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The Pee-Wee Herman Rule

11-29-10 by . 10 comments

I recently had a long discussion on gaming meta regarding “Help me remember this game” questions. I’ll spare you all the gory details; my general conclusion was this:

If we get an excellent user who asks a good, thoughtful [game] identification question and sticks around in our community to participate, then it’s worth allowing it in those rare cases as a high quality “getting to know you” fun question.

This reminded me of a conversation I once had on Server Fault Chat about mod rewrite questions. This is a true gray area in our network. It’s tricky, because any given URL rewriting question could legitimately be on topic for multiple sites, each with a different core audience:

I don’t think a black and white “all URL rewriting questions belong on {site}” ruling would be helpful in these gray areas. What matters most is the context of the question. You need to use your judgment to look at the bigger picture around the question: is this person a system administrator? a webmaster? a programmer? Even the ‘same’ URL rewriting question can have different solutions depending on which audience it’s being presented to.

That’s why I recommend considering these gray area questions in the context of the user. Does this user belong here on this site with us? Or is it the guy in the nerdy suit who just walked into the biker bar?

[Pee-Wee Herman walks into a noisy, rowdy, crowded biker bar. He puts a coin in the pay phone and begins dialing.]

Pee-Wee:
What? I’m sorry, operator. I can’t hear you. [turns to the bikers, yelling in exaggerated fashion] Shhh! I’m trying to use the phone!

[The bikers all grow quiet and circle around Pee-Wee at the pay phone. The lead biker hangs up the phone.]

Biker:
Did anybody tell you that this is the private club of the Satan’s Helpers?

Pee-Wee:
Nobody hipped me to that, dude!

Biker:
It’s off-limits!

Pee-Wee:
Oh. Well, my mistake. Ha ha! Guess I’ll be on my way, then! Ha ha!

[Pee-Wee tries to innocently exit, pushing his way gently outward against the tightly grouped circle of bikers surrounding him.]

Pee-Wee:
Excuse me! Excuse me. Ha ha! Excuse me! Excuse me.

(There’s no way I can do this brilliant scene justice in text, so you should watch the clip on YouTube. This is of course from the timeless movie Pee-Wee’s Big Adventure.)

Anyway, my point is this: when you have to make judgment calls about questions in the gray area of mildly off-topic — apply the Pee-Wee Herman Rule!

  1. If you have reason to believe, based on the context, quality, and content of the question, that this user could potentially be a positive contributor to your community — I’d be inclined to let their question stay.
  2. If you have reason to believe, based on the context, quality, and content of the question, that this user would not be a positive contributor to your community — I’d be inclined to close the question, or migrate it somewhere else where they’d fit in better.

This is not meant to be an exclusionary rule. It’s more of a general measurement of how committed new users are to at least trying to fit in to the community they just walked in to. As Pee-Wee proved, being the nerdy guy in the biker bar can work — so long as you’re willing to dance the Tequila song with us.

Filed under community, design, reference

10 Comments

Pablo Nov 29 2010

Should this two points be taken into account for StackOverflow (and other sites too) ?

I have seem a few questions where it’s obvious the user is not going to be a positive contributor of the community.

I guess it went without saying that the above really only applies to GTKY questions and GTKY questions alone? :)

Daniel Lew Nov 29 2010

I find this amusing because just the other day I was telling a fellow SO user that one reason I enjoy the community of gaming.stackexchange.com was due to the “identify this game” questions. In fact, I was probably mentioning this right as you were trying to shut it down, as I don’t pay attention to the meta exchanges.

To me, shutting down “identify this game” questions is tantamount to the annoyance I get from Wikipedia deletionists – it’s taking up barely any space and it’s beneficial to someone, so why do you have to view it negatively?

Am I the only one who noticed two uses of “gray area” and one of “grey area”?

> To me, shutting down “identify this game” questions is tantamount to the annoyance I get from Wikipedia deletionists – it’s taking up barely any space and it’s beneficial to someone, so why do you have to view it negatively?

Man isn’t this a good point.

What is with those Wikipedia guys anyway? What does it hurt if I add myself to Wikipedia? Why is notable such a big deal over there? Its like they’re trying to establish a reputable Encyclopedia instead of trying to cover everything….

The problem with the logic “it’s taking up barely any space” is that I can apply it to any question no matter how bad.

This argument of Mac vs Windows is bad, but it’s taking up barely any space…

Non omnes possumus omnia, my Latin teacher was always quick to remind me: You can’t do everything. What she was trying to say was: we have limited time and resources and if we spread them too thin we’ll fail at everything.

Its very easy to look at crowd sourcing and say: *I have unlimited time and resource* and completely ignore the consequence of trying to access them. If we let in questions which are Bad™, then we risk eroding our community over time. Even in small numbers these questions lead to erosion and quickly snow ball. If you want a good example of snow balling, look at Game-Rec on gaming.se: its a mess.

So there is a lot of value in nipping this in the bud, and there is a good reason I don’t have an entry in Wikipedia (though I get a user page). People need to lay off the Wikipedia moderators a little. Sure their approach can feel Draconian, but sometimes when you’re herding cats you have to be a little strict: that’s the price we pay for drawing on every Tom, Dick and Harry on the [Internet](www.4chan.org).

Er, so the new position on whether or not to close these questions is whether or not you like the user?

@Pablo “Should this two points be taken into account for StackOverflow (and other sites too) ?”

If the question is EGREGIOUSLY off-topic, then it should be closed because it is off topic! But when the question is only kinda/sorta/maybe off-topic then you should factor in “will the presence of this user on our site make my community better or worse?”

@BlueRaja where did I say anything about liking or not liking users? What I said was:

“based on the context, quality, and content of the question, could this user potentially be a positive contributor to your community?

Yes or no?

It’s about the user only insofar as they are able to produce a *quality* gray area question.

melicerte Dec 3 2010

Rule number 3 of the Pee-Wee Herman Rule:
You shall not forget the biker question:

Did anybody tell you that this is the private club of the Satan’s Helpers?

Cheers,

Jane Dec 3 2010

Funny, because that clip demonstrates exactly how I feel as a female trying to join a community of mostly male programmers. I understand what you’re getting at, but I kind of wish that you had been more careful to state what it means to “belong.” There are already a lot of people who feel that they don’t belong in programming communities when there is no good reason why they shouldn’t.

Does a Muslim woman from Indonesia with a passion for Scala “belong”? I imagine that you, Jeff, would say yes. But when you write a post about how to treat people who don’t belong, you need to bear in mind that many programmers would say no.

@Jane I don’t know how we would know any of that information.

Mostly I am referring to things like

- can this person form complete sentences, with punctuation and capital letters more or less in the correct places?
- can this person express a coherent thought in writing?
- does this person appear to be angry at the audience?

All of which can be inferred from the *content* of the question itself, and has little to nothing to do with the identity of that person.