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Podcast #12

07-02-08 by . 55 comments

This is the twelfth episode of the Stack Overflow podcast, wherein Joel and Jeff discuss the following:

There were no listener questions this week. Please send in your questions — the more controversial, the better!

If you’d like to submit a question to be answered in our next episode,
record an audio file (90 seconds or less) and mail it to [email protected]. You can record a question using nothing but a telephone and a web browser.

The transcript wiki for this episode is available for public editing.

 

Filed under podcasts

55 Comments

Bryce Jul 2 2008

It’s not quite version control, but why doesn’t our IDE automatically create lightweight versions every time we save?

Because you’re not using the e text editor: http://www.e-texteditor.com/

Jeff,

Don’t you think that any person making their thoughts and opinions public, could be made to look like “they don’t know what there doing”.

I think the uber-programmer/”ultimate smart person” is a myth.

Let the official record show that I emailed in my question about you guy’s book lists at least an hour and a half prior to the posting of podcast #12.

Is it really true that great minds think alike? :-)

Kurt

Gordon J Milne Jul 2 2008

You get local file saving histories (if you enable it) with JetBrains IDEA IDE – a Java IDE. You get to pick how far back your local history goes. The default is 3 days. That should be enough for air travel, even to New Zealand!

“It’s not quite version control, but why doesn’t our IDE automatically create lightweight versions every time we save?”

CodeGear’s RAD Studio (aka Delphi) has this functionality with a pretty good difference comparison. There is an add-in to use Scooter Software’s Beyond Compare with it, which is much better.

Gordon J Milne Jul 2 2008

The Pragmatic Programmer

I like this book because it uses a decent font, reads well and, more than any other book, made me realise that all my concerns about OO programming wasn’t just me being an old fart. Those vague feelings of unease come from somewhere reasonable.

PP isn’t an anti-OO book. It is a book that talks about thinking before you program and about programming into a language.

It is also chock full of tips and advocates the learning of a new (ideally very different) language every year.

A book to think with.

I wouldn’t mind my IDE storing revisions when I save if I could be sure no one I ever worked with would get lazy with real source control.

Mr Fancypants Jul 2 2008

I wouldn’t say Jeff doesn’t know what he is doing, but I would say that there seems to be a huge gulf between the way he goes about development compared to how Joel does.

Could you imagine Joel writing an essay about how Fog Creek started doing all new development on the ASP.NET MVC framework… a technology not even out of the preview stage yet and one that pretty much throws out the vast majority of the old way of doing things with asp.net without providing a new set of controls and functionality to replace the old stuff?

Don’t get me wrong, I think ASP.NET MVC will be nice… someday, but it simply isn’t ready to use, and that is coming from my POV and I’m way less conservative than Joel is.

Joel & Jeff,

Great episode, the best yet!

Sharpening skill sets outside the programming world will always help you in all your endeavors whether it’s working at a company or starting your own.

@Jeff
There was a comment made about “The Game” and I noticed it referenced in the above post. Have you had a chance to read it? The author writes about his desire an ensuing journey to becoming successful with women.

If you can’t communicate well with women, I would bet you have a communication problem in all areas of your life.

“The Game” is about a man realizing an accepting his ineptness in an area of his life and doing something about it. It’s no different than a software engineer realizing he needs to improve his social skills and reading “How to Win Friends and Influence People”.

Again great show, I look forward to future episodes and your upcoming software release.

Keep the peace,

Chuck

Roland Tepp Jul 2 2008

- “It’s not quite version control, but why doesn’t our IDE automatically create lightweight versions every time we save?”

Well Eclipse (and by extension, all of it’s derivates, including CodeGear IDE tools) have it. Absolutely indispensable and I really love this feature…

Aaron Jul 3 2008

Dot.con is a fantastic account of the internet bubble.

Also, I just read Infinite Loop, which is about Apple, and I love it.

Just a few more “this is how it happened” books for ya.

Actually, IntelliJ (the Java IDE from the creators of Resharper) has done this for years. This also means you never have to Ctrl-S to save:

http://www.codinghorror.com/blog/archives/000461.html

Hm, did Joel just say “factoring a prime number” (at 34:10)?

