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High Scalability Blog on Stack Overflow

07-17-09 by . 16 comments

It was quite an honor to see that the High Scalability Blog posted an entry on Stack Overflow!

We referred to the HSB, and its exhaustively detailed information about how other websites handle scaling, many times during the course of Stack Overflow development. And I’ve cited it myself when researching what we think is the largest public same-stack (Microsoft) website on the internet, Plenty of Fish. It’s an excellent resource.

I don’t know if Stack Overflow has that much traffic relative to many of the other truly giant public websites profiled on the HSB. You can see our public Stack Overflow traffic stats at Quantcast if you’re curious. Still, it’s great to be able to give back to the community and help document our own process of scaling our little corner of the web.

That said, I agree with the overall conclusion that Todd Hoff reaches:

If you need to Google scale then you really have no choice but to go the NoSQL direction. But Stack Overflow is not Google and neither are most sites. When thinking about your design options keep Stack Overflow in mind. In this era of multi-core, large RAM machines and advances in parallel programming techniques, scale up is still a viable strategy and shouldn’t be tossed aside just because it’s not cool anymore. Maybe someday we’ll have the best of both worlds, but for now there’s a big painful choice to be made and that choice decides your fate.

Scaling up is definitely a viable solution, as both Plenty of Fish and we can attest.

Like all of Todd’s pieces, it is exhaustively researched and documented, and well worth your time to read. I was a little stunned how thorough it was, actually — I doubt anyone outside our core development team has thought about our design and scaling this much!

Filed under background, server

16 Comments

+1 for scaling up (even on stack without licensing).

Andy McKenna Jul 17 2009

I’ve only worked on small to medium sites. The thought of needing to denormalize scares me.

From posts on this blog an the podcasts it seems that most of the speedups have been from relatively small tweaks to do with caching, how images and CSS are served an a few SQL refactorisations – all things that would apply equally to a LAMP implementation. I don’t think there is any MS stack performance advantage that makes SO possible.

> I don’t think there is any MS stack performance advantage that makes SO possible.

I disagree, based on my experience with PHP (Interpreted) versus C# (compiled) performance. I understand Ruby is even slower than PHP..

I’d also argue that SQL Server 2008 offers far more performance than MySQL (on a single box), and full-text indexing that actually works.

That said, obviously caching is hugely important .. and it is nigh impossible to do an apples to apples comparison.

chakrit Jul 18 2009

Ah.. the holy wars… I rule because I never used the other one. : – )

“I disagree, based on my experience with PHP (Interpreted) versus C# (compiled) performance. I understand Ruby is even slower than PHP..”

You’ve up and started a Holy War Jeff. I’ve read a lot of comparisons, and here’s my $0.02:

0. Didn’t you say that interpreted languages are so slow that it doesn’t even matter? http://www.codinghorror.com/blog/archives/000838.html
1. Comparing Ruby + Rails to straight PHP makes no sense but is what most people do, they usually don’t compare similarly complex queries across Lang + MVC Framework.
2. In raw language comparisons it depends on what you’re measuring, sometimes PHP comes ahead, sometimes ruby.
3. It’s hard not to build a Rails app that won’t scale horizontally as far as actual rails processes go. The DB won’t scale of course, but that’s not a lang issue.
4. With Rails metal, a mechanism to bypass the entire stack and code straight ruby for extremely high performance pages, you can get performance similar to a plain php script.
5. Memcached and HTTP caching make a lot of performance problems go away so quickly.

JulianR Jul 18 2009

I was wondering how you handled the performance of LINQ-to-SQL. Do you call stored procedures for everything, or do you still have queries in your code? If so, are they all compiled queries?

Andy McKenna Jul 19 2009

@JulianR, Jeff said in the last podcast that there are no stored procedures used on SO.

>> I don’t think there is any MS stack performance advantage that makes SO possible.
> I disagree, based on my experience with PHP (Interpreted) versus C# (compiled) performance. I understand Ruby is even slower than PHP..

PHP and Ruby aren’t your only alternatives to an MS stack. Others are faster. :)

> I’ve only worked on small to medium sites. The thought of needing to denormalize scares me.

The nice thing about modern databases is that “denormalization” is often a semi-automated process. Instead of changing your code to duplicate data, you make new materialized views (db terminology varies) that improve performance, without so much extra code to maintain redundant data. It isn’t nearly as scary as it used to be, imo.

Although, this is one area where commercial stacks help. I don’t know of any FOSS dbs with solid materialized view support at the moment.

lhahne Jul 20 2009

It would be nice to see some performance comparisons on asp.net mvc on .Net and Mono.

Thanks for the link. I don’t know if the kinds of projects I work on will ever need me to use that kind of knowledge, but I learned tons from it.

Jared Jul 20 2009

I was very impressed with the article

David Jul 20 2009

@lhahne – I’d also like to see those comparisons!

>>C#/.Net is at least as good as Java/JVM. ASP .NET has always been a confusing mess to me.

Is this the author’s words or Stackoverflow?

wow, spammers are getting really clever ^^