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Podcast #19

08-28-08 by . 22 comments

This is the nineteenth episode of the StackOverflow podcast, wherein Joel and I discuss the following:

  • We’ve mapped our voting functionality to what you see in Digg and Reddit, but we’re a Q&A site, not a link aggregation service. Should we allow voting on questions as well as the answers? Or should questions simply be taggable as favorites, which are a de-facto vote? I believe voting and favorites are related, but not quite the same thing.
  • How do you deal with meta-discussion about the site? Wikipedia has two distinct areas for any page: the page itself and the “behind the curtain” discussion about the page. We don’t quite have this.
  • Joel points out that Google’s dedication to the algorithm over human intervention is on display in the Google search results for “jew”.
  • The private beta is insular in a way that isn’t immediately apparent to the people participating. We figure a huge percentage of our audience will be the barely interested programmers who end up on a Stack Overflow page from a web search. Also, the type of developers that tend to get attracted to the beta are the best, elite developers. Once the site is public, we’ll have a far wider range of skills in play — and much less sophisticated users.
  • I realized that Joel has zero votes because we actually had a XSS vulnerability — theoretically “friendly” hacker beta users intercepted our cookies and were able to impersonate us! We’ve fixed it now, but there was some minor collateral damage, such as the deletion of Joel’s voting history. This is one of the challenges of developing a site for skilled (but bored) developers with time and ability on their hands.
  • Joel cites Aaron Swartz’ blog entry How To Launch Software as perhaps a model we should follow.  The so-called “Hollywood Launch” tends to cause a huge, uncontrollable spike in traffic and then a massive drop as things don’t go to plan. See Cuil. We are both scared stiff about the amount of traffic we already have, so we’ll be proceeding carefully.
  • Our SQL Server deadlock problem was solved by switching to read committed snapshot. It turns out SQL Server is not tuned very well for typical web app loads, which consist of massive numbers of reads and miniscule numbers of writes.
  • The Stack Overflow database and webserver are currently the same machine. One easy scaling path for us is to buy another server and dedicating it to the database. I’m just unsure exactly where the transition point is for network latency versus the SQL calls staying in memory.
  • There is a huge difference between horrible legacy code by talented programmers and horrible legacy code by, well, horrible programmers. This is frequently measured in WTFs/minute.

We also answered the following listener questions:

  1. Ryan Cox: “Can you talk about backup and disaster recovery plans?”
  2. Ryan: “In developing database-centric software for multiple clients, why not use a single database rather than multiple databases for each client?”
  3. Phil Howie: “How do you balance legacy code that nobody wants to update with programmers who want to use the latest and greatest stuff?”

If you’d like to submit a question to be answered in our next episode,
record an audio file (90 seconds or less) and mail it to [email protected]. You can record a question using nothing but a telephone and a web browser.

The transcript wiki for this episode is available for public editing.

Filed under podcasts

22 Comments

Podcast is out! Subjets look great!

Salman Aug 28 2008

Jeff,
What kind of pageviews are you guys doing now?

Alistair Aug 28 2008

As well as the elite 5%-10% of programmers that make up your target audience, there’s also the code monkeys who only read tech blogs like coding horror and JOS as they’re slacking off on the pretence that they’re bettering themselves…..

My gut says that word of mouth and Google organic ranking will get it off to a good start. It will pull in exactly the developers you’re after for a nice, strong, and steady ramp up.

Is it just me or did the guy from conversation networks introducing the podcast sound a bit sad?

So – how do you insert RTF into a Word Document from a Macro without deleting the Users Clipboard? :-P

Matt B Aug 28 2008

Any idea how long the wait is for people who have signed up for the beta via the google docs form?

Michael, you sohuld listen more carefully.

Jeff, you are pissed that hacker folks did not notify you. Well after you open up the site, guess what – if you have left a weakness, it is going to be exploited cynically and abused, no matter what your feelings are.

Whoops, thanks :-)

To learn from the best ;) just check out the Daily WTF site: http://thedailywtf.com/Series/CodeSOD.aspx

>>I’m just unsure exactly where the transition point is for network latency versus the SQL calls staying in memory.

A good rule of thumb is to offload the SQL database as soon as the filesize is greater than your operating system’s RAM.

If you have a 4GB server, with the OS+IIS using 1.5GB, you will have 2.5GB left for SQL server. If your database is less than 2.5GB, SQL will effectively function as an in-memory database. You will not go to disk when reading data.

Once your database grows in filesize, you will need to go to disk more frequently, which is several orders of magnitude slower than network latency. At that point, offload to a new box.

That rule of thumb has served me well.

“Is it just me or did the guy from conversation networks introducing the podcast sound a bit sad?”

Do people actually listen to the intro then?

Hi Jeff, I’m currently maintaining web applications hosted on a dedicated web server and a separate dedicated database server. The setup is as Joel mentioned. I thought this was a standard setup.

Then again, Joel’s laptop server when he started FogCreek isn’t much better…

vzczc Aug 29 2008

It is true, I notice he sounds a bit sadder than he usually does. Bad day perhaps.

I see questions with no replies. I question if it’s a waste of time to ask questions here.

Row level locking is not the same as turning on read committed snapshot. Turning on read committed snapshot helps with row level locking, row level locking is what happens when you select, insert, update or delete a row. There are different types of locks but anytime you access a record a row level lock is used. Read committed snapshot implements a locking strategy where if someone has a row locked because they’re making changes to it anyone who reads that record will read the “old” version of the record instead of being told that the record is locked.

Isaac Lin Aug 29 2008

Though I think it is justifiable to delete meta-topics during this beta period, it does raise the question about what you will do when the site is live. If you truly intend it to be self running, how will you cope with a myriad of trivial questions (possibly added by those trying to increase the reputation)? You may need to mimic Wikipedia and figure out a way to scale up community involvement in administrative duties.

Regarding crackers, though I agree that these supposedly benign vandals were being impolite by trying to do truly destructive things, I think you are better off if security beta testers don’t give you any advance warning, so you can truly test your ability (not just your software’s) to detect and handle attacks.

@Portman:
> If you have a 4GB server, with the OS+IIS using 1.5GB, you will have 2.5GB left for SQL server. If your database is less than 2.5GB, SQL will effectively function as an in-memory database. You will not go to disk when reading data.

Only if you have done memory shenanigans with AWE, or have the 64 bit Sql Server, if I’m not mistaken…

@John Topley
Just turned on the podcast now and it was my first thought also. Maybe it is because it is sunday :)

Kendall Gelner Aug 31 2008

@ Alistair wrote: “As well as the elite 5%-10% of programmers that make up your target audience, there’s also the code monkeys who only read tech blogs like coding horror and JOS as they’re slacking off on the pretence that they’re bettering themselves…..”

Come now, you can’t read Joel On Software without inadvertently bettering yourself even if that’s not your original intent! :-)

P.S. usability issue -copying comments here is harder than it should be as the images seem to extend al the way to the very border of the text, making it hard to highlight from the first letter onward. Does a usability report get me in on the beta (I only just submitted my name to the list despite listing to the podcast for months now)

David G Sep 3 2008

I think the “cluster” Joel described (load balancer, 2 web servers, 1 database server) is ideal for many reasons. As Joel pointed out, you don’t want to be scrambling when you go live because the load is 100 times greater than you expected. I would at least have the hardware ready so that you could put together a cluster quickly.