:-)

Dave Smillie Jul 3 2008

Love the podcast, and enjoyed this weeks episode …

but the cynic in me wonders if having an episode on books is just an excuse to get a load of those lucrative amazon affiliate links into the shownotes??

I’ve no problem with affiliate links if they have contextual significance, but I hate the idea that they might be the driving force behind the content.

Bryce beat me to it, but E is awesome — it gives you cross-session branching undo/redo and remembers everything you ever do to a file. I was using E+SVN+Tortoise on Windows, can’t wait for E to come to Linux.

Great episode.

I know it’s a lot of work, but would love to have the whole list of books from this podcast as a printed list!

Joel?

It appears some children are StackOverflow fans. Some nameless cowardly tard at 24.94.6.152 mucked with the Wiki for this transcript. By chance I was still working with it at the time and was able to clean it up quickly, but it seems some people have too much time on their hands.

Greg Jul 3 2008

Re: “It’s not quite version control, but why doesn’t our IDE automatically create lightweight versions every time we save?”

You just need to switch hardware – get a VAX with VMS. File versioning is inbuilt to the O/S. You may need to build a new room to put it in though.

Oh, the good old days…

Robert Jul 3 2008

The Eric Sink articles Jeff to which Jeff alluded:

http://www.ericsink.com/scm/source_control.html

By far your worst podcast. I’ve been following Stack Overflow all but religiously since the day each of you announced it in your respective blogs. This is the only one I’ve ever stopped listening to 1/2 way through. It started out strong but the half hour discussion of books was terrible. I read these books too and most are great but I don’t listen to a programmer’s podcast for book reports.

It may do you well to cache the gravatar icons. Today, gravatar is particularly non-responsive and as the comments increase, the page takes a long time to load.

What’s this about Joel being a Kiwi? More info please…

Eclipse is yet another IDE that saves revisions of files every time you save. You can configure size and time limits too. It’s very handy but it’s also very different than real version control.

You should try something like “git” if you want to do real commits on an airplane… Even if you use something other than “git” normally, you can use git on top of most other VCs (like CVS or SVN). Checkout “easygit”: http://www.gnome.org/~newren/eg/

Martin Wallace Jul 3 2008

This weeks podcast was not really my cup of tea – bit boring to listen to a list of Joels favourite reads. However, I understand their are others who would enjoy it, and that it would be unusual for me to expect every podcast to blow me away.

Greg Jul 3 2008

I figure I can’t really criticise a podcast for lack of content if I did not submit any questions. It’s a bit rich saying it us crap when, every week, there is a request for them.

No questions = conversations about whatever pops into their heads. Personally I would prefer this than not having the podcast at all.

I also have a hard time with people criticising something without positive suggestions on what to do instead. That’s just whinging, and not really taking up the “community” part of stack overflow.

PS: I had no problem with this week’s content.

Matt Jul 3 2008

Great podcast this week! I think reading books, and not just programming books, is ESSENTIAL to becoming a great developer.

Unfortunately, most of the developers that I meet and/or interview can’t even tell me the last book they read!

Another two books that I would recommend are Obvious Adams and Acres of Diamonds.

Speaking of version control, why did you choose to go with SVN for version control, and not go with the source control that’s built into VS.Net Team System? In previous podcasts, you mentioned that it was a lot better than the old Visual SourceSafe, and you seem to be pretty pro-MS going with SQL Server, and the built in data generation tools. It seems odd, that source control, being such an important part of the development system, that you wouldn’t choose to go with something that’s integrated so tightly into your development environment.

regarding people trying to “game the system”, Might it be possible to build a metric such that the easy way to improve you rating is to do something that is desirable?

> ould love to have the whole list of books from this podcast as a printed list!

It is linked in the post:

* Stack Overflow is meant to replace some books, but by no means all of them. We love books! We spend the rest of the episode discussing [Joel’s Fog Creek Software Management Training Program reading list][1]. It is a fantastic list, filled with excellent reads that will broaden and inspire you as a software developer — or software entrepreneur.

[1]: http://www.joelonsoftware.com/articles/FogCreekMBACurriculum.html

Spencer Jul 3 2008

I was really entertained to hear you play Flight of the Conchords on this weeks show.

