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Archive for May, 2008

Podcast #7

05-27-08 by Jeff Atwood. 70 comments

This is the seventh episode of the StackOverflow podcast, wherein Joel and I discuss the following:

  • Many thanks to Stuart Cam for recording a stackoverflow theme song; a brief digression on the introductions to the Sopranos and Get Smart.
  • How programmers know it’s a holiday: the door to the office is locked, or the Google logo changes.
  • Tuesday is also Rock Band new song download day. This week was pretty epic — the complete album The Cars. Joel would like the 1975 song Convoy. Maybe he’s a CB radio fan?
  • Working from home, I miss some of the camaraderie of my fellow programmers. What can I do about that? I’ve always admired Joel’s commitment to creating a good working environment for programmers. Joel has a regular column in Inc. magazine, and the June issue happens to cover this topic.
  • Joel calls http://www.officesnapshots.com/ “office pornography”, where “pornography” is described as “looking at pictures of things you can’t have.” It’s also sort of like MTV Cribs for the IT set.
  • Joel points out that cool office common areas are great, but what really matters is the desk where you actually do your work.
  • I like to build my own PCs and use three monitors, so it’s difficult for me to bring my work with me without it turning into a comedy routine. Another reason I enjoy having my own office: I’m into decorating — see my old office at Vertigo.
  • Do private offices interfere with collaboration and pair programming?
  • Which configuration of monitors is ideal for programming?
  • I profess my love for WinSplit Revolution, which I consider essential on any monitor larger than 22″. We also wonder why OS window managers aren’t smarter about edge snapping and using available desktop space intelligently.
  • An extended discussion of OpenID. I encourage everyone reading this to sign up for an OpenID and try it yourself. I recommend myopenid. Joel signs up for an OpenID live on the podcast.
  • The importance of proper OpenID attribute exchange — so you can store your avatar image, URL, birthday, address and so forth in one place and have it handed over automatically to websites from your OpenID provider. Without this, OpenID is much less attractive.
  • A discussion of Eric Sink’s C and Morse Code — isn’t programmer time spent learning C better spent learning how to communicate and understand the business domain they’re working in? There’s a deeper topic of Systems Analyst vs. Programmer here that we’ll have to dig into.
  • Reminder: Joel will be in Portland keynoting RailsConf later this week.
  • Joel wants people to write in about their preferred password management solutions.
  • As usual, thank you for all the questions and for the Wiki edits! We appreciate all the interest in the private beta signups, too.

We also answered the following listener question, with a lot of peripheral discussion on related topics:

  1. John Dyer: Isn’t it better for programmers to program using standard programming frameworks and libraries rather than creating things from scratch?

If you’d like to submit a question to be answered in our next episode,
record an audio file (90 seconds or less) and mail it to [email protected]. You can record a question using nothing but a telephone and a web browser.

The transcript wiki for this episode is available for public editing.

Potential Markup and Editing Choices

05-22-08 by Jeff Atwood. 68 comments

Question and answer entry will be arguably the most crucial piece of stackoverflow. I used the post Is HTML a Humane Markup Language? as a form of collaborative research to determine what our Q&A editor should look like. Based on the (extensive!) feedback, I’ve reached three conclusions:

  1. Most programmers want either an HTML subset or Markdown.
  2. Many prefer a formatting toolbar, although I view it as superfluous.
  3. Real-time preview of text formatting is an absolute must.

Good programmers never write what they can steal or borrow. With that in mind, I did some research and found the promising but unfortunately named WMD: The Wysiwym Markdown Editor from AttackLab.

wmd-advanced-demo1

I emailed AttackLab and John Fraser was kind enough to respond with a code drop. Apparently there’s going to be an open source release at http://wmd.googlecode.com/ any day now — it will also include a post-processing callback we can use to do syntax highlighting. Here’s a demo someone hacked together using WMD and a syntax highlighter:

showdown-demo

Adopting tools like these means we’d be very intimately tied to JavaScript on the client, of course, but it’s hard for me to see how that’s a problem on today’s web.

What do you think of these solutions? Would they work for you when posting programming questions and answers on stackoverflow?

