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Archive for May, 2008

Podcast #5

05-13-08 by Jeff Atwood. 48 comments

This is the fifth episode of the StackOverflow podcast, wherein Joel and I discuss the following:

  • Trivia clarifications from podcast #3: Leonardo DiCaprio on Growing Pains, and how the Fonz actually Jumped the Shark in Happy Days
  • Thanks for all the offers to pitch in and help!
  • The StackOverflow private beta should be in about 6-8 weeks.
  • My depressing lack of project planning: Joel maintains I need a task list. In Fogbugz, of course.
  • A discussion of the ASP.NET login provider model and NTLM, and how to enable NTLM in Firefox.
  • A correlation between the prevalence of NTLM and Microsoft’s model of developing software for corporations versus developing software for consumers.
  • A discussion on David Heinemeier-Hansson’s excellent Startup School talk: Is it pathetic that someone needs to stand up at a startup school and tell people that they need to charge for their product?
  • Businesses will spend money — consumers won’t. You can’t make money selling commodities to consumers as a startup; you have to sell a luxury.
  • The Google model: get the eyeballs, figure out how to make money later. Is that fair to startups? Can every startup make it to the necessary scale to get that revenue model to work?
  • experiments with AdSense on fakeplasticrock.com and codinghorror.com (search)
  • Why Joel and I feel compelled to run ad-blocking software in our browsers. Why doesn’t it block the Google search result ads? Are search result ads more task-related and thus useful?
  • Jamie Zawinski on social networking websites: they should get you laid.
  • I try to get Joel to use Twitter again, and he references the Penny Arcade cartoon. I still think it’s useful. Follow me on Twitter!
  • A (very) long — but worthwhile — discussion about my recent post on XML.
  • Revealing Notepad’s “bug”.
  • Apps like RescueTime which track what applications you’re running over time.
  • Discusssion of an email from Michael Dorfman, wherein he is embarrassed on my behalf for my lack of computer science rigor.
  • Joel questions the sense of humor of his readers.
  • A brief bit of advice from Joel on washing your electronics, and how to fix your computers by dropping them. Hey, I didn’t say it was good advice.
  • Thank you for all the questions and for the Wiki edits!

There were no listener questions this week. We’d love to answer your questions on any topic!

If you’d like to submit a question to be answered in our next episode,
record an audio file (90 seconds or less) and mail it to [email protected].

The transcript wiki for this episode is available for public editing.

Podcast #4

05-06-08 by Jeff Atwood. 55 comments

This is the fourth episode of the StackOverflow podcast, wherein Joel and I discuss the following:

  • Why we think stackoverflow.com isn’t “reinventing the wheel”, or at least, reinventing it in a useful way. Failure, however, is always an option.
  • We will be using ASP.NET MVC to build stackoverflow, as covered in my recent blog post. Joel and I carry on a long discussion of Model-View-Controller.
  • A mention of CSS Zen Garden. Joel thinks it’s an unrealistic example, but I don’t.
  • Defining “skinnability”, whether it applies to your application, or if it even matters.
  • A mention of this year’s Maker Faire, where I met the Wikimedia Foundation’s Jay Walsh. Followed by an examination of why we admire Wikipedia and consider it a defining influence.
  • Guests welcome! You will be able to participate fully in stackoverflow.com without ever creating an account — but there will be perks for creating an account.
  • A bit about our reputation system — learning the lessons of PageRank.
  • Dealing with the inevitable evil users and users who actively game the reputation system. Not you, of course. We like you.
  • Adopting Creative Commons by-nc-sa for our podcast and CCWiki for stackoverflow.com.
  • On the contract between Joel and Jeff to form stackoverflow.com : the difference between a C Corporation and Limited Liability Company (scintillating!)
  • Do we need lawyers? Yes, we need lawyers. Unfortunately.
  • The final results of our logo contest.
  • Twitter: is it only useful for “web celebrities?” I personally love Twitter and find it quite useful. Follow me on Twitter, and see for yourself. I’ll try to convince Joel to join up.
  • Tip of the week: Redgate SQL Compare.
  • Thank you for all the questions and for the Wiki edits!

We also answered the following listener questions, with a lot of peripheral discussion on related topics:

  1. Kyle Neumeier: How will you provide enough content to achieve a critical mass of activity on stackoverflow.com?
  2. Andrew Morrow: How will you deal with answer ordering and voting? Will it be based on votes alone? If so, how do we follow the thread of a conversation?
  3. ObviousTroll: Is it worthwhile to go back to school and get a graduate degree in computer science?

If you’d like to submit a question to be answered in our next episode,
record an audio file (90 seconds or less) and mail it to [email protected].

The transcript wiki for this episode is available for public editing.

Now Licensed Under Creative Commons

05-05-08 by Jeff Atwood. 12 comments

The Creative Commons site defines four main clauses for licensing of content you’ve created and placed on the web:

Attribution Attribution

You let others copy, distribute, display, and perform your copyrighted work — and derivative works based upon it — but only if they give credit the way you request.

NoncommercialNoncommercial

You let others copy, distribute, display, and perform your work — and derivative works based upon it — but for noncommercial purposes only

No Derivative Works No Derivative Works

You let others copy, distribute, display, and perform only verbatim copies of your work, not derivative works based upon it.

Share Alike Share Alike

You allow others to distribute derivative works only under a license identical to the license that governs your work.

This is, of course, assuming you want to share what you’ve created in some way. Everything you do is copyrighted by default until you say otherwise — granting no rights to anyone whatsoever. When you select a Creative Commons license, you’re consciously choosing to push aside some of your copyright and explicitly grant rights for others to do things with the audio, video, or text you’ve created and placed on the web. What that “stuff” is, of course, is up to you as the creator.

According to the Wikipedia page on Creative Commons Licenses, the attribution clause proved so popular that it’s always on by default. So the Choose a License page essentially guides you through selecting the remaining three reuse clauses, with the following questions as a guide:

  1. Will you allow commercial uses of your work?
    • Yes
    • No
  2. Will you allow modifications of your work?
    • Yes
    • Yes, as long as others share alike
    • No

As simple as the licenses may seem, it’s a good idea to read through the things to think about section of the Creative Commons site before selecting one.

After some consideration, I’ve licensed our podcasts under the following Creative Commons license:

Creative Commons License