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New Stack Overflow Server Glamour Shots

01-11-09 by . 36 comments

In Server Hosting — Rent vs. Buy? I solicited opinions on whether it made more sense to continue renting our Stack Overflow servers, or to buy them. Thanks for everyone’s feedback on that!

Now the die is cast — check out these sexy glamour shots of the two (soon to be three) new Stack Overflow servers:

stackoverflow-lenovo-servers-overview

Feast your eyes on that hot, sweet server hardware!

We plan to have three servers for now, but we did secure a half rack at our hosting provider for future expansion, as necessary. Here’s what we’ll be shipping to them initially:

The 1U web tier servers are modest:

lenovo-rs110-overview

1 Lenovo ThinkServer RS110 barebones $630
4 2 GB RAM 240-pin DDR2 800 $70
2 eBay drive brackets $50
2 500 GB datacenter hard drives, mirrored $160
1 Intel Xeon X3360 2.83 GHz quad-core CPU $350

Grand total of $1,260. Plus another 10 percent for tax, shipping, and so forth.

The 2U database tier server is considerably beefier:

lenovo-rd120-overview

lenovo-rd120-drive-bays

1 Lenovo ThinkServer RD120 barebones $1,490
12 2 GB RAM 240-pin DDR2 667 FB-DIMM $600
6 eBay drive brackets $150
6 500 GB datacenter hard drives, RAID 10 $480
2 Intel Xeon E5420 2.5 GHz quad-core CPU $700
1 aftermarket IBM heatsink for 2nd proc $90
1 aftermarket IBM VRM for 2nd proc $120

Grand total of $3,630. Plus another 10 percent for tax, shipping, and so forth.

I can sell the low-end Xeons and dinky amounts of (incorrectly sized) memory that I pulled out and replaced in every server, to defray the costs a tiny bit.

So, in a nutshell, for around $6,000 we’ll end up with the following:

Web Tier Database Tier
two servers one server
4 cores, 2.83 Ghz, 12 MB L2 cache 8 cores, 2.5 Ghz, 24 MB L2 cache
8 GB RAM 24 GB RAM
500 GB RAID 1 mirror array
(hot-fail, cold-swap)
500 GB RAID 10 array
(hot-swap, up to 2 drives at once)
dual redundant power supplies

(I am taking to heart the comment advice I got in my previous blog entry; we’ll be shipping multiple spare hard drives down to the hosting provider, and I added that second 1U server just as a backup in case anything weird happens. We technically didn’t need two web tier servers, yet.)

Sure, $6,000 sounds like a lot. But if you take a typical $800 per month hosting bill for renting dedicated servers this powerful, and then cut it in half because you’re no longer paying every month for servers — we save $4,800 per year, every single year! This one-time investment in server hardware pays for itself in a year and a half.

Compared to our current two identical dedicated servers, which aren’t exactly chopped liver, this gives us:

  • 1.5x the overall speed (faster CPUs, faster memory bus, more L2 cache)
  • 2x the memory on web; 8x the memory on database
  • larger and faster storage with bigger drives and RAID 10 option

What this means to you is a faster Stack Overflow! As far as I’m concerned performance is a core feature; we can never be fast enough, and I’m constantly on the lookout for ways to make pages load faster.

Having these new servers in place (hopefully sometime in early-ish February) also enables us to expand, which I’ll be blogging about in more detail tomorrow.

Filed under server

36 Comments

Looks fun, when I had my computer repair shop, a few years ago now, I loved spending entire weeks building workstations and servers.

Looks awesome, how long do you anticipate your downtime when switching over? if you are switching the DNS entries don’t forget to scale back your TTL times prior to the cut over so it propagates faster once you make the switch.

Congrats, I hope they work out for you. Given you’ve gone the non-HCL route for RAM and drives I would do a TON of testing before shipping them off.

Do the systems have remote-access cards?

matías nino Jan 12 2009

Looks absolutely delish! It’s so nice to actually see some of the server side of the hardware enthusiast world. Can’t wait to heard about how these babies perform!

Daryl Jan 12 2009

OK, but what about software costs? SQL Server gets real pricey…

http://www.microsoft.com/BizSpark/

“BizSpark is uniquely designed to accelerate your success by providing fast, affordable access to current, full-featured Microsoft tools and technologies, plus production licensing for hosted solutions.”

Just out of curiosity. How much did you need to spend on software licenses on top of all the server hardware?

