site title

Re-Launching Stack Exchange Data Explorer

12-13-10 by . 22 comments

Since we launched the Stack Exchange Data Explorer in June, we’ve been actively maintaining it and making small improvements to it. But there is one big change — as of today, the site has permanently moved from odata.stackexchange.com to

data.stackexchange.com

If you’re wondering what the heck this thing is, do read the introductory blog post, but in summary:

Stack Exchange Data Explorer is a web tool for sharing, querying, and analyzing the Creative Commons data from every website in the Stack Exchange network. It’s also useful as for learning SQL and sharing SQL queries as a ‘reference database’.

We are redirecting all old links to the new path, so everything should work as before. Why did we make this change?

Mostly because we decided to move off the Windows Azure platform. While Microsoft generously offered us free Azure hosting in exchange for odata support and a small “runs on Azure” logo in the footer, it ultimately did not offer the level of control that we needed. I’ll let Sam Saffron, the principal developer of SEDE, explain:

Teething issues

When we first started working with Azure, tooling was very rough. Tooling for Visual Studio and .NET 4.0 support only appeared a month after we started development. Remote access to Azure instances was only granted a few weeks ago together with the ability to run non-user processes.

There are still plenty of teething issues left, for example: on the SQL Azure side we can’t run cross database queries, add full-text indexes or backup our dbs using the BACKUP command. I am sure these will eventually be worked out. There’s also the 30 minute deploy cycle. Found a typo on the website? Correcting it is going to take 30 minutes, minimum.

Due to many of these teething issues, debugging problems with our Azure instances quickly became a nightmare. I spent days trying to work out why we were having uptime issues, which since have been mostly sorted.

It is important to note that these issues are by no means specific to Azure; similar teething issues affect other Platform-As-A-Service providers such as Google App Engine and Heroku. When you are using a PAAS you are giving up a lot of control to the service provider. The service provider chooses which applications you can run and imposes a series of restrictions.

The life cycle of a data dump

Whenever there is a new data dump, I would log on to my Rackspace instance, download the data dump, decompress it, rename a bunch of folders, run my database importer, and wait an hour for it to load. If there were any new sites, I would open up a SQL window and hack that into the DB. This process was time consuming and fairly tricky to automate. It could be automated, but it would require lots of work from our side.

Now that we migrated to servers we control, the process is almost simple — all we do is select a bunch of data from export views (containing public data) and insert them into a fresh DB. We are not stuck coordinating work between 4 machines across 3 different geographical locations.

Did I mention we are control freaks?

At Stack Overflow we take pride in our servers. We spend weeks tweaking our hardware and software to ensure we get the best performance and in turn you, the end user, get the most awesome experience.

It was disorienting moving to a platform where we had no idea what kind of hardware was running our app. Giving up control of basic tools and processes we use to tune our environment was extremely painful.

We thank Microsoft for letting us try out Azure; based on our experience, we’ve given them a bunch of hopefully constructive feedback. In the long run, we think a self-hosted solution will be much simpler for us to maintain, tune and automate.

There’s also few other bits (nibbles?) of data news:

  • We won’t be producing a data dump for the month of December 2010, but you can definitely expect one just after the new year. We apologize for the delay.
  • SEDE will continue to be updated monthly as a matter of policy to keep it in sync with the monthly data dumps.

Remember, SEDE is fully open source, so if you want to help us hack on it, please do!

code.google.com/p/stack-exchange-data-explorer

And as usual, if you have any bugs or feedback for us, leave it in in the [data-explorer] tag on meta, too.

22 Comments

grega_g Dec 13 2010

If I click OData on any page I get yellow screen of death. It helpfully suggests to change customErrors in web.config. I 2nd that. :D

@greg

I removed odata for the time being, we will add it back soon

Is there still a list of OData references. I loved the ability to use LINQPad to browse your data.

http://coderjournal.com/2010/06/using-linqpad-to-query-stack-overflow/

Thanks for taking the pain to give such a full explanation. I love this openness.

You can avoid the 30 mins deployment time by RDPing to the server. Course you folks never had that at your decision to move time.

Shame because knowing some startup folks who are on a self managed model (the way i always did things), and having done lots on Azure myself, i’d now *always* take the Azure route.

Still, when you’re doing as well as you folks and running a top product on an evolving platform you don’t have the time to wait.

Yes, thanks for the nice explanation.

I guess PAAS makes most sense if your bottleneck is the time to provision new instances in a server farm, and tuning of any given server doesn’t matter that much.

Azure might be a legitimate scale-out solution, but StackExchange uses an architecture that benefits more on a scale-up solution. That is, fewer servers, with greater optimization and tuning.

