a bad subjective question.

That was before I saw Aarobot’s epic meta answer on poll questions:

Should all poll questions be closed? That is where it starts to get dicey. For you see, the term “poll” is itself subjective, and whether or not a given question is in fact a poll is often open to debate.

For me, and I think I speak for many others, the only time you really know you’re looking at a poll is when you see those one-line answers. But we can only close questions. Is it always the fault of the questioner that the answers suck? Do they deserve all the blame for the fact that people with nothing useful to say want to participate anyway and bring their reddit-style “tweets” into the answers?

Sometimes the questions really are bad. When someone asks, Which programming language do you really hate?, and doesn’t bother to elaborate at all, that is just screaming for crap answers. It’s hard for me to begrudge any of those participants their answers (okay, maybe I begrudge them a little) because the question itself was so ridiculously open-ended that any answer would technically be a “correct” one.

Then again, some questions that are worded as very obvious polls actually get reasonably good, well-written answers. See Best practices that you disagree with for an example. On Seasoned Advice (Cooking.SE), I can point to several examples of weak questions or even joke questions that, given an early, comprehensive answer, did not devolve into pointless blathering. On the flip side, I’ve seen questions that were definitively not phrased as polls that were still greeted by dozens of poor-quality answers; take, for example, one of Stack Overflow’s oldest: Practical non-image based CAPTCHA approaches?

Recently I’ve actually taken to using Metafilter’s guidelines as a rule of thumb.

Yes, yes, it’s a long post, almost TL;DR, but it’s gold. Read it anyway. You may remember Aarobot from his previous discovery about meta-tags.

It should come as no surprise that MetaFilter, which has been doing high quality Q&A since 2004, figured this stuff out years ago. They’re a huge influence — up there with Wikipedia in my estimation. That’s why we had Josh Millard, a MetaFilter admin, on an early podcast.

I’m just kicking myself for not discovering the particular page Aarobot referenced until now. Effective immediately, the FAQ for all sites now includes specific guidance on what a bad subjective question looks like.

What kind of questions should I not ask here?

You should only ask practical, answerable questions based on actual problems that you face. Chatty, open-ended questions diminish the usefulness of our site and push other questions off the front page. To prevent your question from being flagged and possibly removed, avoid asking subjective questions where …

  • every answer is equally valid: “What’s your favorite ______?”
  • your answer is provided along with the question, and you expect more answers: “I use ______ for ______, what do you use?”
  • there is no actual problem to be solved: “I’m curious if other people feel like I do.”
  • we are being asked an open-ended, hypothetical question: “What if ______ happened?”
  • it is a rant disguised as a question: “______ sucks, am I right?”

If your motivation for asking the question is “I would like to participate in a discussion about ______”, then you should not be asking here. If your motivation is “I would like others to explain ______ to me”, then you are probably OK.

All based on the MetaFilter FAQ entry My Ask Metafilter question was removed as chatfilter. What does that mean?, with their explicit permission and proper attribution.

I realize this is a lot of rules, a lot of guidelines, a lot of thinking. But it’s simpler than it looks. As Aarobot said in his post: real questions have answers, not items or ideas or opinions.

14 Comments

Benjol Jan 17 2011

Aarobot, epic answer, tl;dr?

Whatever next?! :)

That said, I entirely agree, but I suspect that poll questions will keep coming, no matter how many times you lop off their heads.

How about a ‘fourth place’? :)

davidThomas Jan 17 2011

your answer is provided along with the question, in a variant of “I’ll go first”. If you can authoritatively answer, it’s not a real question.

Doesn’t that totally contradict the final sentence of the first section of the FAQ:

It’s also perfectly fine to ask and answer your own question, as long as you pretend you’re on Jeopardy: phrase it in the form of a question.

Or should there be some form of courteous “no, you first” time delay between the asking and answering?

(…gosh, I wish there was a preview-comment button. The suspense of wondering if the mark-up is allowed is…weird.)

Browsing around the many, many, stacks that exist now; the creation of serverfault, programmers, wordpress, android etc, etc; seems to have created a new niche of troll like moderators who move posts from Stackoverflow, the once concentrated mass of users and questions, into these varied holes of marginalisation.

WordPress posts for instance would previously have been seen by the thousands of PHP users who trawl stackoverflow; now its seen by around 1200 users a day…

Who cares if a question isn’t written properly, people come to these sites to get answers.

The cooking & photography sections were good examples of new stacks; but separating off android/wordpress etc from the stack has created a dilution in the knowledge pool, and thats a real shame.

I like that this is now part of the FAQ, but we’ll no longer have a list of alternative sites?

How about questions like http://stackoverflow.com/questions/1711/what-is-the-single-most-influential-book-every-programmer-should-read ? I think that’s an incredibly useful resource.

It would be a shame if those kinds of questions were banned wholesale. (I know the majority are rubbish, but don’t throw the baby out with the bathwater)

Am I right in thinking that “If your motivation for asking the question is “I would like to participate in a discussion about X”, that should go to programmers.stackexchange.com?

You should probably point them to chat. That would be the place for those sort of discussions.

I must disagree with the statement “If you can authoritatively answer, it’s not a real question.” While I understand this was meant in the context of subjective questions, that sentence in itself is a bit too global in scope.

There have been several times where I have come across a tricky issue that I’ve been able to solve on my own, and later decided to post as a question on one of the StackExchanges. My foreknowledge (and, sometimes, self-posting) of the answer does not invalidate the value of the question. In fact, it actually increases the value of the question since it will have a definitive answer already posted, which has been tried and proven.

@Iszi

I think the key phrase was this:
“in a variant of ‘I’ll go first’”

If you just plain have the correct answer, that is different.

AaronSieb Jan 17 2011

@Jeff I think part of the point people are trying to make is less about what is/isn’t allowed, as it is that the wording is blatantly contradictory to a new user who doesn’t have the context of blog/meta discussions from the past couple years to sort things out.

i.e. The target audience of the FAQ…

Andomar Jan 17 2011

Questions like http://programmers.stackexchange.com/q/2846/3249 may not be productive, I think they’re lighthearted fun, and it’s a mistake to ban or close them.

> I like that this is now part of the FAQ, but we’ll no longer have a list of alternative sites?

This has not changed, it just got pushed down by a bit more text.

> It would be a shame if those kinds of questions were banned wholesale.

The guideline for poll questions isn’t that they are not allowed, it is that they must be constructive.

> I must disagree with the statement “If you can authoritatively answer, it’s not a real question.” While I understand this was meant in the context of subjective questions, that sentence in itself is a bit too global in scope.

I agree, and I think I will change that to something like…

“your answer is provided along with the question, in a variant of “I’ll go first”. If you are answering your own question and expecting even more answers to come along, it’s not a real question.”

> Questions like http://programmers.stackexchange.com/q/2846/3249 may not be productive, I think they’re lighthearted fun, and it’s a mistake to ban or close them.

See Robert’s response here

http://meta.programmers.stackexchange.com/questions/971/a-place-for-the-subjective-fun-questions/977#977

ROTFL!!!!

edited Oct 26 ’10 at 17:43

closed as not constructive by Walter♦ 10 hours ago

You guys rock.

There is a tiny recursion in point number three, when you use the word \constructive\ to describe how \constructive\ subjective questions should be.

That makes the foundation buggy, but whatever!