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Stack Overflow: Where We Hate Fun

01-04-10 by . 55 comments

I noticed that the Stack Overflow question Strangest language feature has been closed and reopened several times now. The text of the question is brief:

What is in your opinion the most surprising, weird, strange or really “WTF” language feature you have encountered?

I agree this is not exactly an ideal question for Stack Overflow, per the FAQ:

Avoid asking questions that are subjective, argumentative, or require extended discussion. This is not a discussion board, this is a place for questions that can be answered!

I think some members of the community have gotten the idea that Stack Overflow is strictly business — unless your question fits our rules exactly to a T, it is absolutely disallowed. That, here on Stack Overflow, we hate “fun”.

This is not entirely true.

In my mind, there are three broad guidelines that determine whether a question is appropriate for Stack Overflow:

  1. Does this question match the criteria provided in the Stack Overflow FAQ?
  2. Is this question accepted by the community, as reflected in upvotes, favorites, views, and answers?
  3. Does this question teach me anything that could make me better at my job? Can I learn something from it?

How does the “fun” question Strangest language feature fare?

  1. Does this question match the criteria provided in the Stack Overflow FAQ?
    Not really, no.

  2. Is this question accepted by the community, as reflected in upvotes, views, favorites, and answers?
    Yes. Lots of upvotes, views, favorites, and many detailed answers.

  3. Does this question teach me anything that could make me better at my job? Can I learn something from it?
    Yes. These odd language corner cases bite programmers all the time, and the more programmers that are aware of them, the better.

As Meat Loaf once said, two out of three ain’t bad. It’s guideline #3 that ends up being the pivotal decision in most borderline cases.

I should clarify that we absolutely do not want the site overrun with “fun” questions. There’s no way we’re sacrificing our core Q&A mission to turn into a brainless LOL-fest like Reddit or Digg. But, there is a certain balance we’re trying to achieve. A world without fun is like a world without waffles and ponies. And what kind of monster would want that?

I know that we’re all programmers, so we love thinking of the world in absolute, binary terms — either fun questions must never be allowed, or fun questions must always be allowed. Well, I hate to be the one to break this to you, but the world is more … floating point. We will sometimes allow fun questions that meet the three broad guidelines I outlined above, but even then, only a limited amount.

On Stack Overflow, contrary to popular opinion, we don’t hate fun. But only a certain amount of fun will be tolerated, and always with steely, businesslike frowns. :)

Filed under background, community, design

55 Comments

I actually found that exact question to be extremely valuable in the professional context. It made me aware of a number of pitfalls and sillies in a bunch of languages and that, in turn, has improved my coding style just a bit.

Anyone who thinks serious precludes laughter needs to learn to live a little bit more than they are now….

The problem is that people feel entitled to fair treatment and when you give them some precedence to compare their situation to they might get upset when they perceive that they aren’t being treated fairly for their ‘fun’ question. That’s more their problem then yours but it’s the sort of problems gray areas cause. I agree with your decision though.

a_m0d Jan 4 2010

Glad to see that you’re laying down some more guidelines for this – now hopefully people follow them!

captcha: bugatti takes

“Zero fun, sir!” – Remember The Titans

Pablo Fernandez Jan 4 2010

Wouldn’t it be nice to enforce this rules somehow? Perhaps stating that a question with N+ upvotes or N+ favourites can’t be closed?

I certainly do not love binary terms but rules / guidelines :D

Nick Jan 4 2010

Agreed. There’s nothing worse than being part of an online community that can’t have a good laugh once in a while when its appropriate.

Jonathan Keith Jan 4 2010

Personally, I would be fine with never seeing another waffle or pony.

Hum. I voted to close it as Subjective & Argumentative yesterday, because it looked like nothing more than an open invitation to whine about language features that you don’t care for. “weird”, “strange”, “WTF” == negativity. I love a good language flamewar as much as the next guy, but… that’s what discussion forums are for.

Contrast this with the ever-popular “Hidden features of…” questions that also invite users to share obscure features but without the negative, judgmental criteria.

Is it possible to learn from a question like this? Sure. I’ve learned stuff from The Daily WTF too. And, on occasion, from rubbernecking at car wrecks.

Perhaps SO could just add a “…or demonstrates behavior that should not be repeated…” criteria to the FAQ…

I’m in favor of questions like “Strangest language feature”, because as you mentioned, there is useful content there, and it is INTERESTING.

As far as things that are just lists of jokes or comics, I’d prefer they stayed off of SO.