I was one of the lucky few that got to see the San Francisco show while on vacation.

I used Ashlee Vance’s Geek Silicon Valley and visited the Computer History Museum, both of which I learned about from the podcast.

Thanks for the great recommendations!

> I used Ashlee Vance’s Geek Silicon Valley and visited the Computer History Museum, both of which I learned about from the podcast.

Very glad to hear that — both are outstanding!

> Unfortunately, most of the developers that I meet and/or interview can’t even tell me the last book they read!

That’s truly sad, but it mirrors my experience as well. Online we get a skewed perspective — how do you reach the unreachable?

http://www.codinghorror.com/blog/archives/001004.html

I really love and respect your work. And I know that you want to ignore including a intro in your podcast. But I would really, really love to have some intro. Not a ringtone that will get on everybodys nerves after three podcasts. But lets say a simple introduction like:
Welcome to Stackowerflow podcast #x with … and …
It would make listening to them so much easier. Because now all beginnings sound like the record button was pressed a few seconds to early.
But please keep up the work and keep people informed.

Joel is right that there is more than one Robert Cringely, but he is wrong about which is which: one Robert X. Cringely (aka Mark Stephens) did Accidental Empires, Triumph of the Nerds, and everything else you’ve ever heard of. The name originated as the pseudonym for an Infoworld column (which is where Stephens picked it up). The other Cringely’s have all been pseudonymous authors of that column. AFAIK, no other Cringely has ever used the name for anything else.

I for one appreciated this podcast despite the fact that it wasn’t about “programming” per say as dinah said. I have known about Joel’s reading list for a while, and thus was glad to hear why some of those books were on there. Joel, don’t forget that you have some younger listeners who haven’t found time amidst their studies to read all of these books. I’m 21 and only caught the “startup bug” less than a year ago! Still, you guys made me want to read most of the books on the list!

Try filehamster (http://www.mogware.com/FileHamster/) which creates backups from files on save, just what you’re looking for.

Erlend Halvorsen Jul 4 2008

Dave, are you serious?? Joel and Jeff spending an our each of their time for a few bucks from Amazon? Come on..

Great podcast guys, as usual. Actually the only podcast I bother listen to these days :)

“Ben Says: Don’t you think that any person making their thoughts and opinions public, could be made to look like “they don’t know what there doing”.”

“It is better to keep your mouth closed and let people think you are a fool than to open it and remove all doubt.” —Mark Twain

Hi,

Just a quick note – thanks for recording the podcasts; they’re interesting and enjoyable.

David

Rob Burke Jul 7 2008

Any update on when the beta will begin guys?

Cheers,
Rob

Chris is right. And the Book/Video/no-longer-Infoworld Cringley has a blog on PBS.

http://www.pbs.org/cringely/

This is really off-topic guys (I managed not to close my winamp, but that was really hard).

It should be a podcast about stackoverflow.com and how you do things in order to develop it. For example it would be interesting to hear how Jeff deals with the func spec writing/updating cycle. I would love a rant on that rather than enumerating books.

“It’s not quite version control, but why doesn’t our IDE automatically create lightweight versions every time we save?”

Since I primarily work in SQL, I actually wrote a program in c# that “listens” (using filesystemwatcher) to a directory and uses SVN to add/commit everytime something changes in the directory. This allowed me to work in MS-SQL scripts, save often, and then have a history of changes to a script I was working on. Very handy, for those one-off updates or scripts that need to be done to a database during development.

John Riston Jul 7 2008

Jeff,

I really used to like listening to your podcast, until you revealed that you went to UVA! (Go Terps!)

Just giving you a hard time. I enjoyed the book list and have purchased many you recommend. I look forward to using this site when it goes live.

Lasse V. Karlsen Jul 7 2008

Joel, just for the record, dropping a baby is not funny in any context (@17:02).

@DC – “It should be a podcast about stackoverflow.com and how you do things in order to develop it. For example it would be interesting to hear how Jeff deals with the func spec writing/updating cycle.” Did you miss the bit where Jeff says he doesn’t have a list of tasks? Looking forward to next week’s punch up where Joel attempts to teach Jeff project planning using a baseball bat and a hosted copy of FogBugz.