Podcast #6

05-20-08 by Jeff Atwood. 32 comments

This is the sixth episode of the StackOverflow podcast, wherein Joel and I discuss the following:

  • A mercifully brief critique of Joel’s Skype avatar. Of course, he should be using this image.
  • The other programmer I’m working with, Jarrod, will be visiting me this week. It’s his first visit to California! Welcome to the San Francisco Bay area — geek mecca. We will get some pair programming time in.
  • We’ll also visit the Computer History Museum, one of my favorite places in the world. I like to refer to it as computer hardware pornography.
  • An examination of the ASP.NET MVC development model as compared to the classic ASP.NET Form model.
  • We’ll be using JQuery as our JavaScript and AJAX framework, and ELMAH for error handling duties.
  • A bit on the Fog Creek philosophy of error handling: crashes are automatically entered in Fogbugz.
  • About crashing in general. I enjoy talking about this because I think it’s incredibly important. Crash responsibly!
  • Why you should pay people not to work at your company.
  • Why am I so evangelical about Twitter?
  • What should Joel talk about at the Rails Conference Keynote?
  • Is it unfair to dismiss Java? Is the only difference between Java and COBOL that Java doesn’t require you to type keywords in all capital letters?
  • The rare topic that Joel and I agree on: presentations should be about entertainment first and information second.
  • What’s the best way to deal with the larger bandwidth requirements for a podcast? We’re going to use up more than 1250 GB this month. Should we be on ITConversations?
  • We would like to support OpenID for site logins.
  • About my $5,000 donation to open source on .NET — or more specifically, to ScrewTurn Wiki.
  • A brief mention of Google DocType and the now defunct Google Answers.
  • Is Google starting to have the Microsoft “big company” problem? Why can’t big companies effectively spin off smaller companies?
  • What is the Microsoft “Strategy Tax”?
  • The list of new features in Vista. How many did you know about? More importantly, how many of these features do you use and care about?
  • A mention of the Software Engineering Radio podcast.
  • As usual, thank you for all the questions and for the Wiki edits! We appreciate all the interest in the private beta signups, too.

We also answered the following listener questions, with a lot of peripheral discussion on related topics:

  1. Warren Henning: Why custom build stackoverflow.com when you could use something off the shelf?
  2. Andrew Hay: Why did you choose to reinvent the default ASP.NET membership provider?
  3. Martin Wallace: Have you considered open sourcing the stackoverflow.com code?
  4. Daniel Thompson: What should be in the next version of Windows, and is it worth spending hundreds of dollars to upgrade?

If you’d like to submit a question to be answered in our next episode,
record an audio file (90 seconds or less) and mail it to [email protected]. You can record a question using nothing but a telephone and a web browser.

The transcript wiki for this episode is available for public editing.

Update Your Flash Player

05-18-08 by Jeff Atwood. 14 comments

I noticed that a few people have had trouble with the embedded flash podcast player in the podcast posts. They reported that Joel and I sounded like chipmunks.

I was able to duplicate this problem using a virtual machine and a stock version of Windows XP. If you’re having the chipmunk playback problem, you have an out-of-date installation of Adobe Flash. That’s the cause.

I strongly recommend Updating your Flash Player to the latest version. Bear in mind, if you regularly use more than one browser, you must update Flash individually for each browser you use.

If you’re wondering what version of Flash you have installed, use the official Adobe online Flash version number checker. It’s reporting I have version 9.0.115.0 installed at the moment.

Updating Flash isn’t just a good idea to correct the playback issues with our podcast audio player — it’s also a good idea because there are serious security vulnerabilities in old versions of Flash, too. If your Flash is version 9.0.48.0 or earlier, you’re subject to at least 9 critical security vulnerabilities according to Adobe! And remember, these are the worst kinds of vulnerabilities — the ones that can compromise your system by simply visiting the wrong web page. Scary stuff.

Let’s practice safe computing and get that Flash player updated!

Recording Podcast Questions Using Your Telephone

05-14-08 by Jeff Atwood. 16 comments

If you want to submit a question for the next podcast, it must be in audio format. If you don’t have an easy way to record your question, here’s how. Use the BlogTalkRadio Cinch service:

  1. Call (646) 200-0000
  2. Talk
  3. Get the RSS feed at http://cinch.blogtalkradio.com/YOURPHONENUMBER

I just tried it, and it really works! I called 646-200-0000 from my cell phone, talked, hung up, then navigated to http://cinch.blogtalkradio.com/510620xxxx in my web browser:

Cinch result rss feed screenshot

The resulting mp3 file is 32 kbps, 11 kHz. There’s a small “blog talk radio!” intro added, then whatever you said on the telephone.

Listen to my sample mp3 (43kb)

Just call 646-200-0000, talk, hang up, then visit the URL to download your freshly created mp3 audio file — and mail it to us at [email protected]. It really is that easy!

Thanks again to Tim Patterson for turning us on to this cool and free service!