> because it looked like

I agree it looked like a bad question … but the empirical data — namely votes, views, favorites, useful and interesting answers — proved that it was not.

Should things that look like bad questions be closed early on? Absolutely.

Should things that looked like bad questions, but somehow magically became useful questions within 2 days, be closed? Definitely not.

Survival of the fittest, I say.

I like the suggestion (somewhere on Meta) that users should be able to cast re-open votes before the question gets closed. So if I see that the current status is “Close (3)”, I can knock that down to “Close (2)”. The way it works currently, every slightly contentious question will get closed, at least temporarily, because the system only listens to one side at a time.

Of course, you could make an argument for just using the normal votes, and only close questions that end up with a negative score (i.e. any question that is older than 5 minutes and has a score of -5 or lower gets auto-closed). This would probably be a more inclusionist approach than the current mechanism because at present it seems that most of the questions that get closed have positive scores. Then again, that could be because people aren’t down-voting because voting to close costs nothing and is more effective.

Stack Overflow lulz policy is similar to Soup Nazi’s bread policy

> I agree it looked like a bad question … but the
> empirical data — namely votes, views, favorites,
> useful and interesting answers — proved that it was
> not.

Perhaps the system should prevent closure (except by diamond moderators) of questions that have achieved “worthiness” according to the data?

The problem isn’t the amusing “fun” questions (because most of them aren’t). The problem is the hundreds of other poor questions where closing them elicits responses of “Why did you close my question when question X isn’t closed?”

An inconsistently applied standard is going to cause problems.

It’s further exacerbated by some people posting these questions to essentially farm badges.

Please give us more “fun” guidelines to follow.

> Survival of the fittest, I say.

I’m *really* having trouble reconciling this with your “no joke questions” policy. How many up-votes, favorites, interesting answers… did “programming at sea” collect? And how many more would it have needed to live…?

> How many up-votes, favorites, interesting answers… did “programming at sea” collect?

Oh, you wanted a pedant-off? Why didn’t you just say so? :)

Many differences:

- it was not posted in good faith (predicated on a trick/joke/lie)
- it does not teach the average programmer anything useful about their craft
- only achieved pseudo-popularity when it was mentioned on the podcast (Hawthorne effect)

> an inconsistently applied standard is going to cause problems

When it comes to people and writing, the idea that there can be a perfect, consistently applied standard — that’s what is going to cause the most problems in the long run.

> Stack Overflow lulz policy is similar to Soup Nazi’s bread policy.

What, just because our standards are inconsistent, irrational and arbitrarily applied? That is so unfair.

wcoenen Jan 4 2010

I voted to close and I stand by my actions. The question is overly broad, subjective, and has many not-quite-duplicates. I’m thinking about questions with keywords like “hidden features”, “surprising”, “weirdest”, etcetera. Pointing to the empirical data won’t change my mind about this. That would be like watching TV soap operas just because they have high ratings.

My opinion doesn’t really matter though. The core of the problem is that too many stackoverflow users have near-admin powers, causing a jojo effect when there is disagreement.

If fixing that means that my humble reputation score no longer enables the casting of close votes, so be it.

wcoenen, you should always vote the way you feel is correct, and nothing here contradicts that. We support both inclusionists and deletionists.

However, a certain amount of repetition / duplication is helpful to have in the system.

http://www.codinghorror.com/blog/archives/000549.html

Part of this is the tension we absorbed in the design — we support both wiki (there can be ONLY ONE article on Asphalt!) and blog (there can be MILLIONS of articles on Asphalt!) aspects.

Aakash Mehendale Jan 4 2010

>>
Should things that look like bad questions be closed early on? Absolutely.

Should things that looked like bad questions, but somehow magically became useful questions within 2 days, be closed? Definitely not.

Survival of the fittest, I say.
>>

Some of these things, as Sesame Street put it, don’t look the same as each other.

>>
When it comes to people and writing, the idea that there can be a perfect, consistently applied standard — that’s what is going to cause the most problems in the long run.
>>

If the *actual* law is that ‘those with the highest rep / mod-ness / ownership get to dictate THE TRUTH’ then just say so. What rubs people up the wrong way is *pretending* to be mob-ruled, um, I mean, democratic, then *acting* oligarchic or autocratic in the face of the mob.

Wait a minute, was not that the reason why meta was created in first place? To hold all the “funny” questions? OMG! all this time I’ve been posting jokes on meta ( that explain why they were closed there too )

While the question is very interesting, it really belongs to.. reddit. I mean, is totally subjective, and it is not a real question ( that is with a real acceptable answer )

Look the first two answers are actually answers for two different questions, the first one could be:

Why is it allowed to use 10[a] in C?