But I have a question: why don’t they use the questions from previous weeks, that they didn’t have time to use in previous podcasts? People must have sent in many, many fine questions and they’ve answered about ten so far.

But it’s all good crack – roll on next week!

T. Morgan Jul 8 2008

“By far your worst podcast… This is the only one I’ve ever stopped listening to 1/2 way through. It started out strong but the half hour discussion of books was terrible. I read these books too and most are great but I don’t listen to a programmer’s podcast for book reports.”

Too strong by half, but I generally agree. The podcast has been surprisingly good up to this point. I listen to a fair amount of programming podcasts and for whatever reason you two huckleberries are able to do it well. Incidentally, Atwood sounds exactly like his photo and writing look. Joel sounds like a very nice person. Being opinionated and coming off as a kind, warm fellow is tricky. I’d work for him, but I don’t get things done and I’m stupid.

I listened to the whole thing, but I was kinda bored. I intend no insult – this is just my objective feedback. Great idea. Keep it up.

watt Jul 9 2008

can’t wait until tomorrows podcast!

Good podcast but I disagree with your statements about Silicon Valley vs. other places and think you didn’t really give good advice.

First of all

There is plenty of companies making good money in Europe and Middle east. They might not be google but then again how many companies are.

Skype was founded by a Danish and a Swedish guy they are not from the Netherlands.

Kazaa (also Janus and Niklas)

LastFM is English

Zyb that got sold to Vodafone was Danish, Threadless is German as far as I remember.

There are many venture capital companies other places and American venture companies don’t just invest in American companies.

The American market is good but the global market is better, mind you that American companies also try to get into other markets than their own.

I could probably provide a longer list but you get the point.

The guys question was if I understand it correctly “do you have any advice for people who wants do a startup that is not in Silicon Valley”

Doing a lot of work with startups around the world from one location but servicing the world my self and being well connected in the venture capital world my advice would be the following.

Find as many good people locally no matter where you are. Use a good online project managenment tool, a good coding platform if you need to work with people other places.

Depending on your skillset and what you are building make sure you have some good designers to help productify can simplify your ideas. It does not matter if they are local or somewhere else.

You don’t need to be google to have a successful company there are many great local markets out there.

And remember

Start Simple
Build to Scale
Don’t do everything that is possible only what is nessecary.

Best

Thomas

NickL Jul 10 2008

@Lasse
I came here to say, yes, yes it is. Different strokes for different folks…

Also,
I didn’t like all the UI books you mentioned. I haven’t read them so I hope my interpretation is accurate, correct me if I’m wrong, but skills in programming are what I’ve focused on –I am a new grad. I want to suggest, ‘Purely Functional Data Structures’. It’s my current read and gives a great insight on minimizing space/time in an immutable world. I’m currently working with a functional language (ocaml), and doing scientific software, so I might be a bit different then the norm (?).

Jeff, you mentioned in passing something about the undo functionality and going back to previous versions (in conjunction with the early talk about Subversion and offlinedness). You may want to check out e-TextEditor. This is now my editor of choice. It also stored total undo functionality, even after you have closed the file and re-opened it.

I liked it so much I paid for it.

Hey all, great stuff!

Could you possibly take that book list and categorize them somehow? Maybe ‘must reads,’ ‘must reads 2,’ or by the type. ‘Programming,’ ‘Programming management,’ ‘Code improvement’.

I must have watched Startup.com a dozen times. It’s a great documentary.

Bremen Jul 15 2008

Regarding undervolting, the new Centrino 2 laptop platform lowers the Vcc[1] on the new 45nm Intel chips to achieve a lower TDP… time for a new laptop!

[1] http://www.anandtech.com/cpuchipsets/intel/showdoc.aspx?i=3356&p=3

I’m surprised Charles Petzold’s CODE:
The Hidden Language of Computer Hardware and Software
wasn’t mentioned!

Adam Dec 4 2008

This is the podcast where Joel mentions Hackers and Painters, isn’t it? This is a fabulous response:
http://www.idlewords.com/2005/04/dabblers_and_blowhards.htm