$300 for BizSpark. See above.

Also, how much are you paying for the co-location and how many U’s do you get for that?

David Sykes Jan 13 2009

How long will the servers last before they are out of date? Hopefully more than two years, or you’ll struggle to make the money back.

Then again, add in the fun factor and it’s a no brainer

ServerNut Jan 13 2009

You mentioned that the drives on the web server were mirrored and the db server was raid 10 but I don’t see the cost for the raid adapter itemized. Did you leave that out?

Thanks for sharing – very interesting.

Did software licensing represent a big part of the cost or influence the hardware decisions (like, number of CPUs)?

I thought I remember reading that you’re running on Windows and SQL Server. Understanding the software costs would also be interesting.

> I don’t see the cost for the raid adapter itemized

included in both servers as part of the base config.

The Lenovo RS110 1U’s embedded RAID is pretty basic, though (LSI MegaRAID?). I think it only supports cold-swapping. I can eject a drive from the mirror no problem while the system is running, but reinserting it.. results in a bluescreen.

To recreate the mirror, I have to reboot, go into the RAID BIOS and select “resync array” which took 4+ hours in my testing.

Stephen Taylor Jan 13 2009

So, uh what are the hosting costs?

Are all those orange trimmed boxes cooling fans? Holy bejesus that’s a lot of fans.

Out of interest, who has responsibility for fixing things if it all goes wrong at three a.m?

Eric Z. Beard Jan 13 2009

Wow, that licensing is an absolute steal! I’ve been paying $5k per socket for Sql Server. Too big to qualify for BizSpark at this point, but it would have come in handy a few years ago.

I’ll be interested to see how long this solution lasts. It’s tough to scale a big database on local drives. Maybe we’ll see the DAS/SAN blog entry in about 6 months.

Hi Jeff, please forgive my stupidity but:

>> $300 for BizSpark. See above.

Don’t you need a bit more than BizSpark? Like an OS and a database server or did you already have licenses for that?

> who has responsibility for fixing things if it all goes wrong at three a.m?

Us, of course.. me or Jarrod!

We can call the data center if we need “remote hands”.

@stephen Hill
I presume the Co-Lo costs are the $800 cut in half Jeff mentions in the post, so $4800 per year saving

Jack M. Jan 14 2009

Do you have the rest of the hardware planned out? Firewall, switches, etc? Or is the hosting providing those?

Aaron Jan 14 2009

Jeff,

I’ve used 7200 SATA before on exchange servers and the Disk I/O killed the server performance.

Are you sure your current production servers are 7200 SATA and not SAS? I can’t image a SQL server running stack overflow can run with 7200 SATA drives.

Aaron Wetherhold

Eric Z. Beard Jan 15 2009

Jeff, I have the same concern as @Aaron above. It sounds to me like your current hosting provider isn’t actually hosting your data on the box that you rent. It’s probably a volume on a high-performance SAN with 10k or 15k SAS drives. I have been very impressed with the performance of stackoverflow so far (and therefore your ability to tune it), but I have my doubts about your new server.

You should gather these performance counters from your production machine (Physical Disk _Total):

Disk Reads/sec
Disk Writes/sec

Generally what a storage professional will ask you to do is gather these stats for 24 hours and then dump the counter log to CSV (relog.exe logfile.blg –f CSV –o logfile.csv). Import that into Excel and look at your totals (Avg, Max and 95th percentile). Add up reads and writes, which gives you IOPS (I/O per second). That’s the magic number that really matters for storage performance. I think you might expect to get in the neighborhood of 500 IOPS from your 6 disk array.

You should know *for sure* before you deploy that a local 7200k RPM SATA array can handle your volume. I don’t think it can, unless I’m drastically underestimating things. Especially since you’re planning the new stackoverflow for sysadmins, which will attract a lot of new attention.

I’m also very curious to know how you will be handling your backups (including off-site copies) now that you will be managing things yourself.

Eric Z. Beard Jan 15 2009

(Just to clarify my estimate above… some people would estimate you as low as 200 IOPS sustained, but there are too many factors involved to know for sure. I don’t think anybody would put you as high as 1000.)

Aaron Jan 16 2009

Eric,

That is great stuff, thanks for expanding. I’m in the process of running the calculations on a couple of our servers. Do have any suggestions to find the IOPS of a raid array. I know the RPM of the drives, Raid hardware, and the Raid type all combine so there is no easy answer, but is there a rule of thumb or calculation that can be done.