The second one could be:

Why ’5′+3 gives 53 but ’5′ – 2 returns 2?

And so on.

We have learned not to ask subjective questions in the past the hard way ( having the community closing our q ) and we teach the community that’s not welcome ( by closing their subjective questions ) I don’t think it’s fair that this particular questions gets blessed with an entry on blog.stackoverflow.com only because Jeff subjectively thought it is useful ( well he created the site and all but… well , how do I … ehem.. — oopps OMG how to I end this now — ) Ok anyway

ehem …

Probably a diamond mark “I like this and don’t want you to close it” power tool would solve this situation ( like the locked tool?) .

Otherwise the way the system is implemented, this may go into a yoyo loop until we all “stackoverflow” …. ( or we run out of voters )

Increasing by 2 the amount of closers/openers may help also ( 5, 10, 20, 40, etc. )

Jeff no hard feelings ok?

A Group Is Its Own Worst Enemy

Now, there’s a large body of literature saying “We built this software, a group came and used it, and they began to exhibit behaviors that surprised us enormously, so we’ve gone and documented these behaviors.” Over and over and over again this pattern comes up. (I hear Stewart [Brand, of the WELL] laughing.) The WELL is one of those places where this pattern came up over and over again.

Jeff, I think you are missing some important points. I won’t argue against the validity of the question on Stack Overflow. What I want to point out is that:

1. We *already have* a bunch of similar questions.
2. It’s not about closing a single question. When such a question is left open, others will cite them and will say, “Hey, can’t you see that question? Why that’s valid and mine is not.” In fact this very question does exactly this by referring to the “hidden language future”.

I also understand that you personally have to be a populist and take actions that will disappoint minimal number of people and thus, it’s not good for your public persona to enforce the strict rules when you see a bunch of upvotes.

One interesting fact about that question is one of the comments that says the ratio of serious questions/fun questions is very healthy at SO and thus, we should be less strict about fun questions. I believe the fact that the guy thinks it’s healthy right now is a direct consequence of strictly shooting down invalid questions by community members that care about SO as soon as possible so that they can attract that amount of votes and become hard-to-close.

Unfortunately, this blog entry, which is written with a short-sighted and populistic view is a bad one for Stack Overflow. I’m already imagining bad questions that will refer to it and say “fun is allowed, don’t be so strict”. Personally, I won’t act as strictly when I see bad questions anymore since this blog post is essentially an “official policy”.

I hope Stack Overflow doesn’t become Yahoo! Answers.

I’m in favor of the idea that you can vote to re-open if there’s a vote to close rather than increasing the number of votes it takes to close a question. This seems like a very obvious and (most likely) simple solution to apply.

During one of the close cycles, I voted to close as a duplicate of http://stackoverflow.com/questions/146329/what-is-the-worst-gotcha-youve-experienced and mentioned that in a comment, but unfortunately other close votes outnumbered the duplicate vote.

Many of the answers to these two questions are the same (and indeed, posted by the same people).

something Jan 4 2010

Sounds to me like there should be a way to mark such a “fun” question as different then open and shut questions.
Such questions probably shouldn’t generate any reputation for those involved.

> A Group Is Its Own Worst Enemy

I think Clay and I might have mentioned this when we keynoted together at EclipseCon:

http://www.codinghorror.com/blog/archives/001245.html

You can search Coding Horror for earlier Shirky references, if you’re bored. :)

> Many of the answers to these two questions are the same
> We *already have* a bunch of similar questions.

Some duplication is desirable, as covered before…

http://blog.stackoverflow.com/2009/04/handling-duplicate-questions/

> When such a question is left open, others will cite them and will
> say, “Hey, can’t you see that question? Why that’s valid and mine is not.”

“Congratulations…you’ve found an inconsistency in the world. If only there were some way for you to reconcile it.”

http://blog.stackoverflow.com/2009/04/the-stack-overflow-question-lifecycle/

Hi Jeff.

The reason for writing a short concise reply was because I enjoy using stack overflow and have been bitten by the FUN bug a couple of times. Per say, I’m not going to be pro or con anything you say because it don’t know the context or your situation you’re writing it in.

I will say that even though the rules may seem harsh, and people are against them and suggesting all different solutions. I would say, even if a person doesn’t like it, it sets boundaries and responsibility on users who would otherwise just start derailing the site.