Thanks for sharing your experience.

To be fair, the Google App Engine link is a little bit outdated (october 2008).

My understanding is that SQL azure can be an odata provider.. Were u using this feature of SQL azure? If so – how will you be doing odata now?

@Nick, it will probably be back – was giving me YSODs, if you feel like submitting a patch that brings it back to life I would be more than happy to pull it in.

@Russ, we tried it but it was crippled in so many ways, we just ended up writing our own.

I think this is a great post, except for the part where you sweep every other provider along for the ride
. Have you used Heroku? I’ll agree that you’ll end up with some tradeoff, but nothing remotely in the same multiverse as what you guys seem to have run into with Azure.

@Karl

I agree that Heroku is much more polished and flexible than Azure, but at the end of the day you do not have access to the bare metal or even the OS. You give up a certain level of control. By-design. You are giving up more control then you are with say engine yard or amazon ec2.

I agree it is a bit unfair to put Heroku in the same ball park as Azure, Heroku is a much more polished product and probably the best PAAS example out there.

Nonetheless, there is no arguing that http://www.engineyard.com/products/appcloud/pricing is more flexible.

@Karl,

To expand on the Heroku limitations. Say I want to run full-text, I am stuck running solr or ferret. Eventually they will probably add sphinx support, but say I want some cutting edge feature in sphinx or solr, its very unlikely that will be there as it will at best be on the latest stable release.

Take file uploads, every connection to the rails app consumes a dyno, if I want to track huge downloads or add ACLs to them using x-sendfile, well no dice. I have no control over the Apache or nginx server running this whole kaboodle.

Take node.js … sure there is experimental support, embedding node in a Rails app takes some hairy nginx proxy rules, unlikely you will easily have access. Also unlikely you will be allowed to run bleeding edge stuff.

Sure for trivial and straight forward apps this works, stray from the path and you will hit lots of road blocks.

@Sam, why would you have the expectation of being able to run bleeding edge stuff on Heroku at all? That’s not the value proposition a managed platform offers. The whole point is that it makes deploying your application to a production environment easier by removing most of the fiddly configuration. If you are able to embrace the limitations then you get the easy ride.

If you need control down to the nth degree then of course you’re going to run your own servers, which is what this post is about.

Brian Lambert Dec 14 2010

I think it’s interesting that you say:

At Stack Overflow we take pride in our servers. We spend weeks tweaking our hardware and software to ensure we get the best performance and in turn you, the end user, get the most awesome experience.

You’re missing the whole point of the Cloud and PaaS. Tweaking servers is something hobbyists do. If you’re running a service at Internet scale, who has time to “Tweak the servers” every day?

I would love to hear more about the hardware that you moved to. How many servers / cores?

Trufa Dec 14 2010

This is fantastic! absolutely. Jeff said on the interview on hansel minutes that (we) developers love the option tab in our software, that he was sold the first time he tried that on chrome… well im sold now.

@John

Re: @Sam, why would you have the expectation of being able to run bleeding edge stuff on Heroku at all?

I don’t have any of those expectation, I was just illustrating ways in which Heroku is restricted, by-design. It’s a great fit for some projects, not a great fit for others

Craig Dec 15 2010

Brian, I tend to agree with you. When StackOverflow has 100 servers will they still be tweaking? They will have more sysadmins than developers!

“When StackOverflow has 100 servers will they still be tweaking? They will have more sysadmins than developers!” are you from the moon? Check out numbers first. 2 servers, 3 if they will expand to many services.

“You’re missing the whole point of the Cloud and PaaS. Tweaking servers is something hobbyists do. If you’re running a service at Internet scale, who has time to “Tweak the servers” every day?” BigTable is FAST, working with google or their services might be a good thing to think about.

“Did I mention we are control freaks?” That’s why and nothing else. For stackoverfloew’s scale they could save few thousand dollars on saving themselves from buying servers.

Visiting http://data.stackexchange.com/ tells me “Couldn’t find data.stackexchange.com The Q&A site data.stackexchange.com doesn’t seem to exist…yet.”

One reason for adopting a cloud/PAAS deployment approach is to have options in the event that your app goes viral. If StackOverflow experiences a spike in site-usage overnight, in exponential orders of magnitude , they would definitely rethink their anti-cloud policy .

peter Dec 29 2010

The link to Aral’s criticisms of app engine is way out of date. Many of the things he complains about are no longer issues. (of course they weren’t necessarily issues at all for some apps)

Steve Jan 10 2011

What’s up with the OData feed. When will it be back online?