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Archive for August, 2008

I Guess That’s Why They Call It “Beta”

08-28-08 by Jeff Atwood. 40 comments

Just a quick note to the beta participants:

We apologize for the recent spate of outages. We’re currently diagnosing a sporadic hang in the website that we haven’t quite got a handle on yet. Until we figure it out, we’re forced to restart the web service every few hours.

I’ll update this post when we get it licked, but until then, expect a bit more turbulence than usual. We appreciate your patience.

Edit: Problem solved; see Podcast #20 for explanation.

Podcast #19

08-28-08 by Jeff Atwood. 22 comments

This is the nineteenth episode of the StackOverflow podcast, wherein Joel and I discuss the following:

  • We’ve mapped our voting functionality to what you see in Digg and Reddit, but we’re a Q&A site, not a link aggregation service. Should we allow voting on questions as well as the answers? Or should questions simply be taggable as favorites, which are a de-facto vote? I believe voting and favorites are related, but not quite the same thing.
  • How do you deal with meta-discussion about the site? Wikipedia has two distinct areas for any page: the page itself and the “behind the curtain” discussion about the page. We don’t quite have this.
  • Joel points out that Google’s dedication to the algorithm over human intervention is on display in the Google search results for “jew”.
  • The private beta is insular in a way that isn’t immediately apparent to the people participating. We figure a huge percentage of our audience will be the barely interested programmers who end up on a Stack Overflow page from a web search. Also, the type of developers that tend to get attracted to the beta are the best, elite developers. Once the site is public, we’ll have a far wider range of skills in play — and much less sophisticated users.
  • I realized that Joel has zero votes because we actually had a XSS vulnerability — theoretically “friendly” hacker beta users intercepted our cookies and were able to impersonate us! We’ve fixed it now, but there was some minor collateral damage, such as the deletion of Joel’s voting history. This is one of the challenges of developing a site for skilled (but bored) developers with time and ability on their hands.
  • Joel cites Aaron Swartz’ blog entry How To Launch Software as perhaps a model we should follow.  The so-called “Hollywood Launch” tends to cause a huge, uncontrollable spike in traffic and then a massive drop as things don’t go to plan. See Cuil. We are both scared stiff about the amount of traffic we already have, so we’ll be proceeding carefully.
  • Our SQL Server deadlock problem was solved by switching to read committed snapshot. It turns out SQL Server is not tuned very well for typical web app loads, which consist of massive numbers of reads and miniscule numbers of writes.
  • The Stack Overflow database and webserver are currently the same machine. One easy scaling path for us is to buy another server and dedicating it to the database. I’m just unsure exactly where the transition point is for network latency versus the SQL calls staying in memory.
  • There is a huge difference between horrible legacy code by talented programmers and horrible legacy code by, well, horrible programmers. This is frequently measured in WTFs/minute.

We also answered the following listener questions:

  1. Ryan Cox: “Can you talk about backup and disaster recovery plans?”
  2. Ryan: “In developing database-centric software for multiple clients, why not use a single database rather than multiple databases for each client?”
  3. Phil Howie: “How do you balance legacy code that nobody wants to update with programmers who want to use the latest and greatest stuff?”

If you’d like to submit a question to be answered in our next episode,
record an audio file (90 seconds or less) and mail it to podcast@stackoverflow.com. You can record a question using nothing but a telephone and a web browser.

The transcript wiki for this episode is available for public editing.

Stack Overflow on Herding Code

08-24-08 by Jeff Atwood. 13 comments

I was invited to participate in the latest Herding Code podcast.

herding-code-logo

This was a fun one for me because I’ve known the four hosts of the program — Jon Galloway, Kevin Dente, K. Scott Allen, and Scott Koon — through their blogs since forever, eventually meeting most of them in person. All of their blogs predate mine by years. I’d almost say we were blog buddies. If you could call people blog buddies. Which I don’t think you can.

At any rate, I go into quite a bit of technical depth on Stack Overflow and some of the features that we have yet to implement, but have been hotly requested — definitely worth a listen if you want to go deep.

Thanks for having me on!

(oh, and listen past the end for a little audio easter egg that’s sort of fun)

Podcast #18

08-20-08 by Jeff Atwood. 21 comments

This is the eighteenth episode of the StackOverflow podcast, wherein Joel and I discuss the following:

  • We finally get to meet Michael Pryor, the co-founder of Fog Creek Software, who is a special guest on this episode!
  • Joel had good luck browsing our beta site using Opera Mini. I’m still incredibly impressed with the Mobile Safari browser on the iPhone, which renders our JavaScript-heavy site perfectly, as far as I can tell.
  • Joel posted a Regex question on the Stack Overflow beta, and I can’t help bringing up RegexBuddy, my favorite (and still best) regular expression tool for developers.
  • Social websites are a bit unpredictable to build — we intended Stack Overflow as a relatively straightforward question / answer site, but there’s quite a bit of demand for inter-answer discussion. Our system is designed to float the best answers to the top via voting, but this makes conversations in the answers difficult to follow.
  • Stack Overflow is a hybrid of a discussion forum, a wiki system, and a voting/reputation system. It’s been a hit so far, but we are running into some design issues resulting from this unusual combination.
  • I had the opportunity last week to meet Merlin Mann, who Joel and I are big fans of. Joel particularly enjoys their podcast, You Look Nice Today. Turns out Merlin is a fan of Joel’s as well. We should form a mutual admiration society!
  • If you’d like to sign up for the Stack Overflow private beta, which will run until the end of the month, use our Google Docs signup form.

We didn’t get to any listener questions this episode, but we’ll remedy that next time!

If you’d like to submit a question to be answered in our next episode, record an audio file (90 seconds or less) and mail it to podcast@stackoverflow.com. You can record a question using nothing but a telephone and a web browser.

The transcript wiki for this episode is available for public editing.

 

Podcast #17

08-13-08 by Jeff Atwood. 58 comments

This is the seventeenth episode of the StackOverflow podcast. Joel is on vacation, so this is a special podcast with the software development team: Jeff Atwood, Geoff Dalgas, and Jarrod Dixon.

  • Our team is geographically distributed — I’m in California, Jarrod is in North Carolina, and Geoff is in Oregon.
  • Geoff and Jarrod, like me, both grew up with BASIC programming on early computers like the Apple // and Commodore 64. Can programmers who grew up programming somehow recognize each other?
  • The private beta is going well. We think the beta will continue through the month of August. We’ll continue to add 150 users per day until the private beta is over.
  • This entire podcast was inspired by community comments on the Stack Overflow blog, so we proceeded quickly to the following questions:

We  answered the following questions left from the blog:

  1. “How do you manage collaboration on a distributed team? Is code ownership a problem?”
  2. “How do you prioritize what features you’re working on?”
  3. “How do you test new features you’re developing before you roll them out?”
  4. “What were the biggest technical challenges you had to overcome?”
  5. “What happened on the site that you didn’t anticipate?”
  6. “Are you happy with the performance of your Windows development stack on the web server?”
  7. “Will you have an API? How will you deal with spammers, griefers, and marketers?”

The Stack Overflow private beta list is essentially full until the end of the month. If you’d like an invite sooner, do two minutes of transcription in the wiki and I’ll bump you so you get an invite the same day.

If you’d like to submit a question to be answered in our next episode, record an audio file (90 seconds or less) and mail it to podcast@stackoverflow.com. You can record a question using nothing but a telephone and a web browser.

The transcript wiki for this episode is available for public editing.