Keep up the great work, love your site.

The problem here is mixed messages.

SO is saying “fun questions aren’t allowed (except when they are)”. Everyone sees their own “fun” questions as making the grade and inevitably ask “why close mine and not X?” when it (most of the time) gets closed.

Badge farming exacerbates the problem.

As Greg pointed out, it’s many of the same people posting these questions, answering these questions and indeed posting the same answers on very similar sounding questions.

Duplicates are useful for programming questions and it is my opinion that these are too eagerly deleted but do we really need duplicates of “fun” questions so they’re allegedly easier to find? Really?

Fact is, reddit works far better for this kind of topic. Topics get voted down and barely seen or they get voted up and seen by quite a few people. With sufficient upvoting they’ll get “promoted” to prominence on http://www.reddit.com (from subreddits).

This works incredibly well for subjective/off-topic questions. And frankly this is where I think “fun” questions belong. The programming cartoon question (locked) has duplicates of the same cartoon because (surprise surprise) no one bothers to read the whole thread.

Basically this kind of question appeals to the kind of poster who likes the sound of his or her own voice and isn’t much interested in reading anything anyone else has written.

Is this really what we want to encourage?

> The programming cartoon question (locked) has duplicates of the same cartoon because (surprise surprise) no one bothers to read the whole thread

Apples and oranges.

What can one learn from reading a cartoon? Not much.

What can one learn from reading source code another developer posted to illustrate an edge condition in a language? Quite a bit!

“This is like the boat programming question!”

No, it isn’t. (see my earlier responses)

“This is like the programming cartoon question!”

No, it isn’t. (see above)

If this is about simple jealousy over other people getting badges “they don’t deserve”, then why pussyfoot around? Why not just say that?

Lunatik Jan 4 2010

“The world is not binary. It’s more…floating point.”

Nice t-shirt slogan there!

You sir, get +1 for the Meat Loaf reference, and a further +1 for using a space in his name. :)

brann Jan 4 2010

I read that question specifically because I thought it might teach me a few things, which it did.

That being said, I agree most of fun questions seems to be asked not because the OP has got a question (or thinks he could learn from the answers) but rather because he’s after fame/badges/rep/whatever

What about changing a bit the system so that the questions tagged “subjective” or “fun” does not bring any badges, nor rep ? I’m not advocating accepting EVERY fun question provided it has the fun tag ; I’m just proposing accepting only the questions we accept right now (using the guidelines provided in this post), and ONLY if they are tagged appropriately.

This would (hopefully) reduce the badge farming issue (if it exists), and help people avoid that “noise” if that’s the way they see “subjective” questions.

Michel Jan 5 2010

Jeff, that question is not about stupid funny things like programming cartoons or programming jokes … look at the answers, they look funny ? I don’t think so …

many of them are nice features of programming languages like C , Python , PHP, etc that could be helpful for other programmers and let them think about features of languages.

“Does this question match the criteria provided in the Stack Overflow FAQ?”
maybe …. “this is a place for questions that can be answered!” –> MAYBE this question have a “Best Answer”! Best feature … maybe that’s a real question. but if questioner just want programmers “opinion” ( “What is in your opinion the most ….”), that’s not a real question! that’s a discussion …

but anyway, non-programmers couldn’t understand any of those answers and they are not funny. we can’t retag that question as funny I think …

Generally you have questions that have one best answer. In this case you have a question with possibly many great answers. Then you have a page that will load more slowly.

Like Michael I don’t think this question is in the same category as programming cartoons or programming jokes questions.

Besides “a certain amount of fun is OK”,
what I read from Jeff’s post is that a question being useful is more important than following every letter of the FAQ. I certainly support that.

There was a similar discussion before about one of my own questions:
http://stackoverflow.com/questions/961942/what-is-the-worst-programming-language-you-ever-worked-with

I think this was very similar: maybe against the FAQ, but useful anyway.

Curious to know how many more times you need to discuss this topic. Between the blog and the podcast its surely over two dozen times it has been mentioned.

Jeff,

Programming cartoons and strange language features are indeed two different types of questions. Dealing specifically with the latter:

There are questions on SO that aren’t so black and white as being able to pick a definite answer. A prime example is:

http://stackoverflow.com/questions/9033/hidden-features-of-c

Even without a definite answer it has value to any aspiring or even experienced C# developer.

Strange language features is much broader and it doesn’t have the same value. It’s just entertainment for a limited few by an even more limited few. There are only so many times I need to be told “10[a] and a[10] are equivalent in C” (by the same people!).