Thanks

Aaron (looking forward to the hardware side of SO)

Eric Z. Beard Jan 16 2009

@Aaron,

For a single disk, take 1/2 spin time + avg. seek time for the IOPS a single drive will give you. So, fo example, if you fork out $1200 for a new 15k 450Gb SAS drive, an average IO operation will take 5.4ms (wow!). Divide that into 1000 and you get 185 IOPS. Multiply that by the number of drives in your array, and you get the theoretical max.

But then you have to account for RAID levels, and the quality of the machine has a lot to do with the multiplier. I have seen rough figures of:

RAID 10: 50%
RAID 5: 30%

But I have seen SAN vendors claim close to (or even higher than) 100%.

And the IOPS are always compared to the 95th percentile of your usage, since your average is too low due to lulls in activity, and max is ridiculously high.

> You should know *for sure* before you deploy that a local 7200k RPM SATA array can handle your volume

Er, with 24 GB of memory, I expect disk performance to be largely irrelevant. Our DB isn’t that large anyway; it’d probably fit in 4GB of RAM with room left over.

Still, a RAID 10 array of 7,200 RPM drives is not exactly chopped liver. The idea that you need 15,000 RPM drives to have good storage performance is a little ridiculous to me.

Eric Z. Beard Jan 17 2009

Wait a minute, Jeff. I thought you were adamant about measuring everything? Just run the perfmon counters and see what you get. If it’s something like 250 IOPS for the 95th percentile, then great, no worries (for now). But if it’s something like 1500, then you’re going to have issues.

I was estimating a larger database, so with that much RAM you should do Ok, but there’s no harm in tracking IOPS as you grow.

tomjedrz Jan 21 2009

Out esteemed host wrote …
>> Er, with 24 GB of memory, I expect disk performance
>> to be largely irrelevant. Our DB isn’t that large
>> anyway; it’d probably fit in 4GB of RAM with room
>> left over.

Jeff … this is short term thinking; be careful.

The database is going to grow exponentially, because the user base will be growing *and* the current users will keep asking and answering questions.

Plus you will continue to add features which will increase database size or require more CPU to handle.

I would not be surprised if the user base increases by 50% in the next 6 months, and the database triples. Does your analysis hold up under those conditions?

Jim Anderson Jan 28 2009

>> As far as I’m concerned performance is a core
>> feature; we can never be fast enough, and I’m
>> constantly on the lookout for ways to make pages
>> load faster.

Speaking of performance, SO seems to have slowed down considerable the last couple of days. I have tried both from work & home using IE6, IE7, & FF3, but pages are loading much slower than normal for me – navigation is no longer fairly instantaneous – there is a wait every time I click on a link.

Jeff – who are you renting rackspace from? I am looking into co-location but all of the hosts I’ve found won’t offer hardware replacement.

The fact that hosts charge $15 – $40 per gb per month of 2 year old ram is insane to me and I’m kind of tired of dealing with it. I’d much rather drop $3.5k into my own box and just pay for the bandwidth and hardware replacement if it should happen.

Dennis Jan 2 2010

@Jeff

“BizSpark is uniquely designed to accelerate your success by providing fast, affordable access to current, full-featured Microsoft tools and technologies, plus production licensing for hosted solutions.”

That is only for the period you are not public. You cannot use free licenses for business.

“Generally, a Startup’s participation in BizSpark will end after 3 years or earlier if it terminates its membership or if they’re no longer eligible (e.g., go public or are acquired).

At the end of their program participation:
• Startups will continue to enjoy the use rights of the BizSpark Program technology offer to develop, test and demonstrate as long as all members of the Startup comply with the End User License Agreement.
• Startups will no longer have use rights to the BizSpark Program technology offer for production and hosting.”

“Go public” means sell stock and shares, Dennis.

Dennis Jan 3 2010

Thanks for the explanation Jeff. I didn’t put it that way; thought that with “go public” was meant “put it live and operational on the internet for the general public”. But your explanation I like more because it does fit much better in what I am heading to. The BizSpark program in this way is much better than our MS Gold partnership where it concerns exploitation of your business.

Houda Tahbaz Jul 22 2010

May I ask where did you buy Lenovo ThinkServer barebone from? And also CPUs?

wipe ‘em all. go linux. all free.