Yes it’s a sliding scale and yes it’s a subjective standard.

For the love of Pete, people!

1) It is programming related
2) It is interesting to a LARGE number of people (look at upvotes and favorites)
3) It’s not even a “fun” question!
4) Check out the About section again… see that left circle? For all of you whining about how it’s like Reddit, well, it is by design! Stop trying to close things that other people are obviously interested in and just let it be. If you don’t like it, vote it down and stop participating.

Goodness… you people are crazy!

> Between the blog and the podcast its surely over two dozen times it has been mentioned.

Yes, definitely mentioned on the podcast several times.. but I don’t think we had an single blog post on this topic, stating our official position on it yet. Now we do!

Also, you’ll be happy to know that I avoided mentioning this topic on this week’s podcast, precisely because we had covered it so many times in audio.

“I agree it looked like a bad question … but the empirical data — namely votes, views, favorites, useful and interesting answers — proved that it was not.”

The problem is that these empirical measures are only available if a question is left open long enough to accrue the data. There are a number of mods that I would subjectively classify as “zealots” who seem trigger happy on shutting down questions that even have a whiff of not being suitable. I know it’s a difficult balance, but this measure is very hard to achieve if no opportunity for metric collection is provided.

Jeff Davis Jan 6 2010

You can’t please everyone.

“If this is about simple jealousy over other people getting badges “they don’t deserve”, then why pussyfoot around? Why not just say that?”

I agree, that’s the real issue. I’ve experienced it over and over again with some of higher reputation users on Stackoverflow.

> this measure is very hard to achieve if no opportunity for metric collection is provided.

Correct — which is why the question surviving at all, much less long enough to get useful answers, was quite an accomplishment in its own right.

Gab Royer Jan 8 2010

Coming late to the party but I would like to say that what surprises me the most is how much energy is put on such a meta-matter. But what surprises me even more is that I am surprised that people get so anal about things like this.

It’s the Internet after all.

mattias Jan 8 2010

There goal of restricting fun questions is not about the questions themselves, it is about keeping Stackoverflow on topic.

Therefore it makes more sense to come up with rules such as “there may be at most 5% fun questions” or “there may be one fun question per week”, not in terms of votes or popularity.

And as a result, the decision which questions to keep open must be subjective if many fun questions are submitted – some of these must be closed even if similar ones have been allowed in the past.

I’d just like to add another voice to the idea of being able to vote against Close votes while the question is still open. It’s silly the way that questions ping-pong between open and closed.

Sometimes I’ll come across a question that has a couple of completely illogical close votes – like the question on embedded systems programming with a “belongs on ServerFault” close vote! – and all I can do is post a comment trying to patiently explain why the close votes are unjustified, and hope that others see it before they reflexively jump on the close bandwagon.

JYelton Jul 14 2010

Jeff, this answer helps a lot, perhaps a link to it (or a distilled version of) from the FAQ would be helpful!

The Q&A core mission is functional, and is the sole reason I became an active participant. However the “discussion” questions (fun or not) that are on-topic, are extremely useful and part of the reason that I remember to come back.

if (Math.random() < 0.5)
{
allowFun();
}

;)

Now the question has been fully deleted. I think Stack Overflow really does hate fun…

funlover Jul 25 2012

So.. you DO hate fun

Ryan Aug 4 2012

Your moderators ask and answer questions that conflict with the rules above, yet are “allowed” under yor grey rules, above.

SE admins recently wrote a post about being more ‘friendly’ to new joiners.

I posted to “programmers” – a site I READ was a more general site for CAREER DEVELOPMENT. With a question about CAREER DEVELOPMENT which was up voted, answered and generally very well received ( in fact the most enthusiastically received question I have asked and I’ve been a respected, active member of SE for three years)

And the fun police closed it.

How short sighted. Really disappointing. On to somewhere else.

There’s nothing wrong with having fun. But it doesn’t belong on Stack Overflow. Once it meets criteria #1, it shouldn’t be there. What it comes down to is discussion questions are off-topic, unless they are highly upvoted or “teach me something”, then it’s OK. Meh.

This creates an arbitrary feel to the site that is becoming a huge turn off. I come to Stack Overflow to ask and answer questions, and I expect the rules to be applied uniformly. When I see the rules only applied occasionally, the broken windows theory is in full effect. That’s when the site starts becoming insular.

Kumar Harsh Aug 12 2012

Thanks a lot for showing clearly SO’s standing on the content that gets posted here. Totally agree with you guys.